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  1. #1
    fuggansonofahowa
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    Must Haves - Ride Essentials

    I've been out of the picture for quite a few years now. It's actually funny that they've brought back some of the 10+ year-old, classic AT/Mud tires (smoke & velociraptor)....anyway, that's not my point in the thread.

    I'm trying to tool up for some heavy, deep-woods technical....walking is last possible option, and weight is not the number one priority (although the lighter the better). FYI, my new ride is SRAM drivetrain (X9), Manitou air (front and rear), Juicy's, SPD clipless....

    This is what I've got on my list so far:

    Hydration - (Camelback/bottles)
    Extra Dropout (derailer hanger)
    Allen tool
    Chainbreak tool
    Leatherman multi-tool
    spare tube(s)
    spare chain/SRAM power links
    lube
    electrical tape (holds stuff together)
    extra brake pads (not sure on hydraulic wear)


    Anything else that you wouldn't dare hit the trails without?

  2. #2
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    Cell phone. First aid kit.
    In my kit, beside iodine, band aid and bandages, I carry glucose pills. Also, it would be a good idea to have at least 1 bottle of ice(goes both for hydration and to ice bruises). If you don't carry ice - then freezing spray.
    Zip ties. Tire levers. Patch kit(you never know how many flats you may get on one ride, so even 2 spare tubes may be not enough). If you have sealant in the tubes(what I would strongly recommend, particularly in the summer) - then also a small bottle of acetone and piece of cloth to clean up the tube before patching.

  3. #3
    Gnar
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    Don't forget your pump!

  4. #4
    HIKE!
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    Duct Tape in addition to (or instead of) electrical tape.

  5. #5
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    More stuff for long days

    I always take a jacket (wind/waterproof). I usually carry a skull cap in since most of your body heat is lost through your head.

    Some other things to consider that weren't mentioned in previous posts.

    A tire boot or emergency boot (large patch) for tire failures.

    Pinch light (keychain light).

    Lighter / fire starting kit.

    Latex gloves for chain repairs and/or first aid.

    Sunscreen packets.

    Small bottle of chain lube.

    Bug repellent.

    Of course your hydration pack can get pretty heavy, so it is still a matter of personal choice how much stuff to bring.

  6. #6
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    extra cables, shock pump if you have air shocks, headlamp if you tend to push a bit too far...

  7. #7
    fuggansonofahowa
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Fuel
    Don't forget your pump!
    DOH!

    Excellent suggestions. The first aid kit is also something I always have...just didn't post. Self-sealing (slime) tubes are relatively inexpensive these days....require investigation on my part.

    Outdoor survival stuff IS crucial (especially for epic all-dayers) - light, repellent, sunscreen, etc.

    Tire/tube patch is a good one. I've been on rides where side-wall blowout turned one rider into a bike haulin' hiker (wouldn't hold tube). A patch would have probably allowed him to nurse the bike back to camp.

    Extra cables make good sense....Is the shock pump worth hauling?

  8. #8
    TNC
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    Wow, some of my riding buddies think I'm over-prepared, but Hawseman I'm not sure you need quite all of that stuff. The derailleur hangar may be overkill...an entire chain is definitely too much, just take a master-link or pin...lube is probably not an issue...and extra pads are not necessary (if you left home with nearly worn out pads, shame on you...LOL!). Now let me state that my suggestions are for general trail riding as your post seems to imply...not some South American jungle death ride...LOL!

    As others have pointed out, a pump is critical, and the suggestion of a boot is equally smart. A boot has saved me a walk on more than one occasion. Extra lube could be an issue for some gawdawful situation of weather and mud, but I don't think I would have headed out during a monsoon for a "regular" ride. The suggestion of a small amount of sunscreen is smart. Longer rides with the real threat of skin cancer down the road is no laughing matter anymore. The suggestion of duct tape over electrical tape is wise. Nascar guys don't call duct tape, "200 mph tape" for nothing. Zip ties are one of the best inventions ever. If you're riding alone, the cell phone...if useable in your riding area...is obviously a smart move. The type of multitool can be an important issue. Get one that can take care of just about every item on your bike...check this before you buy. I also carry a little plastic 35mm film canister with 4 or 5 of the most common and critical bolts/nuts on my bike...insert some foam inside to keep from rattling.

