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Thread: need educating

  1. #1
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    need educating

    So in a nutshell, I discovered my love for mtb-ing in Oct. when I met a new guy. I wrecked his son's bike which I had started riding, bent a rim on a tree, and so I bought my own bike. I dumped the guy, and now have a bike that I don't know much about. I want to start packing tools with me on my rides. I usually do about 12-15 miles once or twice a week over rooty trails, 10-14mph average. I'm not always alone, but I prefer to be prepared if I am. I read in another post it's best to buy tools as needed. I found another article where a bike mechanic listed everything he rides with. I am trying to keep cost down for now, but not buy crap either. I'm shopping on amazon and going by ratings.

    I have attached pictures of my bike, and a list of tools I am considering purchasing to carry with me on rides. I am mechanically inclined with cars, but have never worked on bicycles. I know I have a decent bike, and want to keep it well maintained. I welcome any input on regular preventative maintenance (or anything else for that matter), whether it's a video or other forum posts I over looked.

    Here's what I plan to carry in my pack:

    -Replacement tube
    -mini pump that fits presta valves: Kitbest Aluminum Alloy Portable Bike Floor Pump ($12.98)
    -tire levers (pedro's $4.36)
    -patch kit with cement ($4.20)
    -leatherman multi-tool and a bike multi tool (already have these)
    -wrench with 8mm hex since bike tool didn't come with one (looking at this one: Park Tool CCW-5 Crank Bolt Wrench ($10.76)
    -zip ties and duct tape

    I also want to buy a shock pump to use at home, or keep in the car, but I'm puzzled which one to buy. Here is one I am considering: Fox Racing Shox Shock Pump 027-00-007 ($23.70)

    Also, I want to keep some chain lube on hand, what do you think of this stuff? I ride off trail only on this bike, which is what this lube is recommended for: Finish Line DRY Teflon Bicycle Chain Lube ($12.99 - 8oz)

    -Chain repair links/pins (I am lost as to which kind)-I have a 10x2 gear set up, so I'm guessing that makes it a 20 speed? and it has an SRAM PC1031 chain. (see pictures)
    --What tool should I carry so I can repair a chain on the trail?? I have seen multiple answers, so this confuses me.

    I appreciate your help and input. Like I said, I want to buy cheap, but not crap for the time being...once I start riding more, I plan to invest in better tools.

    Thanks ahead of time
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  2. #2
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    Many bike multi-tools come with a chain breaker and an 8mm hex. If it's not too late, I would suggest returning the multi-tool you have and exchanging it for one that includes the above.

    You have a 10-speed chain, so be sure your repair links are also 10-speed. (You are correct in stating that your bike has 20 speeds, however.) Your friendly local bike shop should have a spare length of chain they could throw your way. You will also need some Power/Missing Links.

    I don't ride with a shock pump, but some do. Same goes for duct tape and zip ties.

    I use the same lube, but I ride in the dry and dusty Intermountain West. Ask friends and folks you see on your trails what they use and go with that.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by misspeabodi View Post
    So in a nutshell, I discovered my love for mtb-ing in Oct. when I met a new guy. I wrecked his son's bike which I had started riding, bent a rim on a tree, and so I bought my own bike. I dumped the guy, and now have a bike that I don't know much about. I want to start packing tools with me on my rides. I usually do about 12-15 miles once or twice a week over rooty trails, 10-14mph average. I'm not always alone, but I prefer to be prepared if I am. I read in another post it's best to buy tools as needed. I found another article where a bike mechanic listed everything he rides with. I am trying to keep cost down for now, but not buy crap either. I'm shopping on amazon and going by ratings.

    I have attached pictures of my bike, and a list of tools I am considering purchasing to carry with me on rides. I am mechanically inclined with cars, but have never worked on bicycles. I know I have a decent bike, and want to keep it well maintained. I welcome any input on regular preventative maintenance (or anything else for that matter), whether it's a video or other forum posts I over looked.

    Here's what I plan to carry in my pack:

    -Replacement tube
    -mini pump that fits presta valves: Kitbest Aluminum Alloy Portable Bike Floor Pump ($12.98)
    -tire levers (pedro's $4.36)
    -patch kit with cement ($4.20)
    -leatherman multi-tool and a bike multi tool (already have these)
    -wrench with 8mm hex since bike tool didn't come with one (looking at this one: Park Tool CCW-5 Crank Bolt Wrench ($10.76)
    -zip ties and duct tape

    I also want to buy a shock pump to use at home, or keep in the car, but I'm puzzled which one to buy. Here is one I am considering: Fox Racing Shox Shock Pump 027-00-007 ($23.70)

    Also, I want to keep some chain lube on hand, what do you think of this stuff? I ride off trail only on this bike, which is what this lube is recommended for: Finish Line DRY Teflon Bicycle Chain Lube ($12.99 - 8oz)

    -Chain repair links/pins (I am lost as to which kind)-I have a 10x2 gear set up, so I'm guessing that makes it a 20 speed? and it has an SRAM PC1031 chain. (see pictures)
    --What tool should I carry so I can repair a chain on the trail?? I have seen multiple answers, so this confuses me.

