Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 36
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    56

    need input on all mountain bikes

    going to be getting into single track riding with some friends who are very serious riders, it will take me a while to get up to anywhere near their level, but I'm going to start looking for a good bike as I have some time to look (recovering from ACL/MCL reconstruction)

    most of them are riding Turner six packs...older ones with the Horst link and swear by them. they say the tall BB clearance (lots of trees and boulders to ride over) and coil suspension is what I want. There are a lot of hills here and they spend as much time climbing as desending, and they say the six pack is a great climber for such a good allmountian/freeride bike. the problem is I only have around $1500 to get started. and these bikes in good condition seam to be more around $2500....if you can find one.

    I found a 2011 Trek scratch 7 for a decent price, but don't know much about the bike besides it comes with good coil suspension. how is this bike when pedaling up hill? bottom bracket height?

    There is also a 2011 Fezzari nebo peak at a great price (not coil suspension), and some Specialized Enduro comp's on ebay in my price range. I don't know much about any of these bikes, but my buddy seems bent on Turner...I'm sure for good reason....but finding one in my price range seems like it could be tough.

    Any input is much appreciated.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jtnord's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    521
    Common AM bikes for NJ include: SC Blur LT, SC Nomad, Spesh Enduro, Spesh Stumpjumper and Trek Scratch.

    Im sure Im missing a few but these are very common and very good bikes from big name manufacturers. This means you can easily find them for cheap. These bikes generally arent spec'd with coil but could all be setup that way. Keep in mind that air suspension has come a long way since the Turner Six Pack (05'/06') and is no longer required for a good plush setup. Unless you plan on riding this bike a lot at Mountain Creek I think you are better off saving 2+ lbs with a modern air suspension. If you are planning on riding at Mountain Creek, you will have much more fun renting a DH bike.

    Good luck in your search!
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nauc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,607
    id save up a bit more, and get a Santa Cruz Heckler DAM ($2099). SC has been making them for like 18 years. theyre super reliable, low maintenance, and get lots of love, esp for the money. they come with a five year warranty, lifetime bearing warranty (awesome!), and No-Fault Replacement, which is...

    "Santa Cruz Bicycles will make replacement parts available to the original owner at a minimal charge in the event of a crash or other non-warranty situation for the life of the bike."

    Santa Cruz Bicycles HECKLER

    $1500 could get you a used AM bike, but who knows when it will fail, and you probably wont have any kind of warranty

    ps, and no, i have no kind of connection with SC. i dont even have a SC bike, but id like to
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    get a Santa Cruz Heckler DAM ($2099).
    I have heard good things about santa cruz, but I would think a new bike at this price would have some pretty entry level components, I don't really know anything about bike, but these guys with the Turners tell me that fox is way better than anything from rock shocks....

    while it may be true that an entry level bike is all I need given my lack of skills, I prefer to buy a bike that I won't grow out of. still looks like a great bike at that price.

  5. #5
    Let the good times roll.
    Reputation: miniwisejosh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,158
    Don't choose suspension just based on the company. Compare specific models and dampers. Fox is only one of several companies making quality suspension components. Rockshox, X-Fusion, Marzocchi, and BOS all make solid alternatives for the Fox 36 series AM forks. The X-Fusion Vengeance HLR is currently my favorite in that category. And although I am personally a coil fanboi, I will say that air is not necessarily bad if you get a well designed product and learn how to adjust it properly.

    The Trek Scratch may be a bit overkill if your terrain is mild. However, it is the most fun bike I've ever ridden on rough trails. Price is the main reason I didn't buy one immediately on the spot at the demo event. Addressing your specific questions, I thought it climbed very well for 7" of travel. The BB height felt a bit tall to me, but not enough to be unbalanced in corners. If you don't get that Scratch, pass the ad on to me because I might be interested. Seriously. I've been looking on and off on classifieds to find one for a price I can afford. Actual specs are on this page:
    Trek Scratch Air 8 - Tested - Pinkbike

    Specialized Enduro is a great bike, but the BB is rather low. Not the best choice if avoiding pedal strikes is a priority for you. The Titus El Guapo, my current bike, is even worse for that. Very nice in corners, but the pedals love to catch things. For high BB, check out the GT Sanction. I had one briefly and enjoyed it except it was too tall and long for me. It's one of the best climbing 6" bikes around with excellent suspension for both up and down. There are a few for decent prices on Pinkbike.

