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  1. #1
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    Ibis Mojo and GT Force comparison

    Basically i would like to hear comparisons of the two frames, most preferably from people who have ridden BOTH of these bikes. I would like to know how both of these compare in performance, performance such as pedaling, suspension design, climbing, descending, strength and etc.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Reviewer/Tester
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    The Ibis Mojo has won the MTBR Bike of the Year for two years running ... for good reason.

    Rainman.
    It is inevitable ...

  3. #3
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    I ride an I-Drive 5 and I prefer it to the DW Link. The DW is more plush but the I-Drive feels more efficient. My opinion.

  4. #4
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    I've ridden the Mojo and the GT Sanction (which is the same frame as the Force but with a beefier spec)- To compare them in a single sentence, I would say the following:
    The Mojo is the better XC mount, the GT a much better descender.

    Most people will tell you that the dw-Link Mojo is the vastly superior pedaling platform, and while it is more effective than 99% of the stuff on the market today, I really can't take anything away from the i-Drive. In fact I can say with confidence that it is the efficiency of the i-Drive that allowed me to build up such a beefy bike to be a daily rider.

    That said, many Forces can be built up to be far more trail-friendly which I suspect would put them right on par with the awesome all-day friendliness that the Mojo is known for.

    In all honesty I likely would have picked the Mojo on account of the trick carbon fiber construction (the green scheme is just stunning in person) but from a performance perspective, I feel like the GT offers very similar results for much less coin.

    Hope this helps- feel free to ask more specific questions.
    Ever been to Mountain Bike Tales Digital Magazine? Now if only the print rags would catch on!

  5. #5
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    The 26 pound GT Force should be a good comparison to the Mojo. If I could trade my I-Drive for a Mojo, I would. Not lying. A Mojo is a just an excellent bike. But for 2 pounds and 2000 dollars less, you could get a Force with an excellent and durable build.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimTwisted
    I've ridden the Mojo and the GT Sanction (which is the same frame as the Force but with a beefier spec)- To compare them in a single sentence, I would say the following:
    The Mojo is the better XC mount, the GT a much better descender.

    Most people will tell you that the dw-Link Mojo is the vastly superior pedaling platform, and while it is more effective than 99% of the stuff on the market today, I really can't take anything away from the i-Drive. In fact I can say with confidence that it is the efficiency of the i-Drive that allowed me to build up such a beefy bike to be a daily rider.
    Thanks, SlimTwisted. Can you describe in a bit more detail the characteristics of both suspensions? Like how is the small bump compliance on both of them like? How much is it affected by pedal bob? etc...

    That said, many Forces can be built up to be far more trail-friendly which I suspect would put them right on par with the awesome all-day friendliness that the Mojo is known for.
    Yeah good that you mention that, cause i particularly would like to know more of the 'potential' of the two frame, as i intend to put together the build myself with my own selection of parts rather than buy the whole bike.

    In all honesty I likely would have picked the Mojo on account of the trick carbon fiber construction (the green scheme is just stunning in person) but from a performance perspective, I feel like the GT offers very similar results for much less coin.
    The Force in fact, also comes in carbon fiber:

  7. #7
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    Peternguyen:

    Not a problem, happy to help. In fact it's funny you should ask these specifics because that was the exact two frames I had to choose from last year. Like yourself, I simply couldn't do too much research on the matter.

    First of all, I forgot that GT came out with a carbon Force frame, at the time of my investigating, aluminum was as good as it got. Had the fiber version existed at the time, my decision would have been even easier.

    As far as the characteristics of each, I guess the best way to describe the dw-Link on the Mojo would be to imagine a really plush 4-bar design that refuses to squat regardless of how hard you hammer the cranks. In fact it works in such a way that you could easily forget it's even there. I remember hammering along at a pretty good clip and glancing down at the shock- which was totally active there within its linkage. In other words there's no clatter, no bouncing sensation, no pedal bob or kick back. You simply spurt ahead with each rotation of the cranks and the dw-Link takes care of the worrying.

    The i-Drive is just as effective (in my opinion) but feels different. Since the cranks are essentially connected on the rear triangle, pedaling on the GT feels almost more direct. Its rather hard to describe exactly but think of it where the bike almost feels disconnected. The main frame, steering, and seat are quite isolated from the activity of the rear end/ pedaling forces.