    I appreciate your help and input. Like I said, I want to buy cheap, but not crap for the time being...once I start riding more, I plan to invest in better tools.

    Thanks ahead of time
    You've got it covered for the most part. I usually carry a small first aid kit and spare shifter cable in addition to what you list. Also, missing/quick links like hdparrish noted.

    And Finish Line dry works great in wet conditions. I use it where I ride, NC/SC.

    Sent from my MotoG3 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    I've used my chain tool once on my bike and lent it out once in 30 years of mountain biking so probably not that important that you have it.

    What I like to carry is a slime tube and not rely on a patch kit. If you don't find what punctured your tube in your tire you'll get another flat unless you have sealant, so the slime tube, although heavy, is great insurance and gets you going again a lot faster than gluing on a patch. The patch kit for me is just extra insurance.
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  5. #5
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    misspeabodi, you've addressed numerous topics and questions into one posting. No doubt, youíll likely receive some opinionated thoughts on some reasonably subjective questions. Questioning the best chain lube can often bring out views and judgments like a full moon can bring out some rather odd personalities.

    You appear to be on-track with what you would like to carry during you rides. You also mentioned wanting to keep it maintained. More specifically, you mentioned preventative maintenance. That should be one of your key objectives. So, if performing your own maintenance is a key interest, then learning how your ride mechanically functions should come a first priority. Only by understanding the function and operation can you understand how to properly maintain it.
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  6. #6
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    Bike History?

    I'm guessing that you bought your bike used?

    Do you know the mileage or maintenance history?

    Knowing this is a good start for knowing what needs to be done next. It allows you to prioritize what tools, instructions or documentation and skills might be necessary for that next task. If dollars are in need of being stretched for specific tasks and there are needed tools, then sometimes you need to learn to be resourceful and determine where you can compromise and where you can't.
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  7. #7
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    Great start! You'll probably pare down what you carry over time. I carry a tube, lever, mini pump, mini-too with breaker, spare quick link. I also carry a few Park Tool stick-on patches as a backup and will use a dollar bill, gel wrapper etc to boot a tire if needed.

    Side note: Your front caliper appears to be mounted using an assortment of spacers and spherical washers. It's probably OK as is but I believe it should be mounted using an adapter. I believe it'd be a Shimano F180P/P2.
    Do the math.

  8. #8
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    I keep a full tool box, tubes and a floor pump back at my truck, but on the bike all I carry is a small gerber multi tool https://www.amazon.com/Gerber-Grylls.../dp/B004DT2912 a Park multi tool, Park Tool I-Beam 2 Mini Tool IB2 | Chain Reaction Cycles and a patch pack Park Tool Super Patch Kit GP-2 | Chain Reaction Cycles and I have a pump similar to this on the bike. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01GPDFYK6...765RBS8P&psc=1 Of course if you are running tubeless the patches aren't useful.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Great start! You'll probably pare down what you carry over time. I carry a tube, lever, mini pump, mini-too with breaker, spare quick link. I also carry a few Park Tool stick-on patches as a backup and will use a dollar bill, gel wrapper etc to boot a tire if needed.

    Side note: Your front caliper appears to be mounted using an assortment of spacers and spherical washers. It's probably OK as is but I believe it should be mounted using an adapter. I believe it'd be a Shimano F180P/P2.
    This is fun! Now that we're on to the topic of the bike, I notice from the position of the O-rings that the fork and shock aren't moving very much. (I guess that's why you, the OP, are buying a shock pump.) It looks to me like you need a lot less air in both the rear shock and fork. (A tip. When you let air out bounce on the bike to equalize pressure in the negative chambers before you set the sag.). I have the opposite problem -- too much sag causing too much sag.
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
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  10. #10
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    Here's something that's been missed so far, a how-to class for bike repair and maintenance.

    REI and many bike shops offer free clinics on bike repair and maintenance that will help you better understand exactly what you have to do for your bike to keep it running smoothly. This will also give you a better idea of what tools you may need.