    Good luck with your recovery!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    22
    Heckler!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    117
    Sounds like your friends might be a bit biased towards Turner, Fox, and coil suspension in general... Air suspension IMO is very comparable to coil now as far as feel, but it's much more adjustable (without having to change springs out or anything like that) and it's lighter. If you're doing equal amounts of climbing and descending, I'd personally go with air suspension just to save some weight. As far as suspension companies go, Fox, Rockshox, and X-Fusion's products are all very similar in quality and performance, but Fox seems to be the more pricey/overhyped option. X-Fusion is a newer company, but I've heard nothing but good things about them. Another thing that you're going to want to decide is how much travel you want and whether or not you want a bike more oriented to all mountain or freeride. The Trek Scratch is a bit more of a freeride bike because it's pretty slack and has a 180mm fork, etc. You might check out the Trek Remedy. It would be much better at climbing and you could always put a 160mm travel fork on it so it'd be good on descents.

  8. #8
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,672
    Your friends sound like they know what they like, and they aren't wrong. But these kinds of bikes have gotten a lot better in the last 5 years or so. So has air suspension. Think of your friends as audiophiles who swear by vinyl LPs. Personally, I can't hear the difference, and my iPod is a lot more convenient.

    It's hard to give blanket advice on the Spec Enduro, since it's changed a lot from year to year. I don't think they sell the Pitch anymore, but that was a well-reviewed everyman's Enduro that came with a surprisingly good fork. Since it retailed for less than $2K if you find one used, it should be pretty reasonable.

    You should be able to find something that you'll be happy with in the $1,500 range. Watch the classifieds on Pinkbike too, since it seems like more AM bikes show up there than here.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

    Riding in Helena? Everything you need to know, right here.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nauc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,607
    Quote Originally Posted by katoom400 View Post
    I have heard good things about santa cruz, but I would think a new bike at this price would have some pretty entry level components, I don't really know anything about bike, but these guys with the Turners tell me that fox is way better than anything from rock shocks....

    while it may be true that an entry level bike is all I need given my lack of skills, I prefer to buy a bike that I won't grow out of. still looks like a great bike at that price.
    the Heckler is no joke. it may not be a $5,000+ Turner, with Fox parts, but you dont have to spend $5,000+ to get a nice AM bike either.
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mountain Cycle Shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,865
    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    id save up a bit more, and get a Santa Cruz Heckler DAM ($2099). SC has been making them for like 18 years. theyre super reliable, low maintenance, and get lots of love, esp for the money. they come with a five year warranty, lifetime bearing warranty (awesome!), and No-Fault Replacement, which is...

    "Santa Cruz Bicycles will make replacement parts available to the original owner at a minimal charge in the event of a crash or other non-warranty situation for the life of the bike."

    Santa Cruz Bicycles HECKLER

    $1500 could get you a used AM bike, but who knows when it will fail, and you probably wont have any kind of warranty

    ps, and no, i have no kind of connection with SC. i dont even have a SC bike, but id like to
    What this guy said! And go with quality air fork and shock, it more tuneable, and a lot lighter.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mountain Cycle Shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,865
    Quote Originally Posted by katoom400 View Post
    I have heard good things about santa cruz, but I would think a new bike at this price would have some pretty entry level components, I don't really know anything about bike, but these guys with the Turners tell me that fox is way better than anything from rock shocks....

    while it may be true that an entry level bike is all I need given my lack of skills, I prefer to buy a bike that I won't grow out of. still looks like a great bike at that price.
    Fox shocks suck! Go with an X-fusion or a RS monarch shock.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    213
    Might want to look into Ibis as well. They make solid bikes (all carbon), and I'm sure you can find some used that will be within your price range although it may be a few years old. I would definitely search for something used, maybe a SC Blur Lt that is on the lighter side of the scales. Trust me, you're going to want something that can pedal if your going to be climbing up to the top! Besides you would be amazed at how little travel you really need.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    56
    thanks for all of the responses guys. I have some time to keep looking since it will be about 4 months before I'm able to pedal off road, just pedaling on road right now for rehab (like watching paint dry).....but still better than the stationary bike.

    anyway, I know a lot of this group is turner/fox bias, and I know they have done their homework as I ride dirtbikes with them, and we are very picky about our setups. That's why I turned to them for some advice on the bikes. They also have no problem dropping 5k on a bicycle. I can't swing that.....

