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  1. #1
    s62
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    New Bike Questions

    So, I will be receiving a new bike in about a week. I've ordered it from Jenson USA. It's the Jamis Dakar XLT 2.0 '05. It been put together, and then disassembled for sake of packing and shipping. When I get the bike, I expect most things to be functional and assembled, such as the break system, etc. However, I know I'll have something to work on, and thus I have a few questions. This is my first real mountain bike, and I'm not sure how everything works. So...

    1.) The suspension. What do I need to do to dial in the suspension to work for me? The fork in a Manitou Minute 3:00, and then rear is a Manitou 4-Way SPV Swinger. I know I need to adjust the sag, but I have no idea how to, or even what sag refers to. Also, how do I know what PSI to set the main shock and the SPV to? I know it has to do with my weight, but I'm not sure how to determine that. Then, there are questions of dampening and rebound. What exactly do these terms refer to? How do I set them, and again, is this based on weight, or terrain, or what? I'll be doing tricky extreme XC stuff with some smaller drops (2-4 feet). So, lots of big roots, rocks, etc. Finally, what do I do with the adjustable travel? Climbing, should it almost always be set to 100mm, or is that variable? Some people say the SPV means you don't have to drop the travel, and that this bike runs fine all the way open (at 130mm). Finally, how often should I lube the fork and rear? Should I wipe the fork clean after every ride? How do you generally care for them?

    2.) What general tune-up and condition things should I look for when I get the bike and have it put together? Tension on spokes, or is that too picky? Cable tension? Should I bleed the breaks (even if already done before shipped)? Lubricate the chain, shocks? What flaws or problems should I be aware of and look for up front? What things should I do to the bike before it's first ride?

    3.) I already own a blackburn multitool with a chain tool and tire levers on it. What other tools will I need? Also, what spare parts would you consistantly have on hand. I am interested in being mechanically competant with this bicycle. I'd like to get involved with its upkeep and avoid the LBS as much as possible (not b/c I'm cheap, but b/c I want to really know what I'm doing and self-sufficient).

    4.) Could you point me towards a good tutorial on changing tires/flats, etc? I figure that's a key thing to know how to do.

    5.) Finally, let's talk briefly about AM protective gear. I've got Rockgardn elbow/forearm guards, shin/knee guards, googles, and gloves, as well as a Bell Bellistic full-face helmet. What else should I buy? Neck-roll? Ankle reinforcement? Padded shorts?

    Thanks for helping me out here! If you can think of anything I need to know about getting a new bike, first ride, first checkout, first tuneup, etc., please let me know. Thanks in advance for your help, and I look forward to sharing my bike porno with you guys!

  2. #2
    s62
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    Should I repost in general?

  3. #3
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    For online tutorials look here(my personal favorite - more pics, simpler explanations):
    http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/
    and here - more towards professionals:
    http://www.parktool.com/repair/
    My bike is way simpler than yours, so out of all your questions, I can answer very few. SAG is fork/rear suspension compression under weight of the rider. Normally sag must be somewhere between 15 and 25% of the suspension travel. Rebound is the speed suspension returns to the original position at. For all I remember, in general, the more rugged the terrain is, the slower rebound you are supposed to need. For more explanations, look in the manitou website(I think, it is www.manitou.com).
    As to spare parts, in my opinion, the part you should get immediately, is a spare derailleur hanger. It is a good idea to have one with you on rides.
    Tools - you will need a good set of separate Allen keys, 2 mm - 8 mm must be enough, but you will have to check your bike to know for sure(those in the multi-tool are good for quick fix out in the wilderness. Not for servicing the bike at home.). Also, normally you will need thin wrenches for servicing the hubs(15 mm and 13 mm). 17 mm for lock nuts, not necessarily thin. 15 mm will also be needed for assembling/taking off the pedals.If you absolutely insist on avoiding LBS, you will need also the cassette wrench and bottom bracket wrench - and something like a big adjusting wrench to use with them.
    A separate spoke wrench is a good idea too. I also prefer having a separate chain breaker.
    Get spare tubes, pump and flat kit. Also, I'd recommend to fill the tubes(including the spares) with sealant. Along with flat kit, I carry a small bottle of acetone and piece of cloth to clean the tube before repairing a flat.

  4. #4
    s62
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    Great! Thanks for the advice! All very helpful...
    Anyone else?

  5. #5
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    Well, everybody seem to be out riding...So couple more things I forgot yesterday.
    You will need a shock pump, if you don't get it with the bike. In my opinion, it must not be portable. That is, you don't have to carry it with you on rides, just use from time to time at home to adjust pressure in the shocks. So you may buy one larger hence cheaper.
    Crank remover.
    A wire cutter for the gear cables. I use a regular electrician's cutter of reasonable quality. It won't be enough to cut housings though. I just reuse them. For housings a dedicated cutter is needed. Also, I use an electrician's tool(don't know the English for it) for pressing the cable ends.
    And - the tool most helpful of all: my late gramma's favorite saying: "Eyes are fearing, hands are doing" - that is, positive attitude .

  6. #6
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    1) As others have already mentioned, sag is the amount of suspension compression with you just sitting on the bike. Most shocks have an o ring on the shaft, take the stroke length, divide by 4, and thats how far down the shaft the oring should be after you have sat on the bike. As you ride, you will probably want to tweak, which is why I personally like to have a shock pump that's portable. As far as damping and rebound, the set up of these is largely personal preference. The spv will increase resistance to suspension movement due to pedaling forces, but reduce small bump sensitivity at the same time, play with the setting, as long as you dont go below 55psi, to find waht you like. Rebound is also a personal choice, as starting point is to compress your suspension while sitting, and if your butt comes off the seat, increase rebound damping (ie, make rebound slower). From the rooty conditions you described, you will probably need a faster rebound so your suspension can extend quickly enough to deal with a lot of bumps in succession, if it's too slow over a fast rooty section you suspension will pack up and feel like a rigid due to not extending fast enough to take the next hit.

    2) Check on the chain first, the brakes and suspension should be fine. Just set it up and go ride.

    5) Sounds like you're already pretty well protected, just change the amount of protection you wear as you see fit.
    Quote Originally Posted by Owler
    Do not dispute right of way with a tree.

  7. #7
    s62
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    Thanks, guys! More really good info...
    So, a silly newbie question:
    What is stroke length? How do I measure it?

    Thanks for your time! Also, more info from more people is appreciated! I'm feeling better and better about this. Thanks!

  8. #8
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    Edit you already have a chain tool. Ignore me.

    Get a nice fat camelback with as much water capacity as possible. Preferably one with lots of pockets for all your tools, phone, food etc.

  9. #9
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    Shock stroke is the travel of the shock's shaft. For the front fork it is actually the suspension travel.
    For the rear shock it is NOT the suspension travel. It may be written on the shock itself. Also, you may just measure it - it is length of the shaft from the end(not from the bolt, but from where the round section ends) to the body of shock when the bike is under no load.
    There are standard shock strokes. For info on Manitou, look here:
    http://www.hbsuspension.com/items.as...d=12&itemid=37

  10. #10
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    Tell me how it rides, i've been looking at buying that same bike from a local store.

  11. #11
    s62
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    Will do If it's at a store, though, you should be able to ride it. However, I'll let you know how it feels out on the mountains

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