    Where the i-Drive really delivered was in the climbing department. I attribute this to the fact that the suspension is completely unaffected by whether the rider stays seated or stands up. I'm an admitted pedal masher when it comes to climbing and its here that I couldn't find the limitations of the i-Drive.

    Like I was saying before, I imagine my Sanction is up there in weight, not sure but I must be in the high 30 lbs range but the linkage has allowed me to hang on the xc trails. My only upgrade at this point will be a third chainring for even more versatility.

    I can only imagine what a light build/ CF Force frame could achieve.

    As far as small bump compliance, you might find a slight advanatage with the Mojo. Like I said, you don't even realize how much terrain the shock is gobbling up as your moving along until you actually see the shock silently doing its thing. Of course my Sanction is set up a bit on the stiff side for drops and rocks, but I suppose fine tuning the Fox DHX could make it much more compliant for singletrack use.

    Bottom line: Its close! What kind of riding do you intend to use the bike for mostly?
    Ever been to Mountain Bike Tales Digital Magazine? Now if only the print rags would catch on!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimTwisted
    Bottom line: Its close! What kind of riding do you intend to use the bike for mostly?
    Thanks again! Well i'd like to have a bike for trail to all mountain use. Currently where i ride, the style is mostly trail, although i like to have a frame capable of all mountain, and to be as tough as an all mountain bike as i move on to rougher trails.

  9. #9
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    I've ridden both, far more on my Mojo, just a demo ride on the Force. The Force is very impressive in today's options for this XC-Enduro/AM travel category. The frame geometry is virtually the same, 69/73 with low BBs, the Force has 1/2 inch more rear travel so properly sagged slacks the angles slightly more than the Mojo, but the Mojo feels just as plush with a little easier/smoother mid travel sharp bump compliance while coasting and greater compliance difference when pedaling. The Force is extremely stiff and stout feeling, but that comes with more frame weight. The Mojo is not as stiff, but stiffer than most for this travel, and feels more precise handling, more nimble. The Mojo has much better braking traction and better rough trail acceleration compliance without any additional mushy feel, but the Force is very good in both areas too, with both about equal in seated or standing pedal bob and no noticeable pedal feedback. Looks are subjective of course, in my opinion the Mojo is art on wheels and still after 3 years of production gets many complements on the trail from expert riders.

  10. #10
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    I was secretly hoping Derby would have chimed in
    Of anyone's opinion here on MTBR, his is certainly one worth taking seriously.

    I think he mentioned something in his post that I was trying to say myself (but couldn't spit it out). Somehow the Mojo feels plusher (without ever giving a hint of mushy pedaling/ or bobbing suspension) while the GT simply feels more rigid overall (but again- not harsh either). Of course my knowledge is limited to the aluminum version, perhaps someone else can post to shed some light on whether this trait transferred to the carbon frame.


    Ever been to Mountain Bike Tales Digital Magazine? Now if only the print rags would catch on!

  11. #11
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    Thanks derby, nice comparison. I would love to be able to test ride these two bikes, even if its just in the car park but unfortunately i can't find any shop that have these bikes in store - they'll only order it if i plan to buy it. I'd love to hear some more comparisons.

  12. #12
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    choosing between the two is a nice problem to have.

    I went for a Mojo but both bikes were excellent

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzl62
    choosing between the two is a nice problem to have.

    I went for a Mojo but both bikes were excellent
    Dont forget the ease and expense of service.

    Not sure how the Ibis bearings are installed, how expensive they are or how hard they are to get BUT I do know that the GT requires only a simple Shimano BB tool to access the bearings and GT made it easy on the world by using simple sealed ahead type 1 1/8" headset bearings. Go to ANY LBS and score some bearings for your GT or call Ibis and wait. I am not saying that Ibis is slow in their CS, in fact I would say they have a solid customer service reputation but it doesnt get any easier with a GT, especially if you live half way around the world from California

