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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm My Stumpy FSR--will it holdup?

    So I got this bike in April and am loving it. I ride aggressively but within my limits--3-5 foot drops, brutally rocky and steep descents where I can find them, twisty single-track. I have to bail sometimes and have crashed twice (once into a tree) but not at very high speed.

    I got the Stumpy because I wanted a lightweight do-it-all bike. I might even take it on some lift-chair stuff if I can find time later this summer.

    But my question is: Will it hold up to what I'm doing? Anyone have a lot of experience with the 06?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by madgeronimo
    So I got this bike in April and am loving it. I ride aggressively but within my limits--3-5 foot drops, brutally rocky and steep descents where I can find them, twisty single-track. I have to bail sometimes and have crashed twice (once into a tree) but not at very high speed.

    I got the Stumpy because I wanted a lightweight do-it-all bike. I might even take it on some lift-chair stuff if I can find time later this summer.

    But my question is: Will it hold up to what I'm doing? Anyone have a lot of experience with the 06?

    Thanks.
    Well, like you said, it's a lightweight do-it-all bike. You are getting into Enduro (or Giant Reign or SC Nomad or) territory methinks.

  3. #3
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    Stumpy FSR

    I have an '05 model (120mm travel) i've been doing that sort of thing for ages and it's held up well. I have a couple of mates who are into dirt jumping/trials and after a few mins i usually get lonely on the sidelines and end up getting sucked in. Done up to about 4 or 5 footers,but i wouldn't recommend going any bigger,as said before,it's only lightweight xc/do-it-all bike.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, don't get me wrong, it's not weak, but for very aggressive riding it starts to make sense to get a more burly frame. You don't always need more travel, that's personal preference.

    My thinking is for light FR, a 4X frame might be ideal (blur 4x, Norco 4by, Enduro SX, etc) around 4" travel (enough to take the edge off the big hits), and strong enough to take drops and handle a biggish fork.

  5. #5
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    It will hold up. For the most part. Specialized is good about making things strong and light. I do howerever thing that an enduro might suit you better. The stumpjumper headangle is a little steep IMO for that type of riding. The enduro also just feels more stable. But as for your original question. Yes it will hold up, maybe not the components, but the frame will.

    I would look into the 2007 enduro. lighter than the 06 but still more on the all mountain freeride side.

  6. #6
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    Are you happy with how it performs?

    If so, this is what i would do. Ride it hard. Check for small cracks on a regular basis. If it fails, look into an enduro upgrade through the warranty process, if they will do that for you.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  7. #7
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    I think a lot of people have come to rely on what companies or journalists define as usable for the riding they do. In my opinion, if you are comfortable with the set up, geometry, and so on, and ride smoothly, any equipment will do what you want to do. Years ago, before there were 40-50 lb downhill/freeride specific rides, with overbuilt everything, people were doing the same riding on what was available, lighter bikes meant for XC. Yes, tougher parts will hold up longer and better to the abuse, but there can be a point of overbuilt, where the supposed advntage is gone, it just looks tougher. I only own one bike right now, a 2000 rockhopper pro. I have ridden everything from road commuting, urban, light freeride, and even one location that mgiht as well be DH/FR, as it's nothing but big rocks, drops, and ugly falls. Only thing I broke was a helmet and some cuts and bruises. Now in all fairness, I came from a BMX background (not as much racing, more running around DC suburbs living for jumps, bumps, and adrenalin), so I learned a lot of flow growing up.

    My point is, if you like the steeper angles, the lighter weight, and less travel, then go for it, have fun, and check your ride often for damage and wear. If *YOU* think your ride isn't up to what you are doing, then you have exceeded your comfort level on what you are on, and yes, you need to get something else. Only thing your going to get for sure going to a heavier use specific bike is a set of parts designed to someone else's idea of what shoudl be used for what you are doing. And yeah probably some parts less likely to break, but you can always upgrade to them as they do break.
    There are exactly two states of being....Pink Floyd and Not Pink Floyd.

  8. #8
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    Depends how heavy you are, how often you ride aggressively, how well you land jumps etc, how many times you crash. Who knows how long it will last? It's all common sense. Your bike is certainly at the lightweight end of the AM spectrum so don't expect it to last forever if you start jumping off things and mashing hard through rock gardens, especially if you're a big guy.
    [SIZE="2"]Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine[/SIZE]

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrus
    I think a lot of people have come to rely on what companies or journalists define as usable for the riding they do. In my opinion, if you are comfortable with the set up, geometry, and so on, and ride smoothly, any equipment will do what you want to do. Years ago, before there were 40-50 lb downhill/freeride specific rides, with overbuilt everything, people were doing the same riding on what was available, lighter bikes meant for XC. Yes, tougher parts will hold up longer and better to the abuse, but there can be a point of overbuilt, where the supposed advntage is gone, it just looks tougher. I only own one bike right now, a 2000 rockhopper pro. I have ridden everything from road commuting, urban, light freeride, and even one location that mgiht as well be DH/FR, as it's nothing but big rocks, drops, and ugly falls. Only thing I broke was a helmet and some cuts and bruises. Now in all fairness, I came from a BMX background (not as much racing, more running around DC suburbs living for jumps, bumps, and adrenalin), so I learned a lot of flow growing up.

