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Thread: No balls

  1. #26
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    Dude,

    Save your balls for what they were designed for... part of a love machine package under the covers. Our club has a saying "walk today, ride tommorrow, crash today, cry in sorrow". 'E'nuf Said.

  2. #27
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    Why would take advice off a bunch of internet losers like us? Take it from a great American hero!


    Lance Murdoch: Bones heal, chicks dig scars, and the United States of America has the best doctor-to-daredevil ratio in the world.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  3. #28
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    I agree with the 90con and 10skill... but without the proper skill you still suck. Think of it like IQ.... you have set #, that is your potential. Some people use all theirs, others use none. Filling your IQ cup is your job.... training and more training make a dumb guy smart. You have a potential in biking.... your bike IQ. To fill it you need to train and train some more. And you need to train properly. One thing that has helped for me was the video Fundamentals. The right skills helps that confidence really go up. (This is beginning to sound like a dear Abby)

    I am not a natural athlete. When it comes to biking I have been very slow at progression. Proper training, patience, and practice have all helped me to man up and hit stuff that I thought impossible.
    Bikeless Rider

  4. #29
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    i started a year ago and have become pretty good at doing technical trails, i seem to have a block with jumps and drops though, anything over a foot and im looking for a way around it, i can jump 4 stairs easy but i find street drops way different to offroad.

    yesterday i was with a friend of mine (expert rider) on the local downhill run, i was trying to psyche myself up for a 2 foot drop, sounds easy but the terrain is very rocky and you cant see the landing the behind the drop, it was freaking me out,

    i did the worst thing you can do, went for it and at the last moment slammed on the brakes thinking i could stop in time, i nose dived off the drop flew over the bars tried to break the fall with my hands but came down on my head anyway, i was ok but my right hand is sore from taking the impact, my shoulder and left arm ache and i hurt my left knee, im lucky i was fully armoured in leg gaurds full face and a pressure suit or else i wouldve been a lot worse, now i have to wait until the aches and pains go away to go back up there and drop off that thing,

    my bike friends are all mountain bike guides technicians or both, its frustrating to not be able to ride like them i think i have a little in common with the original poster, if we enjoy it and i do, stick with it

  5. #30
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    speed is your friend when doing jumps and drops...keep up your speed andif you are blanced on the bike you will land it, then worry about the terrain once you are back on terra firma

  6. #31
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    coupla thoughts for you

    I'm also on a Stumpy, here's a few things I've done to use it on the Norshore in BC.

    1) get a Kenda Nevegal Kevlar bead 2.35 front tire, the back one's OK, that'll give a bit more traction up front and help you on technical stuff. Run it soft, abut 20lbs, or whatever your weight allows to make it wrap around all the slippery stuff you ride over that freaks you. If you don't want a new front tire, then soften the one you have mounted.

    2) practise balance: track-stands, and tight, tight circles on the flat. Your butt will think the bike and you are one, and when the going gets tricky, then no problem.

    Lastly, dress for the crash, not the ride. Combine that with dogonfr's advice of look ahead not down, + commit to the trail, and you'll start to feel the flow.

    Cheers, and good luck, Jim

  7. #32
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    I agree with the "speed helps" bit. the worst biking injury I've had was when i went over the bars and landed head first off of a relatively small drop that I didn't know was there. I was also not going quite fast enough for it, and my weight was too far forward, so the front wheel dropped, i went OTB and landed on my head. had I known the drop was there, I likely would have hit it as fast as I could and shift my weight far enough back so that the rear tire touched down first. or, if I didn't feel like going for it, I would have taken the ride-around. another piece of advice: if there is a section you haven't ridden before, either walk it or at least get off and take a good look at it before you ride it. this gives you a chance to see if you feel you can clear the section or not, and also gives you a good chance to look for what appears to be the best line through that section. if you feel up to the task of riding that section, you know what is in store and you can hit it as hard as you dare. if you don't feel up to it, all you have to do is get your bike and walk past it.
    Quote Originally Posted by teamdicky View Post
    My butthole would pucker and invert until I was inside-out before I got to the bottom.

  8. #33
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    Point and Shoot

    This is my girlfriends favorite saying. She does quite well on rocky downhills. Coming from years of jumping horses in competition helps. (not her jumping over the horses, but riding them over jumps)

    Worst thing you can do is brake too much. Sometimes you just got to let the wheels roll, and let it flow.

    Good pads do help too, if it improves confidence. That and pedals you can get out of. Good platforms with 5-10 shoes, or clipless if you are used to them. We both like our Shimano M-647 pedals with multi release cleats. Give you good power up climbs, but very easy out.

    We have tried several types of knee pads recently. Rockgarden LZMX, and the Landing Zones. But our new favorite is the Dainese 3X knee guards. These are easy on and off, and truly comfortable to wear both uphill and downhill.

  9. #34
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    When you do clear something that scares you. Walk back up and do it again. Reinforcing the motions and breaking down the mental block will do wonders.
    When I dont do this the same sections of a trail will freak me out even thought i have cleared them before. Clearing them twice back to back seems to erase the fear.

    Or you could just date a woman who is worse on a bike than you are.

  10. #35
    Capricious youth...
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    -Hit it just lightly faster than you think you should.