    I actually found a Fezzari Nebo Peak at a great price, but when I looked up the specs, it seems like the bb is way low.

    The scratch looks like it has great specs, but I'm not sure on climbing ability of the bike?

    The one guy who is the Turner guru told me that he loved the specialized enduro if it wasn't for the low BB.

    when we ride dirt bikes, we make some very technical rocky single track, and I know these guys do the same for the bicycles . Here is a link to give you an idea of what they ride.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxBt7vJMSfY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSDiBWZd2ck

  14. #14
    Let the good times roll.
    Reputation: miniwisejosh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,158
    Wow, those trails look like FUN! Where are they? I can see why your friends don't recommend a low BB. I might have kept my GT Sanction if I lived there.

    What about hardtails? I think the On One 465, DB Mason or similar would be great for what I see in those videos. Rear suspension doens't help me much in low speed tech terrain, and sometimes I even feel like it holds me back. Plus you'd have an easier time finding something in your desired price rance.

    The Trek Scratch feels similar to the Enduro on climbs as far as suspension. Main difference is the Scratch seems to bave a bit shorter top tube for the same size.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by miniwisejosh View Post
    Wow, those trails look like FUN! Where are they?.
    Northern NJ

  16. #16
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,173
    Quote Originally Posted by katoom400 View Post
    going to be getting into single track riding with some friends who are very serious riders, it will take me a while to get up to anywhere near their level, but I'm going to start looking for a good bike as I have some time to look (recovering from ACL/MCL reconstruction)

    most of them are riding Turner six packs...older ones with the Horst link and swear by them. they say the tall BB clearance (lots of trees and boulders to ride over) and coil suspension is what I want. There are a lot of hills here and they spend as much time climbing as desending, and they say the six pack is a great climber for such a good allmountian/freeride bike. the problem is I only have around $1500 to get started. and these bikes in good condition seam to be more around $2500....if you can find one.

    I found a 2011 Trek scratch 7 for a decent price, but don't know much about the bike besides it comes with good coil suspension. how is this bike when pedaling up hill? bottom bracket height?

    There is also a 2011 Fezzari nebo peak at a great price (not coil suspension), and some Specialized Enduro comp's on ebay in my price range. I don't know much about any of these bikes, but my buddy seems bent on Turner...I'm sure for good reason....but finding one in my price range seems like it could be tough.

    Any input is much appreciated.
    Your friends are way too brand obsessed for their advice to be taken seriously.

    There is no reason whatsoever to state that Fox are better then what the others offer at the higher ends.

    Turner bikes are great (I love my 2011 5-Spot) but to insist that you need one is just plain stupid. There are LOADS of other good options out there.

    Coil is a perfectly viable option, but keep in mind that when looking at newer bikes comparable to the 6-Pack, most will come with air. Looking for just coil may end up putting you on a bigger bike than you need. Of course, many bikes out there can run either, so depending on the particular frame you can always switch.

    I will say that for an area like northern NJ where you will spend a lot of time pedaling over and climbing very rocky/rooty trails, I would opt for something other then a high/forward single pivot design like the Heckler. Don't get me wrong, the design is good (I rode them for years) but your particular area is one where they are the most challenged, as they do not stay active under pedaling. If I lived there I would want a suspension that was on the "more active" side when being pedaled. It is actually for this reason that I wouldn't suggest the newer 5-Spot.

    I would not rule out the Enduro. That frame would be a very good choice actually (among many)
    Last edited by kapusta; 01-28-2013 at 01:52 PM.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    56
    from what I can find, it looks like the enduro has a decent BB height.....

