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  1. #1
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    Knowing Your Skill Level?

    How does one gauge their skill level on their mtb?

    Is their set criteria i.e huckin 5 feet in the air and you're advanced...

    Reason I'm asking there's some trails (viewed online) I'd like to visit for a ride - they are labelled = for Intermediate (what does this mean too?) to advanced...

    I'd hate to go up all amped for a ride and then find that I've just gone on a 40 min round trip...

    How does one know where they sit ^^

    If I were to be honest I'd guess I was somewhere in the intermediate range... but where?

    I'm assuming they (levels/ratings) are different for each discipline style too...

    T.I.A
    to err is human... to face plant is frickin hilarious!!

  2. #2
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    Yup... wasn't too revealing...

    from what I saw - I think I could manage...

    doesn't mean I'm int/advanced though...
    to err is human... to face plant is frickin hilarious!!

  3. #3
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    did you check YouTube to see if anyone put up vids of the place
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  4. #4
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    what kind of trails do you normally ride. what bike do you ride. can you bunny hop, ride a wheelie

    how long have you been riding
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  5. #5
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    Just found this

    Mountain bike track grading system: Mountain biking

    Doesn't tell me how good/bad a rider I am though...

    Maybe cleaning them is what it takes!? 0_o
    to err is human... to face plant is frickin hilarious!!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    what kind of trails do you normally ride. what bike do you ride. can you bunny hop, ride a wheelie

    how long have you been riding
    Bike: Kona Process 134

    Preferred Trails: Anything from Gnarly (what I'd call gnarly) single track to flat gravel roads (I prefer technical stuff) and like going fast downhill!

    Time: Been riding mtb's for 11 - 12 months

    Tricks: I'll huck around bike height but nothing over (yet) not much around these parts that exceeds anyhow...
    to err is human... to face plant is frickin hilarious!!

  7. #7
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    i wouldnt worry then. obviously if you seem something insane, go around it
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  8. #8
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    Knowing Your Skill Level?

    In my area Strava is a pretty scent way to gauge oneself with hundreds of riders using the app. But, I'd say that if you are comfortable enough to jump and it do 3ft drops then you can handle most advanced trails. (IMHO) You might not be the fastest but I bet you can clear most of it.

  9. #9
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    Re: Knowing Your Skill Level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ufdah View Post
    In my area Strava is a pretty scent way to gauge oneself with hundreds of riders using the app. But, I'd say that if you are comfortable enough to jump and it do 3ft drops then you can handle most advanced trails. (IMHO) You might not be the fastest but I bet you can clear most of it.
    Jumps... yeah!

    Drop offs, not so much

    Gimme a 1.5ft - 2ft lip and I'll grab some air!

    3 feet of a ledge!?

    It'd take a couple of walk overs ^^
    to err is human... to face plant is frickin hilarious!!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Jumps... yeah!

    Drop offs, not so much

    Gimme a 1.5ft - 2ft lip and I'll grab some air!

    3 feet of a ledge!?

    It'd take a couple of walk overs ^^
    no big deal. just make sure you land on your rear tire first. watch this...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhabgvIIXik
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  11. #11
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  12. #12
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    I feel that skill level is a bit subjective depending on what type of riding you do.

    I would consider myself an intermediate DH/FR rider, but would consider myself a pretty novice XC rider.

    By intermediate DH/FR, I'm saying i'm pretty comfortable doing 5-8 foot drops, and 10-15 foot doubles, but I still can't manual for the life of me.

    By novice XC, I'm saying I am pretty comfortable doing 10 mile rides, but 20+ mile rides will kill me. I'm just not in great shape.


    So it really all depends. An expert XC trail may only have really novice DH/FR features, but it's still considered an expert because of the distance and the climbing involved.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Reason I'm asking there's some trails (viewed online) I'd like to visit for a ride - they are labelled = for Intermediate (what does this mean too?) to advanced...
    In addition to looking for videos of the trail, maybe try asking in the regional forum where you're thinking about going, see if you can get some local advice? Or just head out there. Unless it's got mandatory drops/gaps with no walkarounds or incredibly scary exposure, you can always scout and only ride features you feel comfortable on.

  14. #14
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    "intermediate" doesn't mean a thing in this context. There is noting even close to a consistent rating system for trials; the only way you're going to find out if you're up to riding a trail is to go there (if a 40 minute round trip wasted is that big a deal to you... I don't know what to say, you must lead a much busier life than I do).