    -Talk yourself through it (ie. say out loud "don't brake check, DON'T BRAKE CHECK!)

    -More speed on slippery surfaces means better traction (rocks, gravel, dust, etc.)

    -After you do something, do it again immediately. If you do something once, you might account it to luck. If you do it twice, you get to remind yourself that you have the skill to do it again and again.

    -Celebrate after you've done something. Get off the bike, look at it, and know that you just gave that jump/drop/rock garden a serious middle finger.
    Meh.

  11. #36
    attending to my vices
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    sorry, I can't tell in the picture, but if you are using clip-in pedals, ditch them. Get any brand of BMX flat pedals until you master your balance and your balls. Then you can decide to go back to clip-ins for extra climbing ease.
    OVER THE LINE SMOKEY!

  12. #37
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    Good thread and lot of info for you to soak up.

    Manowar, one thing I'll add is what helps me. When I watch someone do a particular move I pay very close attention to how they pull it off. I watch the body position on the bike, how they pull up on the bars to do a step up or lean way back to do a steep roller, etc. It really helps me visualize how I would pull it off.

    I was always a daredevil on a bmx bike when I was a kid but didn't get back into riding a mountain bike seriously until 2 yrs ago when I was 34. All those skills had vanished as well as the fearlessness. But after I hit my first 2' drop, it all seamed to be easy. I got the feeling of doing it and the more I did it, the more confidence I gained and now I go off of things 4' high with confidence.

    Start small on each type of move you want to master and watch how your GF does it. Then practice on those smaller moves doing what she does until you feel confident. Then move it up a notch and get confident on slightly larger moves. It's all about the technique, practice and confidence and last but not least....bike setup.

    Doing a steep roller with your seat up high isn't a recipe for success. Hey, I'm no technical master but I'm getting better and more confident as I continue to ride with people who are better than I am. It's made me a better rider. And since you've got a mountain biking GF who also happens to be a better technical rider than you, I'd say you've already found the perfect riding partner!

    Good luck and go hit some dirt!

    JP

  13. #38
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    this might be inspiring! just aim to do this one day:


    (Lance Canfield)

  14. #39
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    Looking at your photos I would feel better wearing knee pads and even elbow pads riding through that rocky terrain, if your not confident it makes sense to protect your self, it only takes a few knocks to put a dent in your confidence, I always put some pads on if I'm going somewhere I don't know or I know is technical, I get laughed at but when the other guys bin it they are bleeding and hurting, where I just have a dent in my pride.
    If in doubt bum back is my moto :-)

  15. #40
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    start downhilling.

  16. #41
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    I can recommend the Fluidride DVD for learning body position and technique.

    I was a wuss in rocky terrain for a long time when I had a Kona set up for XC biking. Long bar stem and high saddle plus clip ins.
    After getting a real bike (HT), low saddle (always standing up), 40 mm stem, flatties, RS Pike 426 and wide handlebar. I can now suddenly push through all those difficult trails.
    No OTB yet on it

    The day after this post I OTB'd hard, nothing broken though...
    Last edited by chksix; 11-19-2008 at 01:19 AM.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Commitment is everything. Only when you commit ahead of time will you have the SPEED to carry you thru/over stuff. I crash on stuff all the time because I am going too slow.

    Amem brother. Thats what it all about. Whether you are scared or not doesnt matter. Commitment creates a visulization and positive thought process which if executed properly, your body will get you through the other side, off the ledge, over the obstacle or whatever. This is all possible while still being a little scared. Also, after many successful stunts, jumps or whatever you will have built up a confidence in your riding making the whole process second nature. I know is sounds a little hippie like or maybe new age but whatever you call it, it works. I used to race speedway motorcycles and commitment to getting into and through the corners at full speed while carrying a ton of grip was one of the first things I was taught. In short, it all starts upstairs in your dome and then your body carries out the orders.
    Last edited by philb3131; 11-19-2008 at 12:09 AM.

  18. #43
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    I'm in a fairly similar situation as you... a good bit farther along on the skill range, but still I don't really have the confidence to send it like a lot of my buddies do. A couple days I was riding a trail near us. I kinda just call everything where you pedal up cross-country, but I guess that a lot of people would call it all-mountain or even light freeride. It's a fun, steep, sometimes pretty sketchy trail with a number of drops and jumps. One in particular was a log drop. Probably only 3 feet or so, but you had to go fairly far out to avoid other logs under it and the landing was immediately followed by a loose switchback turn.

    My friend took one look and launched it. No problem. I wasn't quite so sure. Two main thoughts convinced me to try it:

    1) Almost nothing is as bad as it looks. Seriously, how many times have you done something and been like, "Wow I can't believe that I was so freaked out by that".

    2) I thought of what could realistically go wrong. I almost certainly wasn't going to overshoot it, so the worst that could happen would be I wouldn't pop it enough and would endo. End result... damaged pride and maybe some scrapes and bruises. Nothing too bad.

    So I went for it. And you know what? It was easy. Nothing to it. Simple pull up on the bars and fly right over and rail the corner.

  19. #44
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    By a pair of plastic balls, attach to the saddle, and ride around. You will look so...odd... that you will forget about other distractions.


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