    Of course much of this changes as the ride verges on some kind of killer epic, especially if alone. The most common things that make you walk out are tire issues and drivetrain failure. If you break a chain, it's almost always fixable with links or pins...easy to carry. The extra tube, pump, boot, etc. for the tire issues will almost always address any issue...and if you went into serious cactus country without sealant in your tires, maybe you deserve to die...LOL!

  9. #9
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    in a camleback:
    water (duh)
    2 multitools, one of them foldy allen key things and a gerber multitool
    2 tubes
    1 patch kit
    1 co2 pump
    2 co2 cart.
    master link and chain tool
    fist aid kit with personal info card (name, ssn, address, blood type)
    i like electrical tape (strechy)
    bic lighter (in a zip lock bag)
    map
    and a gerber gator 3 1/2 inch folding blade knife.

    might be over kill for some. i ride alone alot. if you ride in a group maybe cross loading survival gear might help

    oh i forgot, car keys..

  10. #10
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    Don't forget the toilet paper!!

  11. #11
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    Bandanna or snake bite kit. I don't have a snake bite kit, but I carry a bandanna that could be wrapped above a snake bite and slow the spread of venom while getting your ass to the hospital. I hope to never experience this. Oh yeah, the bandanna could serve as TP if called upon.

  12. #12
    fuggansonofahowa
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    Wow, some of my riding buddies think I'm over-prepared, but Hawseman I'm not sure you need quite all of that stuff. The derailleur hangar may be overkill...an entire chain is definitely too much, just take a master-link or pin...lube is probably not an issue...and extra pads are not necessary (if you left home with nearly worn out pads, shame on you...LOL!). Now let me state that my suggestions are for general trail riding as your post seems to imply...not some South American jungle death ride...LOL!

    As others have pointed out, a pump is critical, and the suggestion of a boot is equally smart. A boot has saved me a walk on more than one occasion. Extra lube could be an issue for some gawdawful situation of weather and mud, but I don't think I would have headed out during a monsoon for a "regular" ride. The suggestion of a small amount of sunscreen is smart. Longer rides with the real threat of skin cancer down the road is no laughing matter anymore. The suggestion of duct tape over electrical tape is wise. Nascar guys don't call duct tape, "200 mph tape" for nothing. Zip ties are one of the best inventions ever. If you're riding alone, the cell phone...if useable in your riding area...is obviously a smart move. The type of multitool can be an important issue. Get one that can take care of just about every item on your bike...check this before you buy. I also carry a little plastic 35mm film canister with 4 or 5 of the most common and critical bolts/nuts on my bike...insert some foam inside to keep from rattling.

    Of course much of this changes as the ride verges on some kind of killer epic, especially if alone. The most common things that make you walk out are tire issues and drivetrain failure. If you break a chain, it's almost always fixable with links or pins...easy to carry. The extra tube, pump, boot, etc. for the tire issues will almost always address any issue...and if you went into serious cactus country without sealant in your tires, maybe you deserve to die...LOL!
    TNC...appreciate the input.

    A spare derailleur hangar is critical, IMHO. Many a-rider in my area (Maine=moutains, mud, sticks, roots, rocks) have had derailler dropouts cleaned out and wished they brought a spare. This is a killer - you're pretty much scarewd.

    The chain thing I can agree with, perhaps a whole replacement is overkill. I've always had an extra, lubed in a freezer bag and never used it after many rides. Of course, we used to ride chains tight (big-to-big - 1 or so). I don't think I'll do that anymore.

    As far as pads - I've burned through a brand new set of V-brake pads on a single weekend day ride. My new rim cost me a pretty penny. I'm not confident with the wear of hydraulics at this point-in-time. We bike uphill for hours, and downhill hard for a fraction of that....hard on brakes. After I learn the wear on my new hydraulics, I may revisit. But at a mear 24g, and tool-less install, I'll bring 'em.

    The case of bolts/pins/nuts/etc. is an excellent idea. I can throw my power link connectors in there (scrapping the whole chain).

    @f00lzBurden - personal info is good for those solo trips...saves on having to do DNA tests or check dental records.

    @GETSTUPID - How can I argue that...nothing worse than riding on an MTB saddle with an unclean a$$....can ruin some good riding shorts.

  13. #13
    Glad to Be Alive
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    derailler cable
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  14. #14
    TNC
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    Derailleur cable?

    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    derailler cable
    Bob, what would you do with a derailleur cable?...you don't know how to install that thing. Well...I guess once you realized you were gonna die in the wilderness because you couldn't shift your gears, you could hang yourself from the nearest tree with that cable.