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    I've ridden both, far more on my Mojo, just a demo ride on the Force. The Force is very impressive in today's options for this XC-Enduro/AM travel category. The frame geometry is virtually the same, 69/73 with low BBs, the Force has 1/2 inch more rear travel so properly sagged slacks the angles slightly more than the Mojo, but the Mojo feels just as plush with a little easier/smoother mid travel sharp bump compliance while coasting and greater compliance difference when pedaling. The Force is extremely stiff and stout feeling, but that comes with more frame weight. The Mojo is not as stiff, but stiffer than most for this travel, and feels more precise handling, more nimble. The Mojo has much better braking traction and better rough trail acceleration compliance without any additional mushy feel, but the Force is very good in both areas too, with both about equal in seated or standing pedal bob and no noticeable pedal feedback. Looks are subjective of course, in my opinion the Mojo is art on wheels and still after 3 years of production gets many complements on the trail from expert riders.
    What about the LopesLink bandaid? how much additional cost is it and will it improve stiffness to be compairable to the GT?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimTwisted
    I was secretly hoping Derby would have chimed in
    Of anyone's opinion here on MTBR, his is certainly one worth taking seriously.

    I think he mentioned something in his post that I was trying to say myself (but couldn't spit it out). Somehow the Mojo feels plusher (without ever giving a hint of mushy pedaling/ or bobbing suspension) while the GT simply feels more rigid overall (but again- not harsh either). Of course my knowledge is limited to the aluminum version, perhaps someone else can post to shed some light on whether this trait transferred to the carbon frame.
    I'm a perpetual student about these things, especially since trail bikes have evolved so much in the last 5 years.

    The GT Sanction should be somewhat similar to the Force but they are not the same in geometry, although both share the same 6 inch rear travel suspension geometry.

    According to the GT web site the Sanction with a 66 degree head angle is 1.75 (almost 2 degrees) degrees slacker head angle using the same 160/36mm fork than the Force or Mojo. I think the Sanction is more AM/FR oriented than the Mojo's or Force's Enduro/AM geometry.

    I agree with SlimT that the rear suspension of the Force (and I would guess the same with the Sanction's identical suspension) feels a little firmer than the Mojo's mid-travel compliance over smaller to medium sharp rock hits. The Mojo just fly's with little resistance thought chunky rocky trail, whether pedaling or not. The Force just doesn't feel quite as mid-travel compliant, even though both have nearly no pedal bob while seated or accelerating hard while standing.

    The GT Force is a very impressive ride in today's bike line up for an XC/Enduro/AM versatile use bike. In my opinion, for versatility and high end refinement, the Mojo continues to lead the 5 - 6 inch travel XC-Enduro/AM niche. But the alternatives to the Mojo are getting much closer to equally satisfying my interests, and for some riders other bikes including the Force could be better suited for their trail bike ride style or social pier group.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmerjohn
    What about the LopesLink bandaid? how much additional cost is it and will it improve stiffness to be compairable to the GT?
    The Lopes Link is minor enhancement for the '09 Mojo which retro fits to earlier year models. It's $75 and very easy to replace the original links.

    The Force is one of the stiffest bikes available, very few suspension bikes compare. The Mojo is now nearly as stiff with the Lopes Link, stiffer than most well known bikes with this travel.

    I've found that wheel and fork stiffness are equally if not greater factors to overall handling stiffness differences.

  17. #17
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    When you do your comparison, I would compare an Ibis and a Force of equal cost. I'm willing to bet money that the Ibis would be just as heavy as the Force.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    I agree with SlimT that the rear suspension of the Force (and I would guess the same with the Sanction's identical suspension) feels a little firmer than the Mojo's mid-travel compliance over smaller to medium sharp rock hits. The Mojo just fly's with little resistance thought chunky rocky trail, whether pedaling or not. The Force just doesn't feel quite as mid-travel compliant, even though both have nearly no pedal bob while seated or accelerating hard while standing.
    Ah i see. Could you please describe to what degree the Force is less compliant? Not being able to ride either bikes, i'd just like to get a good idea via user experience. Like is there a considerable difference? How did you find the Forces small bump compliance to the Mojo? Also, are you basing your description on what you know to be related to the rear suspension design, or just what you experienced (as in maybe a different shock or configuration may improve the Force).

