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  1. #1
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    Im a beginner. Don't have much experience. Need some help deciding.

    Basically where i live we don't have any trails fabricated specially for bikes . I usually ride some dirt roads , forest paths , river sides, also some couple of abandoned quarries. So i need a cheap bike that can take a beating and be decent at everything i trow at it. I don't care whether its a full susp or a hardtail (but i lean towards the second since is gonna be cheaper probably). New or old doesn't matter to me too. Weight is a bit of a concern, but if its not too heavy i don't care. Right now i ride a specialized p2 street, the cheap suntour fork sucks. Idk if its worth upgrading cause it just feels like a XC bike with wide handle bars and a short stem.

  2. #2
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    Im a beginner. Don't have much experience. Need some help deciding.

    There's a lot of unknowns that will help get you better responses:

    Budget?
    Type of riding? I.e. Are you looking to be fast in your riding or more into adventuring/casual lower speed stuff. Are you riding long distances?

    My 2 cents, I'd get a hardtail for sure, probably used so you can get more for your $$. If you don't have designated singletrack by you then you most likely don't need full sus. I'd consider a 27+ bike (demo one if you can). The extra cushion would be nice for riding quarries and such, but would be fine for paved/gravel if you don't care as much about being super fast. I actually love/prefer my fatbike for most riding. I often take it out to gravel pits or wilderness areas and it works great for adventuring untamed terrain. At the same time I'll commute 10 miles to work on paved trails without a care (it's certainly not fast or as efficient as a gravel bike but I don't care about speed on paved trails). If you don't need the cushion of a mtb tire you might consider a more cross/touring type bike like a Jamis renegade or similar. This would be much better on paved and still has the grit to wander off-road.

  3. #3
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    Yeahh, i'm more of an adventuring type although i try to go fast where i can, but i really never time anything just ride for fun. Sometimes i ride for long distances but usually not too long, like a ride through a forest with my friends and stay the night by the camp fire. Anyways thanks for the heads up!!! Its pretty amazing how much support you can get from folks on the internet . But what do you think about the bike i have now, is it any upgrade worthy?

  4. #4
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    Im a beginner. Don't have much experience. Need some help deciding.

    Quote Originally Posted by dimaiar View Post
    Yeahh, i'm more of an adventuring type although i try to go fast where i can, but i really never time anything just ride for fun. Sometimes i ride for long distances but usually not too long, like a ride through a forest with my friends and stay the night by the camp fire. Anyways thanks for the heads up!!! Its pretty amazing how much support you can get from folks on the internet . But what do you think about the bike i have now, is it any upgrade worthy?
    The P2 is more of a dirt jumper so it's geometry will not lend itself as well to the type of riding you seem to do. You can absolutely use it as is but I would not spend money on upgrades to make it more adventure friendly. That money would be much better put towards a different bike with a more "XC/trail" geometry which will be much more comfortable/capable and likely faster as a result. Seems like a plus bike (say something similar to a specialized fuse) would be a good option for an all arounder, I'd check out the 26+,27+,29+ thread for ideas and reviews, maybe the Bikepacking thread too if you're into loading up and camping via bike (part of the reason I love my fat bike, works great for Bikepacking). There's quite a few budget conscious plus bikes out there (fat bikes too), so see if your local bike shop will let you demo one and see if you like it. If your really on a budget and only plan on keeping one bike, you could probably sell the P2 and pretty much fund a used 29er hardtail which would also be a find choice.

  5. #5
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    That's what i thought. Gonna sell this bike then. But probably need to wait till summer to even try selling it. A plus side bike would be amazing, sadly i don't thinks i will find around here. Cycling is not really a think here. Most of the bikes sold are Hybrids or XC bikes. Thanks for help anyways!!! Gonna try figuring out what can i do.

  6. #6
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    Off the top of my head? Sounds like maybe you'd dig a Canondale Cujo. 120mm fork with 27.5+ tires. The high end of the line is $1500, but the low end has a coil fork. There's an intermediate option that might work for you.

  7. #7
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    Naw, sadly i don't have 1500$ laying around. Max for me would be like 400$. I mean i live in a country where the average paycheck is like 200-250$ and i'm a student living with my parents, so i don't have a full time job. The best plan for me i think is getting a bike with a decent frame and all the other parts cheap and crappy
    so i can upgrade them over time with better ones.

  8. #8
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    Due to where you live, sounds like you are limited to what is available around you and it will be a very limited selection. Post up some bikes you find and folks here gave give you there opinion. There probably isn't a great market for decent used bikes there; do you know of a website or something with listings? Where did you get your current bike?
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  9. #9
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    Yeah sure. Like most people get their bikes from a couple of guys who bring them over from Germany, France, sometimes US but usually from Europe. This is why they are overpriced since they need to pay for delivery and for the documents on the toll. And also the people who deliver don't really like delivering bikes since they take up a lot of unnecessary space. For example a bike takes as much space as two washing machines and will be a lot less profitable since only a limited amount of people would actually consider buying it, unlike with the washing machines. Some guys actually buy part lots and when they have enough parts they assemble bikes. You can also order a bike but it will be quiet expensive. Good parts also need to be ordered. The only way to get a good deal on a decent bike is to buy a stolen bike, but i don't want to do that.
    I can sent you the websites but they are ether in russian or romanian so idk if it would be any use.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimaiar View Post
    Yeah sure. Like most people get their bikes from a couple of guys who bring them over from Germany, France, sometimes US but usually from Europe. This is why they are overpriced since they need to pay for delivery and for the documents on the toll. And also the people who deliver don't really like delivering bikes since they take up a lot of unnecessary space. For example a bike takes as much space as two washing machines and will be a lot less profitable since only a limited amount of people would actually consider buying it, unlike with the washing machines. Some guys actually buy part lots and when they have enough parts they assemble bikes. You can also order a bike but it will be quiet expensive. Good parts also need to be ordered. The only way to get a good deal on a decent bike is to buy a stolen bike, but i don't want to do that.
    I can sent you the websites but they are ether in russian or romanian so idk if it would be any use.
    No, I can't read Russian or Romanian. If it is that difficult for you to find a decent bike, maybe you could purchase a better fork for your existing bike. Base on your riding, maybe just a rigid fork, wouldn't be too expensive. Why do you not like your existing fork?
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  11. #11
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    It just doesn't cut it barely works on mild stuff, but on the big stuff it feels like its running out of travel and doesn't have enough time to get into its starting position for the next obstacle. And when i ride hard it feels so flimsy like its about so snap or something. It Doesn't like jumps ether, i mean i can put a longer elastomer in it ti make it stiffer but its not going to make it any stronger. I did expected it to fare better.

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