    No...wait...use that cable to make a snare about neck high on the trail and just ambush the next rider, take his bike, and ride home.

    Just kidding, Bob.

    Oh...BTW...that suggestion of toilet paper is one of the most important items that I forgot. I once had to sacrifice a favorite bandana for...well...I'm sure you can guess how it got sacrificed.

  15. #15
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    TP,
    tools,
    Water proof matches
    GPS or Map or both, these I would make a priority on an epic ride!
    Derailleur hanger
    patches
    spare QR rod (I have seen them break before)
    First Aid kit
    tape
    tire irons
    Pepper spray

  16. #16
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    Don't forget a gun.

  17. #17
    fuggansonofahowa
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    I guess that's one way to make it to the finish before your riding buddies.....

  18. #18
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    The gun is actually not a bad idea. Here in Oz it is definitely illegal so I never leave home without a Benchmade folder in my pocket. My wife was trailling me by some 50m on a narrow trail once and had her life threatened by a couple of hoods; luckily she managed to out ride them but if the incident ever repeated itself I swore to ride back and take out the fools. So a tactical knife or a double barrel shot gun (if wearing a large pack) is high on my list of "Ride Essentials"!!!
    Last edited by drmark67; 06-15-2007 at 05:08 AM.
    "Carpe diem, quam minimun credula postero"- Seize the day, trust as little as possible in tomorrow.(Horace)

  19. #19
    TNC
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    Well, if you're gonna be armed...

    At least make it convenient to operate the gun while riding.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  20. #20
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    ^ I didn't see that option on the Santa Cruz website

  21. #21
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    In my camelback:

    (I run Stan's but...)
    two spare tubes

    patch kit

    leather for tire boot (palm of old, leather work/gardening glove)

    a bright orange, fold-up emergency rain coat (a large trash bag will do)

    a couple of sandwich ziplocks (for the cell and gps if it starts raining)

    pills that chemically purify water

    cell phone

    drivers license, credit card, $20 cash, emergency contact info

    a GPS

    area maps

    an extra derailleur (yep - I broke one off one time and with full suspension that has
    "chain growth", there's no way to make it a single-speed. Walking sucks. Now, as an
    alternative, you could pack a singleator instead.) And my extra rear derailleur has
    saved others in group rides.

    two extra hangers

    new cable for front/rear derailleur

    first aid kit with plenty of antiseptic, gauze and tape.

    duct tape

    advil

    Saltstik pills

    multi-tool

    4 or 5 CO2 canisters and a Superflate (with Stan's, you need this)

    A tire pump

    A shock pump

    Alien multi-tool

    A bag full of all possible allen wrenches needed for anything on the bike, including
    the wrench for the star bolts used on disks.

    tiny needlenose pliers

    extra pedal cleats and cleat bolts

    extra pedal parts (Frog clamshells modified to work on either side)

    a small assortment of nuts and bolts

    1 foot of safety wire

    a section of chain, master pins, a couple of the quick links

    cliff bars and goo

    a ziplock with a small, clean, dry towel

    the "e-kit" (a ziplock with some TP)

    gatorade (in a bottle cage on the bike)

    I also usually carry a folding saw for trail maintenance, but on vacations, that's left at home.
    -- Evil Patrick

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    My Videos

    The trail...shall set you free.

  22. #22
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    I keep a back pack tie downs with me in case a turnicate is ever needed. Good way to stop a major bleed or cinch up a compound fracture & tie ya to a couple of tree branches.

  23. #23
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    Hydration - (Camelback/bottles) Bottles
    Extra Dropout (derailer hanger) Nope just bend back for the ride home
    Allen tool Yup, kind with the balls on the end
    Chainbreak tool Yup
    Leatherman multi-tool Yup
    spare tube(s) 1 with a patch kit, and boot I run UST
    spare chain/SRAM power links Shimano pins
    lube Nope needed once on 161 km ride though
    electrical tape (holds stuff together) Nope
    extra brake pads (not sure on hydraulic wear) Nope, rode steel on steel for 20 k though.
    CO2 Air, buddy carrys the pump.
    Emergency energy bar.

    Anything else that you wouldn't dare hit the trails without?

    Lucnh and clothing as required.

    Used it all, always got home on the bike.

    Most runs are 30 km to 80 km say 2.5 hours to 6 hours, in the rockies.

  24. #24
    it's....
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    Cash.

  25. #25
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    Jesus christ evil P, how big is your bag??? That is all essential stuff, but where do you put it?