    Another point; welcome to the wonderful world of mountain biking!
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  11. #11
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    Did you fix the kids bike? Just wondering...

  12. #12
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    I'm thinkin' the OP has departed the scene.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave View Post
    I've used my chain tool once on my bike and lent it out once in 30 years of mountain biking so probably not that important that you have it.

    What I like to carry is a slime tube and not rely on a patch kit. If you don't find what punctured your tube in your tire you'll get another flat unless you have sealant, so the slime tube, although heavy, is great insurance and gets you going again a lot faster than gluing on a patch. The patch kit for me is just extra insurance.
    Cool beans! I like your thoughts on this, and you make a good point. I went ahead and bought the slime tube, with the patch kit!

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    Awesome! Thank you for the suggestions, and the welcome! I love this sport...can't believe I've been missing out on it. And the funny part is, I moved to MS from CO, and and didn't find mtb til I left the mountains. go figure LOL

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by armii View Post
    I keep a full tool box, tubes and a floor pump back at my truck, but on the bike all I carry is a small gerber multi tool https://www.amazon.com/Gerber-Grylls.../dp/B004DT2912 a Park multi tool, Park Tool I-Beam 2 Mini Tool IB2 | Chain Reaction Cycles and a patch pack Park Tool Super Patch Kit GP-2 | Chain Reaction Cycles and I have a pump similar to this on the bike. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01GPDFYK6...765RBS8P&psc=1 Of course if you are running tubeless the patches aren't useful.
    Ok cool! Yeah, I have a gerber, just ordered the patch kit, found out a little compact pump I have will do the presta valves, so I am good. Thank you again for your feedback!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by iforgotmename View Post
    Did you fix the kids bike? Just wondering...
    Well, we were still dating when I bent the rim, he went ahead and fixed it. I did offer to repair it and pay for it but he insisted. But that was the kicker where I really wanted to get my own bike. I never really liked the idea of using it, but it was what my options were at the time. Needless to say, I am happy to have my own bike now.

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    Right on...I was planning on keeping the shock pump in my car with the regular pump...mainly just to check it before I ride. Thank you for your feedback. I ended up asking my ex about his lube, and found something different out here. It's in a gold bottle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    I'm thinkin' the OP has departed the scene.
    I'm still here, just stayed busy this weekend, then I couldn't access the forum on my phone...anyways, I am soo appreciative of everyone's replies and suggestions. I am heading to my local bike shop where I bought the bike today, to see what they have to share with me, and to see if they offer any bike classes. Thank you again

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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave View Post
    This is fun! Now that we're on to the topic of the bike, I notice from the position of the O-rings that the fork and shock aren't moving very much. (I guess that's why you, the OP, are buying a shock pump.) It looks to me like you need a lot less air in both the rear shock and fork. (A tip. When you let air out bounce on the bike to equalize pressure in the negative chambers before you set the sag.). I have the opposite problem -- too much sag causing too much sag.
    Ok cool...I know what you're referring to, but I will need a hands-on explanation of this...I will definitely bring this up when I visit the bike shop. I am starting to understand the mechanics of the bike, but I am not totally quite there yet.

    Thanks for the tip!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    I'm guessing that you bought your bike used?

    Do you know the mileage or maintenance history?

    Knowing this is a good start for knowing what needs to be done next. It allows you to prioritize what tools, instructions or documentation and skills might be necessary for that next task. If dollars are in need of being stretched for specific tasks and there are needed tools, then sometimes you need to learn to be resourceful and determine where you can compromise and where you can't.
    I bought this used, it was a demo bike that I bought through the bike shop...I knew nothing about it when I bought it, but from what I understand, I got a killer deal...so that and just in general, is why I want to maintain it. i have a decent chunk of money invested and don't want that going down the drain just because I didn't take the time to learn about my bike and maintenance. Thank you for the input...

  21. #21
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    So how's the new 'killer deal' ride working out for you?
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  22. #22
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    In close to 3 years of riding, the only tool I've needed & carry is my multi tool. If I've had a spill, I'll use it to loosen stem & straighten bars.

    Otherwise, I've never carried/needed anything else o_0

    I keep meaning to carry a tube... but, I always run tires with extra built in protection.

    As I'm now riding an AM HT 29er I might get one of those frame bags that fit in the front triangle... or, I may not.

    NB, I'm anal about keeping my mule clean, lubed & dialed.

    I count this as good prevention measures.

    Constantly check your bike...

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    I
    NB, I'm anal about keeping my mule clean, lubed & dialed.

    I count this as good prevention measures.

    Constantly check your bike...
    Indeed.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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