    PROBABLY what will happen is there will be sections you can't ride the first time; that you'll have to walk. Probably it will not be the whole thing. I feel like if there aren't sections you don't clean every time, you aren't challenging yourself.

  15. #15
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    It really depends, as others have said, on where you ride and where your expertise lies. I know slopestyle riders that don't bat an eye at massive jumps, but they are scared to death on technical rock gardens. I consider myself technically proficient for the trails my area (Salt Lake City), as most trails in my area are not difficult or scary (other than a few full-on DH trails at the resorts like NCS).

    So I feel I'm a good all-around rider.

    Then I went up to Vancouver and Whistler.

    Holy crap. I am truly nothing. Their trails are on an entirely different scale. Especially the north shore of Vancouver. Much of Whistler wasn't too bad, but Mt Fromme? By far, the scariest riding I've ever done. Pucker Factor: 11+. Huge greasy roots, mandatory drops, rotting skinnies, all with wooden death skewers waiting below... Their easier intermediate trails are as hard as the advanced trails here in Utah. And when a trail says Expert, they really really mean it. I haven't ever been so intimidated on my bike. MThe North Shore was a truly humbling experience, and I was grateful to have made it out in one piece. But it was still incredibly fun. I haven't been forced past my limits that hard in years. I think that one experience has expanded my ability a lot, as well as changed my opinion of that things like 'intermediate' and 'advanced' mean. Those Canucks are absolute beasts.
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  16. #16
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    nothing to add as far as how to guage skill level (all I know is that i'm still a rookie)

    but, um..

    no big deal. just make sure you land on your rear tire first. watch this...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhabgvIIXik
    that video is bonkers

  17. #17
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    I like the idea of YouTube vids on the trails you want to ride. That is how I check out a lot of trail. And as long as you don't go too fast around blind corners you can always stop and walk. What are the ratings on the local trails you normally ride? That should be a bit of an indication. I ride a lot of single black diamonds around here and I would never consider myself even close to an expert. Me, I am never too proud to hike a bike. Slim
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    no big deal. just make sure you land on your rear tire first. watch this...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhabgvIIXik
    Cool! I am almost there--my son has hit me in the head with a tennis ball while riding, just like in that video and I didn't fall off.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    It really depends, as others have said, on where you ride and where your expertise lies. I know slopestyle riders that don't bat an eye at massive jumps, but they are scared to death on technical rock gardens. I consider myself technically proficient for the trails my area (Salt Lake City), as most trails in my area are not difficult or scary (other than a few full-on DH trails at the resorts like NCS).

    So I feel I'm a good all-around rider.

    Then I went up to Vancouver and Whistler.

    Holy crap. I am truly nothing. Their trails are on an entirely different scale. Especially the north shore of Vancouver. Much of Whistler wasn't too bad, but Mt Fromme? By far, the scariest riding I've ever done. Pucker Factor: 11+. Huge greasy roots, mandatory drops, rotting skinnies, all with wooden death skewers waiting below... Their easier intermediate trails are as hard as the advanced trails here in Utah. And when a trail says Expert, they really really mean it. I haven't ever been so intimidated on my bike. MThe North Shore was a truly humbling experience, and I was grateful to have made it out in one piece. But it was still incredibly fun. I haven't been forced past my limits that hard in years. I think that one experience has expanded my ability a lot, as well as changed my opinion of that things like 'intermediate' and 'advanced' mean. Those Canucks are absolute beasts.
    What trails did you ride on Fromme?

  20. #20
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    Everytime I watch some of their edits/videos and see constant terrain and riding that is few and far between here- that sinking feeling of inadequacy sets in. Their tradition of gnar has really bred some awesome riders and trails. I'd like to do a proper visit when I'm riding well...

    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    Holy crap. I am truly nothing. Their trails are on an entirely different scale. Especially the north shore of Vancouver. ... Pucker Factor: 11+. .... And when a trail says Expert, they really really mean it. ... Those Canucks are absolute beasts.

  21. #21
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    just go ride, afterall thats what the experience is about. If it's too easy then seek another trail out, if to difficult find the happy medium place.

  22. #22
    perpetual pucker factor
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbvan View Post
    What trails did you ride on Fromme?
    First run was on Bobsled to get to know the dirt. Most spicy one was Ladies Only to Skull, then a stroll down BP back to the fire road. Also did another variation with Big Stupid.
    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
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