  26. #26
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    I went to lowes and bought an allen key set, comes like 2.5mm through 10mm. It cost me 5 bucks, I just took out the sizes I don't need because there aren't any fasteners on the bikeof that size....warranty at any lowes, 5 bucks to replace the whole set, and better yet they are meant to be used.

    I don't know how some people use the mini-tool. I know they are for trail, but jeez they break, chrome flakes off and bend and they cost 3 times as much but are sold by crank brothers.

    get your self some tools from home depot/lowes and make yourself a cheap lightweight tool kit...you will thank yourself when you are in the woods, getting dark and you actually have to make a repair, not just play with the multitool

    the micro tools from crank bros, etc. are pure waste of money if you do any real trail repair IMHO...

    DITTO on the bug spray by a previous poster

  27. #27
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    I just started carrying pepper spray. I live in N. California where the mountain lion population is increasing. A few riders have recently been stalked and last year there was that rider in SoCal who had his face eaten off. I usually ride solo. A ranger told me that no person who was by themselves has ever survived an attack. The survivors have always been with other people who typically beat, kicked and dragged the cat off the victim (there's usually a long struggle). But also no cases of someone using pepper spray. I figure if I'm attacked that pepper spray may save my ass. I always carry it my left shorts pocket. This way I know where it is and can pull it out without looking or thinking too hard as I'm fending off the cat. I bought mine at Fry's for $5. Lost one on the first ride because I tried to use the "handy" belt clip. Bad idea. And I don't trust the keychain, which seems flimsy.

    I also carry a tiny bag containing pain killers. This includes aspirin, Advil and Codeine (gasp!) tablets. Codeine is not to be used in the event of head injury since this can be fatal. But when I broke my collar bone in the middle of nowhere, I was wishing I had some of this stuff.

  28. #28
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    I have a small bag of different painkillers and muscle relaxers in my dakine, but I can't remember which ones are which haha, How come nobody ever believes me when I tell them mountain lions HAVE stalked people?? At least I'm not the only one!

  29. #29
    STINKY TOFU
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    great, i never got into surfing because I was deathly afraid of sharks (thanks mom for letting me watch jaws when I was 4)and here I'm thinking that moutain biking would be predator free.

  30. #30
    El Pollo Diablo
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    Knockoff camelbak, filled with:
    Agua
    PBJ/other sandwiches (1-2)
    Ibuprofin
    Park multitool (inc chainbreaker deal)
    Pump
    Spare tube
    Tire levers (2)
    Arm/Elbow pads (seem to get by just fine with shin/knee only... so far at least)

    then, depending on what I'm hitting the mountain on, toss in a bigger wrench for axlebolts on my SS.

  31. #31
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    But Allways

    Take some toilet paper

  32. #32
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    I only bring the bare minimum, as I hate carrying things. If I have a technical problem which cripples my bike, there is a good chance I am walking the rest of the trail. Luckily I've yet to have any major problems with my bike on my regular trips to the 2 trails in my area.

    I bring water, and my riding gear (helmet, gloves, etc) and that's usually it. Sometimes my headlights if its later in the day.
    2013 Cannondale F29 2
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by FisherCraig
    I only bring the bare minimum

    [snip]

    Luckily I've yet to have any major problems with my bike on my regular trips to the 2 trails in my area.

    Are those two rides "heavy, deep-woods technical" where "walking is last possible option"?
    -- Evil Patrick

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    The trail...shall set you free.

  34. #34
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    Wow... you guys pull a trailer to haul all that stuff?
    "Early bird gets the worm", but the second mouse gets the cheese...

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sisco_28601
    Wow... you guys pull a trailer to haul all that stuff?
    No trailer.

    After 10 years of this, please consider the extra weight of the added muscle.



    -- Evil Patrick

    Some of my Music

    My Videos

    The trail...shall set you free.

  36. #36
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    I though I packed heavy but my god some people on here carry allot.

    Water
    Multi Tool
    Patch Kit
    Pump
    Cell Phone
    Food
    Toilet Paper
    Chain Pins.

  37. #37
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    Toilet paper is a good suggestion, but also toss in a few moist towlettes/Wet Ones.. They're good for cleaning wounds.

  38. #38
    Viva Las Peli Taco
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    knob

    Quote Originally Posted by chas_martel
    Don't forget a gun.
    What a knob....

