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Thread: Mojo vs. Nomad

  1. #1
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    New question here. Mojo vs. Nomad

    If you already have a XC racing steel hardtail bike and a DH racing bike then which AM f/s trail frame would you get to build up, assuming that you have a Fox 36 fork and a Fox DHX 5 shock to install?

    My short list is: Mojo SL vs. Nomad...
    Last edited by TrailNut; 02-28-2009 at 02:22 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Obviously the nomad leans more towards the free ride/downhill side of mountain biking and the mojo goes more towards the xc side than the nomad. Haven ridden both and especially various builds of the mojo I'd say go for the mojo. The reason, it's the more versatile bike in the AM sector. It can be built to cover the more big hitting side of the AM category far better and easier than a nomad can get towards the xc side.

    Look how Lopes has used it, but also think about the fact that it really is a competitve xc platform as well. The same can't be said for the nomad. It's a great bike, no question. I just think that the Mojo is the most versatile bike available right now hands down. And for the record I don't own one (want one though), so my opinion is just based on riding both and thinking which bike made me want to go in to a lot of debt more :-)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by russya
    Obviously the nomad leans more towards the free ride/downhill side of mountain biking and the mojo goes more towards the xc side than the nomad. Haven ridden both and especially various builds of the mojo I'd say go for the mojo. The reason, it's the more versatile bike in the AM sector. It can be built to cover the more big hitting side of the AM category far better and easier than a nomad can get towards the xc side.

    Look how Lopes has used it, but also think about the fact that it really is a competitve xc platform as well. The same can't be said for the nomad. It's a great bike, no question. I just think that the Mojo is the most versatile bike available right now hands down. And for the record I don't own one (want one though), so my opinion is just based on riding both and thinking which bike made me want to go in to a lot of debt more :-)
    hmm, thanks. with a Mojo SL build to "race" SuperD and XC events, I can then convert my HT to be a winter/mud single-speed...

    My ideal of "racing" is that I pay a fair fee to ride as fast as I want, in harmony with everyone on that trail (no distractions to get in the way, know what I mean)
    The state that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards & its fighting by fools.

  4. #4
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    Exactly what I've thought of doing(s.s. and a versatile mojo). I was thinking of getting one with a lopes link and then having a coil and a rp23 for the rear to swap depending on use and maybe a two forks as well. Check the different builds on the ibis forum and you'll see they are all over the place from low 20 pound weight weenie bike up to bikes in the 30's that seem as burly as a nomad.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by russya
    Exactly what I've thought of doing(s.s. and a versatile mojo). I was thinking of getting one with a lopes link and then having a coil and a rp23 for the rear to swap depending on use and maybe a two forks as well. Check the different builds on the ibis forum and you'll see they are all over the place from low 20 pound weight weenie bike up to bikes in the 30's that seem as burly as a nomad.
    I would be willing to bet a beer that once you have the coil rear shock and a great 160mm fork on your mojo any consideration of switching back to "light mode" only passes your mind on those occasions that you are feeling guilty that you have an RP23 sitting gathering dust on a shelf somewhere.

    I still have a RP23 and a fully rebuilt Pace Fighter RC41 fork that haven't been on my mojo in well over 12 months that I really should just sell. (My mojo is 31lbs)

  6. #6
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    I think you're right or the most part but I do race some xc from time to time so I'd switch it for that. But not much else. Actually sean here could give the OP more insight than I can into the AM capabilities of the mojo since he's had his setup that way for awhile.

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