    My point is, if you like the steeper angles, the lighter weight, and less travel, then go for it, have fun, and check your ride often for damage and wear. If *YOU* think your ride isn't up to what you are doing, then you have exceeded your comfort level on what you are on, and yes, you need to get something else. Only thing your going to get for sure going to a heavier use specific bike is a set of parts designed to someone else's idea of what shoudl be used for what you are doing. And yeah probably some parts less likely to break, but you can always upgrade to them as they do break.
    Amen to that brotha. So basically its not how good the ride is, its how comfortable the ride makes you feel.

  10. #10
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    '06 Stumpy FSR - Triad shock popped on drops

    Hi
    The Triad shock on my 06 FSR Stumpy has burst it seals twice in 2 months and leaked oil out at the compression lever, this was after doing only 2 or 3 5ft drops and 2 or 3 3ft drops.
    Maybe the shock is inherently faulty - the Fox warranty shop advised it failed the 2nd time for 'freak failure' and they 'replaced a load of parts', or maybe the bike isn't designed for this kind of use?
    Anyone else had this issue with their Triad?
    Thanks

  11. #11
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    It sounds like you have in correct air pressures or incorrect oil ammounts. Are you bottoming out the shock on every ride? Do you ride it locked out on downhills?

  12. #12
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    Yeah, even though the Stumpy is not designed for 5-footers, "popping" a Float shock sounds unusual. I wonder about the lockout too...

  13. #13
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    I've also blown out a triad on an 06 Stumpy. The air resevoir was fine, but the damping cartridge was completely blown, leaving an oily mess across the bb shell and pivot. Granted I was riding some jumps, and fairly rugged descents above Pacifica California. I can guarantee the shock pressure was set appropriately, and rebound was set properly. Fox took the shock in and rebuilt it with no questions asked and for no charge. Makes me wonder if this is a common problem.

  14. #14
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    I blew up my Triad on smooth singletrack. After it was fixed, my Triad got stuck down. 8 months later and everything is still good (cross fingers).

  15. #15
    Was that a Bobcat?
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    I agree with uktrailmonster.... your weight and grace on the bike should have a factor on if the bike will take what you throw at it. I have a couple buddies riding this bike and they do push it to the limits with no problems thus far.

  16. #16
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    I weigh 170 with gear and am probably not that graceful, as I am a newbie, just started riding this year seriously. That said, I've had trouble with my rear shock, which got stuck down on me in Oct. Now, I'm noticing that on the replacement/warranty shock, I'm getting too much sag and that the valve is spitting a little oily air whenever I dettach my shock pump.

    Should a Triad be spitting oily air?

    The frame itself has stood up to the drops and jumps thus far. But I do see an Enduro in my future maybe two to three years or so.

  17. #17
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    i've been pushing my '06 SJ for about 5 months and it's held up fine. granted i am a light weight rider at 145lbs full gear and doing 5ft drops almost every ride and no problems yet *knock on wood*. i get too much sag as well on my triad but i think i've fixed that tonight. the triad is probably the weakest link on the SJ line though
    Salsa Dos Niner SS

  18. #18
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    Good replacement shock for Triad

    So I'm pretty sure my Triad won't last long. I'm trying out jumping and drops and crap like that more and more. When the Triad does go, does anyone know of a good replacement Stumpy rear shock?

  19. #19
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    I haven't seen any shocks to the spec of the SJ but if you wanted, get an RP23 and have push work their magic and shorten the stroke to 1.5
    Salsa Dos Niner SS

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by madgeronimo
    So I'm pretty sure my Triad won't last long. I'm trying out jumping and drops and crap like that more and more. When the Triad does go, does anyone know of a good replacement Stumpy rear shock?
    PUSH offers custom sized RP3 and RP23 shocks for the Stumpy with their PUSH magic included. This came from LOTS of complaints about the performance of the Triad. The PUSH shocks run about $500+ so they ain't cheap.

    The Stumpy is a great bike but the Triad is really the weak link. Although it does offer lockout, propedal, and open, none of these modes work very well. An odd bob occurs on lockout (yeah, figure that one out ), open is just not very plush and tends to blow through the travel, and propedal is open with the valve half closed.

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