  39. #39
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    A .44 mag or bear spray is essential for anyone here in bear country. The bear spray fits nicely in the bottle cage. The revolver a little more difficult to pack in an accessible way, but they make some sweet scandium and titanium .44s that are a lot easier to pack now.

    We have drawn the .44 once but never had to pull the trigger on the can or the revolver.

  40. #40
    K Lives
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    Hustler Magazine. Or Club International will do. Or on a good day, Private.

  41. #41
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    Easy Solution : Just Ride with Anyone Responding to this Thread...

    ...and let them carry all that crap...

    All I carry is a cell phone and half a Camelbak of water.

  42. #42
    Brackish
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawseman
    I've been out of the picture for quite a few years now. It's actually funny that they've brought back some of the 10+ year-old, classic AT/Mud tires (smoke & velociraptor)....anyway, that's not my point in the thread.

    I'm trying to tool up for some heavy, deep-woods technical....walking is last possible option, and weight is not the number one priority (although the lighter the better). FYI, my new ride is SRAM drivetrain (X9), Manitou air (front and rear), Juicy's, SPD clipless....

    This is what I've got on my list so far:

    Hydration - (Camelback/bottles)
    Extra Dropout (derailer hanger)
    Allen tool
    Chainbreak tool
    Leatherman multi-tool
    spare tube(s)
    spare chain/SRAM power links
    lube
    electrical tape (holds stuff together)
    extra brake pads (not sure on hydraulic wear)


    Anything else that you wouldn't dare hit the trails without?
    If I'm going deep woods in an unfamiliar area then I have a compass and a map with me, a lighter and a rain shell. Oh, and food too. Something like power bars that packs light but will keep you going. I can attest from experience that when all else fails a Clif Bar wrapper will light soggy wood tinder better that just about anything you may find on your person or in your wallet (and trust me, I burned EVERYTHING in my wallet that was flammable the time I found this out). After talking to a guy who got lost on a fairly non-descript local mountain a few years ago and nearly lost his fingers in an unplanned overnight stay, I'd seriously consider a superlight emergency bivy sack that I saw at REI last week, too.

  43. #43
    Brackish
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidelis
    I just started carrying pepper spray. I live in N. California where the mountain lion population is increasing. A few riders have recently been stalked and last year there was that rider in SoCal who had his face eaten off. I usually ride solo. A ranger told me that no person who was by themselves has ever survived an attack.
    From 1996:
    "24 May. 28-year-old Phil Anderson was attacked by an approximately 80 pound mountain lion in Olympic National Park about 20 miles west of Port Angeles, Washington. The lion moved out of the shadows "smoothly and quickly". A mountain biker and wrestler, Anderson first ran backwards but fought when it leapt on his chest. Anderson fell to his back, locked his legs around the cougar, flipped over and buried his thumbs in the animal's throat and choked the cat in and out of consciousness. He kept the front paws pinned back with his forearms. After about two and a half or three minutes, the cat still wriggling, got Anderson's thumb in its mouth and smashed it. That gave the cat the edge. Anderson lost his grip, and the cat's claws went into a whirl and managed to rip through his thick sweatshirt in a couple of places, giving Anderson puncture wounds to the chest. Not wanting more, the lion then fled. Park Rangers declined to hunt down the lion, stating that having so many lions in that area would make it difficult to know which one it was. Source: (Read his account HERE by Mike Dawson, Peninsula Daily News; Sunday, 05/26/96)"

    Soure: http://users.frii.com/mytymyk/lions/attacks2.htm

    I dug up this account because I didn't want to mis-tell the story from my memory, I actually know Phil personally and heard him tell the details. I'm not posting this to refute Fidelis, but just to let it be known that a solo rider can fight back and win. With cougars, if they attack you have to fight and fight hard because they will kill you dead, and quick. Fight for your life and don't give up, then get the hell away (and keep your guard up while you leave). Just don't hope it will end, don't give up and don't resign yourself to failure!

  44. #44
    livin' the dream......
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    other items you may add...........

    remember all the free AOL cd's you used to get in the mail? I keep one of them in my camelback along with the other goodies. This would be very useful if you had to signal a chopper/plane that was trying to locate you. I know this is an unlikely situation, but if it were to happen, it would be good to have. They weigh next to nothing and take up little room.

  45. #45
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    Man, the US must be a lot wilder and dangerous than I imagined.
    I think carrying a gun on a mountainbike would be more dangerous for the rider than all other external possible dangers combined.
    The rattle and bumps on a gnarly downhill could lead the gun to shoot.

    Do any of you guys seriously carry guns?
    I canīt believe this

    Ok, I am european, except for wild dogs, wolves and bears there are no wild animals. Ok maybe there are, but crashing with your bike and braking your neck seems like a thousand times more probable than getting eaten by some beast. Also, over here there are no gangsters and evil doers hiding in the woods.
    Probably more dangerous for street/urban/dirt bikers

    I do carry an extra buff though, nice for the cold and sweaty dhs.
    Greetings Znarf

  46. #46
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    In Alaska they say if you carry a handgun in the backcountry you need to shave the front site off, because when a bear attacks you and you pull the gun the bear will just shove it up your @ss. I don't carry a gun, just stay aware of my surroundings. I do, however, yell "Hey bear! Hey bear!" when I am riding or hike-a-biking in known bear country out here. They really don't want any part of interacting with us, and given the chance will run away rather than confront you.

  47. #47
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    I donīt know much about bears and even a lot less about guns. Iīd guess that a pistol is pretty useless against a bear? At least the bear, if it wants to eat you, will probably be quicker all over you than an average guy could kill a bear with a hand gun (especially if he just pedalled up a really steep hill, shaking and shuddering all over the place- reminds me of Biathlon, except that you risk your life)

    In Germany there was the first wild bear since 40 years. About one week after it was first spotted,some idiot hunter killed it. I mean he probably wasnīt about to starve to death, in Germany there are Restaurants,Stores and even McDonalds literally everywhere.

    greetings Znarf

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidelis
    I always carry it my left shorts pocket. This way I know where it is and can pull it out without looking or thinking too hard as I'm fending off the cat...I also carry a tiny bag containing pain killers. This includes aspirin, Advil and Codeine (gasp!) tablets. Codeine is not to be used in the event of head injury since this can be fatal. But when I broke my collar bone in the middle of nowhere, I was wishing I had some of this stuff.
    You might need those painkillers if you fall on that can of pepper spray. I imagine it is the bear-size can? Try mounting it on your bottle cage - always accessible even while riding and you can't fall on it

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Znarf
    Man, the US must be a lot wilder and dangerous than I imagined.
    I think carrying a gun on a mountainbike would be more dangerous for the rider than all other external possible dangers combined.
    The rattle and bumps on a gnarly downhill could lead the gun to shoot.

    Do any of you guys seriously carry guns?
    I canīt believe this

    Ok, I am european, except for wild dogs, wolves and bears there are no wild animals. Ok maybe there are, but crashing with your bike and braking your neck seems like a thousand times more probable than getting eaten by some beast. Also, over here there are no gangsters and evil doers hiding in the woods.
    Probably more dangerous for street/urban/dirt bikers

    I do carry an extra buff though, nice for the cold and sweaty dhs.
    Greetings Znarf
    I carry one on certain rides as do most of the mtb'ers up here in AK that I know. As Carbuncle pointed out the most important thing is to be observant and to continually make your presence known as you bomb down the trails. At a minimum I carry bearspray. The lightweight .44 is a new thing and typically at least one person in a remote group ride will be packing heat. It is an odds thing and it makes sense - the more time you fly through remote parts of bear country on a bike the more likely if are to have a negative bear encounter. Of course the number of riders in the group and the amount of noise you make has an effect. I will probably never have to use it but it packs well and has many uses in a in a survival situation. It is that one time though, when you come flying around that blind downhill corner, 17 miles from the road, and mama brown bear has just killed a moose calf with her 2 - 2yr cubs right in the middle of the trail that has me carrying a little extra weight. You can't kick a bear and poke at it to get it to retreat like some fortunate people have been able to do with big cats.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Znarf
    I donīt know much about bears and even a lot less about guns. Iīd guess that a pistol is pretty useless against a bear? At least the bear, if it wants to eat you, will probably be quicker all over you than an average guy could kill a bear with a hand gun (especially if he just pedalled up a really steep hill, shaking and shuddering all over the place- reminds me of Biathlon, except that you risk your life)

    In Germany there was the first wild bear since 40 years. About one week after it was first spotted,some idiot hunter killed it. I mean he probably wasnīt about to starve to death, in Germany there are Restaurants,Stores and even McDonalds literally everywhere.

    greetings Znarf
    Sshhhhh...Don't mention that biathlon thing too loud. The State of Alaska may want to initiate a mtb/bear biathlon to control bear populations. They are always thinking of new ways of thinning out the populations without actually offering a bounty on bears.

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