    Sorry for trying to dig out some info in more detail, might be annoying to keep asking, but if i could test ride a Mojo, i so would. Not being able to, this is all i can do. Thanks.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by airs0ft3r
    When you do your comparison, I would compare an Ibis and a Force of equal cost. I'm willing to bet money that the Ibis would be just as heavy as the Force.
    I dont know what the mojo or the GT Force Carbon weigh but as long as we are compairing apples to apples. Its hard to imagine that there would be a two pound difference between the two carbon frames. So, cost and weight... If the GT weighs more but costs less, just means you have alot more $$ to spend on premium components and the GT will still be stiffer than the spicy potato's

  20. #20
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    Does anyone know the weight and price of a carbon Force frame? My XL Mojo SL is 5.3lbs and sells for $2300.
    Remember when comparing the rides of these bikes that if you rode a pre '09 Mojo it was flexier and less compliant than the current bikes due to the lack of the Lopes Link and the medium compression tune shock ('09s have low compression tune). If you are getting a Mojo DEFINITELY get the Fox RPL shock. It's so nice to have the open, ProPedal, Lockout options.
    Lastly I have never ridden an I-Drive bike but did ride many URT bikes back in the day. Can you feel the effects of the pedals being somewhat connected to the swingarm? Does it stiffen when standing? I'd have to imagine that the Mojo with low tune shock is much plusher over small chop than an I-Drive bike.
    Last edited by Lelandjt; 02-27-2009 at 12:46 AM.
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  21. #21
    half tread will travel
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    hey guys, an 09 ibis mojo classic frame, shimano slx build, mavis wheels and a rock shox revelation 140mm fork retails for 2999 dollars...try to compare that for performance verses dollars...good luck...
    tread lightly...earth is our playground

  22. #22
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    The force 1.0 retails for 3k msrp with full xt, fox 32 and mavic 719's... keep in mind, this bike could be had through Performance for about 2500 most of the time. That's even tougher to beat.

  23. #23
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    Even better, Force Carbon (lower level) retails for 4300, so 3900 isn't a far figure at all. The higher level one is still under 6k.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by peternguyen
    Ah i see. Could you please describe to what degree the Force is less compliant? Not being able to ride either bikes, i'd just like to get a good idea via user experience. Like is there a considerable difference? How did you find the Forces small bump compliance to the Mojo? Also, are you basing your description on what you know to be related to the rear suspension design, or just what you experienced (as in maybe a different shock or configuration may improve the Force).

    Sorry for trying to dig out some info in more detail, might be annoying to keep asking, but if i could test ride a Mojo, i so would. Not being able to, this is all i can do. Thanks.
    Both the Force and Mojo are designed with the same air spring shock, both with the small can RP/Float. It feels like from the ride feel difference that the high monopivot shock leverage rate of the Force is probably less progressive, more linear, in mid travel than the multi-link tuned shock leveraged Mojo, giving the mid-travel bump compliance advantage to the Mojo. The DW-Link anti-squat effects also gives a balanced and stable bump compliance, without loosing acceleration efficiency, advantage to the Mojo while pedaling through rough, chunky terrain. For an advanced rider with much experience on many suspension designs, the DWL pedaling advantage over rough trail is very noticeable. Going from DWL to other designs feels sluggish or more awkward.

    The i-Drive (Independent Drivetrain) design of GT suspension is better than any monopivot or URT. I owned an early iDrive 4 inch travel bike bike back in 2002 for a short time as a backup for my 4 inch travel Horst link bike, an Intense Tracer, but always preferred the Tracer so never rode the GT after a few rides and sold it to a friend who still rides it occasionally. The new iDrive is much improved, particularly in improved swingarm stiffness and reduced bob when standing and pedaling.

  25. #25
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    I just wanted to second all of the nice things being said about the newer iDrive design. The biggest difference between the iDrive and other suspension designs is not the minimization of pedal bob due to my weight moving around, but the reduction of suspension compression due to pedaling forces through the drivetrain. I rode a Heckler on the street, and could feel the shock squishing just the tiniest bit the whole time there was load on it - it made it exhausting to ride. I have ridden the Force 3.0 on concrete, and it behaves better than anything else in terms of translating torque on the crank into forward motion - obviously, I mean better than other FS bikes. I haven't had a chance to get a Force into the dirt, but I'm saving my pennies so that by midsummer I should be able to order up a 1.0.

    I don't mean to sound 1 sided - the Mojo is obviously a great bike - but I haven't ridden one. I would, however, tend to suggest you stay with aluminum. I have a carbon hardtail, and while I love everything about the ride, I'm a little nervous about crashes. I ride mostly XC stuff (just moving towards AM - hence the bike research) so I don't do many big jumps or substantial drops, but I would feel weird taking a carbon frame off of a 5 or 6 foot drop.

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