    05 Turner 6-pack: 361.95mm
    05 Turner 5-spot: 336.55mm
    08 Spec Enduro: 355.00mm
    10 Trek Scrach7: 367.79mm (for the coil version)

    the local Fazzari Nebo, was the lowest of all at 317.5mm

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Hangtime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,290
    If you can find a used RFX, 6Pack or 5Spot in your price range you'll be on a great bike. I regret selling my 05' Spot. But don't shy away from other brands. One of the toughest bikes I've owned was a Kona Stinky. I would not rule out the Coiler as a quality AM bike. They can be found with both air or coil set ups. Kona make very sturdy frames. Just a thought.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    56
    been looking at an 08 enduro sl comp, can anyone confirm the bb height for this year? I can't seem to find it online.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    11
    I'll go ahead and throw it out there. How bout the Trek Remedy. With a proper build it can be a very capable bike with good climbing attributes. I have owned each year since they came out and love the bike. I run a Lyrik up front and a sturdy build. Last years bike weighed 28lbs and worked from local trails, jump spots and, resort days. If you like a higher bb the remedy sits at 13.9 with a 150 fork, 14.1 with a 160 fork.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,603
    Those trails look fun.

    I agree with others that there are probably dozens of bikes on the market that would be completely at home on those trails. Probably anything in the "trail" or AM class would be more than adequate. I also agree that limiting yourself to a certain brand might make things more difficult to find yourself the bike you want. For example, I would love to ride my Enduro on those trails, but I'm not saying it would be better than any number of bikes.

    Since you don't have a bike yet, I'd say find one and get riding. I often think that newer riders stress out too much about finding the 'right' bike. Seeking just the right Turner or whatever your friends like might cost you lots of time that could be spent riding and figuring out what works for you. Virtually any bike will survive those trails, and will let you get a practical feel for what you are looking for in a bike.

    Good luck!
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    56
    sorry I've been away for a bit, been rehabing the knee with the new road bike I bought to pass the time untill I can pedal off road....

    back looking for a trail bike and I do see a few local options in my price range:

    1. 2011 trek fuel ex7
    2. there are a few specialized stump jumber fsr's in my price range
    3. there is a spesh enduro (2008) although I've heard bad things about the e150 fork

    Turners are still hard to find...there are 2 6 packs available on the west coast right now.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,368
    As others have told you, don't get too obsessed with brands. Turner makes great bikes, I am on my second one. That said, there are plenty of other manufactures that make great bikes and given your budget, you should be focusing more on finding a well cared for used bike in your price range than the brand.

    If looking used, I would expand my search to include the Yeti 575, Giant Reign, Kona Dawg, and Santa Cruz Blur LT, Butcher, and Heckler. As others have said, Fox is not the end all, be all. Rockshox, Marzocchi, Manitour, Magura, and x-fusion all make good forks; the model is more important than the make.

    In regard to the Enduro, that was a great bike, assuming the fork works well. I would spend some time on the specialized forum seeing if they were able to get the kinks worked out with that fork.

    Finally, you should strongly consider the recommendation that several people made to save a little more and buy a new Santa Cruz Heckler. The DAM build at $2099 is a great value with durable components. All you are giving up over more expensive components is some weight, the bike will weight a few pounds more. While used can get you some great deals, it can also get you a bike that is worn out, has broken components, or has other problems. It is one thing if you know bikes, how to carefully check and repair them, quite another if you make a poor purchase and then have to pay a shop to fix/replace parts. A new bike gives you a good starting point where you can learn to do your maintenance and deal with things as they wear out and/or break.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mountain Cycle Shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,865
    ^ And then buy something more expensive a couple years down the road, if you're still into it. Or, upgrade with lighter parts. The Heckler is a great bike.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    56
    Yes, I was looking at the heckler but changed directions after reading this earlier post:

    "I will say that for an area like northern NJ where you will spend a lot of time pedaling over and climbing very rocky/rooty trails, I would opt for something other then a high/forward single pivot design like the Heckler. Don't get me wrong, the design is good (I rode them for years) but your particular area is one where they are the most challenged, as they do not stay active under pedaling. If I lived there I would want a suspension that was on the "more active" side when being pedaled. It is actually for this reason that I wouldn't suggest the newer 5-Spot."

    looks like a new Trek fuel ex7 is priced similarly to the heckler at just over 2k......I actually have my eye on a used trek fuel ex7 that was only ridden a few times and is within my budget.....but I'll start looking at the santa cruz line again......

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •