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  1. #1
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    I rode Lapierre e:i shock all summer, verdict: HORROR

    Hi people,

    Somewhere around April this year I bought a fresh Lapierre 527 AM Zesty, e:i shock. I have been riding it like mad for the whole summer, and the results are in.

    I will go straight to the punch line: it's one of the worst designed and engineered products I have witnessed in the biking industry. If you have ever even considered buying e:i, do not. Avoid it like black plague. Go for the "normal" FS version. As I am typing this, Lapierre is sending me a regular replacement shock and my local bike shop will strip down all e:i components from the bike, and install the regular shock. The rest of the bike is amazing, one of the best bikes I rode, but the e:i shock is truly, utterly, and without any doubt, just pure plain horror.

    As an additional piece of information, before this bike I was riding Specialized Stumpjumper with Brain, for about 4 years, which is Spec's version of automated shock control.

    DESIGN

    By design, I of course mean, "how it works".

    In theory, looking at marketing of the e:i, this system is supposed to be intelligent beast which knows when to keep the bike's shock locked, and when to unlock it. That's the theory.

    Here is the marketing video on Vimeo:

    In reality, here's what happens. The e:i system will keep your shock unlocked by default, and will always default to fully unlocked. If you are not spinning, it will be unlocked. So this means that any cornering you do (because you stop spinning in the corners and weight the outside crank), will unlock the system.

    On the flip side, as soon as you start spinning the e:i will lock the shock. So this means that even if you are going downhill and you start spinning a little bit, the shock will lock. Yes, it will lock while you are going downhill and while the bike is taking a beating.

    There is no cleverness and "intelligence" in the system. It's a simple binary thing – if you are spinning it is locked, if you are not spinning, it is unlocked. That's it. No matter how much this can screw you, it's like that.

    By the way, now that I have seen that advertising video again, I can honestly say it's showing false advertising. In that animation the cranks of the bike are spinning (at 1:40) yet the shock unlocks. This does not happen in reality. In reality, in that exact situation, since it shows cranks spinning you would hit that obstacle with locked shock.

    ENGINEERING

    The servo controlling the shock is horrible and you can witness this in the YouTube videos I made, linked below. And before you say "well, you have a faulty servo" please note that both my bike shop said this is normal, and that this video of servicing e:i shock clearly has audible BZZZZZ. Go to 1:30 of this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_rgXn9jYlE&t=90

    The video is in German, but you will hear the buzz, that part is pretty universal for all languages. And seeing that the engineer repairing the thing does not even twitch on this sound, means something is dodgy with the whole thing.

    Besides servo, the whole battery compartment is bad. In these few months of riding e:i I had to replace the battery because either due to water coming through the contacts, or some other mechanical/chemical issue, the battery could no longer hold charge for more than 20 minutes of riding. So I would fully charge it, ride out, and after about 20 minutes the battery would die, rendering the whole system dead (the shock is stuck in the last setting, of course). There is no easy manual override as well. There is SOME override, but not easy.

    So even engineering-wise, and construction-wise, the whole thing is horrible. Poor mechanical components, plasticky bits, unreliable battery, etc.

    Furthermore, the way the head unit is mounted on the fork gives you a screwed up fork. This looks like it is a regular spacer (see pic below), but it is not.

    I rode Lapierre e:i shock all summer, verdict: HORROR-test-e-i-auto-600x350.jpg

    What this is is an extension above fork, and is held in place by the top part of the stem. Yes, that is right, part of the stem (say 3/4) is grabbing the fork tube, and the top 1/4 of the stem is grabbing the head unit, and then on top comes the cap. Now, I know all of these parts are over-engineered, and bike is probably safe to ride. But if we put that aside, you simply get a short fork tube. e:i unit is not a spacer. You cannot for example move the e:i unit below the stem, and get your stem a little bit up, and this is something people are actually doing depending on what kind of trail they ride. You cannot do that with e:i bike. You get a short fork, deal with it. e:i is not a spacer, it's its own thing.

    If you don't get what I am saying, I could disassemble my head block and take a photo as an example.

    Probably because of that even the man who is the main designer of the whole system Nico Vouilloz, has the thing ripped out and basically broken and velcroed onto the bike, like this:

    Pro bike: Nico Vouilloz's Lapierre Spicy Team - BikeRadar

    I rode Lapierre e:i shock all summer, verdict: HORROR-1446143330715-1getjt1sth3ms-630-80.jpg

    What better illustrates the moronic engineering of this than the dude himself ripping it apart and mounting it differently.

    VIDEOS

    Here are video reviews I made while up in my favourite Irish mountains, they are broken down for easier viewing & by some sort of a theme:

    1: Introduction to the whole thing
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtG339NI_JE

    2: System overview
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7cokdgfzjw

    3: The buzzing sound introduction
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCd5NS3IKPU

    4: The horror of buzz
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYYnSaxy4Hc

    5: Manually setting it to a certain mode (locked)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-h_mWpn2lD0

    6: Nope, the buzzing is still there
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-orstP0BoI

    7: Showcase of the automated e:i system, and the stupidity of it
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0I5ijhN97Q


    –––––––––––––––––––––

    By the way, I do believe this is first full true review of Lapierre's e:i system, all others I could Google are either marketing fillers, or people asking is e:i good. I could not find any other honest, a little bit in-depth reviews of it. Hopefully, I will save some people the pain I had to go though. If you are buying Lapierre, just buy regular FS, skip the e:i horror.

  2. #2
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    Interesting. I think we are still a little ways off from effective "active" damping like many cars have.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  3. #3
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    That bike was over-engineered, maybe because when Shimano came out with Di2, they thought automation was the future. But when the fanfare noise is down to a whimper, its just a godamm bike. Whats next airbags so you won't hit the ground?
    Ride More, Eat More

  4. #4
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    I will say this.

    You are teh King of making and posting a thread on MTBR...

    and making videos describing a series of issues.

    Short, exactly to the point, understandable. Three thumbs up

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Interesting. I think we are still a little ways off from effective "active" damping like many cars have.
    a few things

    to make it electronic active like some race car engineering has done, it will need lidar or radar to sense the terrain >before the bike arrives<

    and

    bikes turn and steer extremely quickly and deal with much smaller obstacles and terrain. you decide to thread your way through the chunder making changes.

    No race car suspension electronics ever had to deal with such minute changes and tennis-ball sized things you can easily just steer away from.


    electronics can easily keep up with the speed of any changes the bike or human can deliver, but translating that into actual control of bike-sized shocks at the required speed, and be able to sense trail imperfections which are much tinier than a car or rally car would deal with... I don't know if it is possible to do it without adding 10 lbs of systems to the bike.

    you'd need lidar and radar directly in front of each wheel where it is about to hit something, and extremely fast action at the shock. that servo thing in the vids
    sounds slow because it is slow

    what we have today which is manual levers and internal valving is still far superior to what LaPierre is attempting to do at this time

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post


    electronics can easily keep up with the speed of any changes the bike or human can deliver, but translating that into actual control of bike-sized shocks at the required speed, and be able to sense trail imperfections which are much tinier than a car or rally car would deal with... I don't know if it is possible to do it without adding 10 lbs of systems to the bike.
    The way I see it, any delay in absorbing a bump, no matter how small, is time that the suspension is not working and it will be transmitting that initial shock to the rider, which is what you don't want. This is why the previous electronic systems, specialized brain systems, inertia valves, and other attempts at this have worked so poorly. It has to ready to absorb before the bump, not adjust after it's started. The technology will eventually come, for sure, but we just aren't anywhere near it right now.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The way I see it, any delay in absorbing a bump, no matter how small, is time that the suspension is not working and it will be transmitting that initial shock to the rider, which is what you don't want. This is why the previous electronic systems, specialized brain systems, inertia valves, and other attempts at this have worked so poorly. It has to ready to absorb before the bump, not adjust after it's started. The technology will eventually come, for sure, but we just aren't anywhere near it right now.
    This is always what I thought about the inertia valves. The technology came from racing trucks as I recall. Seems like a little extra initial bump in those suspensions, especially considering the tire size and terrain would be less important than on a bike where you feel every little ripple. There have been so many ways to skin this cat, from the e-shocks from Proflex, the magnetorhelogic fluids in some early forks, to the 5th element low speed compression circuits and the inertia and spul valves from Fox and White Bros. Frankly I feel like so many of these things are bandaids to patch either poorly performing suspension designs or patch people's expectations of how suspension should work.

    Suspension should be active, that is how it works best. Some movement while climbing isn't killing you and having your suspension always on is a great thing especially when you happen across a branch on a trail or when a rock kicks up from the person in front of you. Ask anyone that has accidentally not activated their suspension on a descent.

    People have to stop buying gimmicks. Gimmicks sell more bikes but they don't help push the design and evolution of bikes that actually work well. This well written and documented review is a great case in point.

    Thanks for the review OP!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    Suspension should be active, that is how it works best. Some movement while climbing isn't killing you and having your suspension always on is a great thing especially when you happen across a branch on a trail or when a rock kicks up from the person in front of you. Ask anyone that has accidentally not activated their suspension on a descent.

    People have to stop buying gimmicks. Gimmicks sell more bikes but they don't help push the design and evolution of bikes that actually work well. This well written and documented review is a great case in point.

    Thanks for the review OP!
    ^^^This!!! Thank you for putting this in writing. I hope one day people will start to understand what they are buying, instead of just buying the latest and greatest with no idea of what it does or how it works.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the info!! I'm on the fence with a 2015 XR 529 with or without e Ei shock. Other than the shock, you like the bike? I think I really just need someone to tell me to buy it! I get a prodeal on them so it's hard to pass up. The only thing I'm not sure about is the reliability of it all. No shops here carry them.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotth72 View Post
    ^^^This!!! Thank you for putting this in writing. I hope one day people will start to understand what they are buying, instead of just buying the latest and greatest with no idea of what it does or how it works.
    Exactly.
    I'm very green to this world, but I see what in my opinion is an overpriced market, inflated especially by the customer?!?, which in many/most cases could easily be equally served, performance-wise, by a lower priced product which will lack some aesthetic detail, a knob, a screw, etc., but only want the newest, better, more powerful, with x or y innovation which sometimes (like the review in question) apparently is all bollocks...

  11. #11
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    I think a major problem with all self locking and platform shocks is that in many cases you don't want lockout, ever. Any self locking would be unwanted.

    Even on flat boring steep grind climbs, I've found staying open reduces fatigue. I hate charging up a flat boring climb and never do, but that seems to be the only time platform helps. I'd rather use that time to spin and save energy for any technical climbing, which also benefits from an open shock.

    Im not sure if it has a future in mountain biking. If your bike pedals well, harsh isn't going to help you.

  12. #12
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    They need to create a shock that adjusts to audible responses e.g. 'Woohoo!' 'Yeah!' 'Oh Shit!' and the shock opens fully...

    Grunting and heavy breathing and it's in climb mode...

    Everything else can be trail ^^

    Sent from my kltedv using Tapatalk
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  13. #13
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    Fully active, responds to everything, stupid simple, and light? Sounds like a URT.

    Want to add stiffness in a climb? Sounds like a single pivot swingarm.
    "Go soothingly in the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon"

  14. #14
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    I have a 427 and opted for the non electric squishy version..in the long run anything electrical breaks down..overall fun bike.

  15. #15
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    Sounds like something is defective or they made a lot of changes since 2014/2015. The system should not just locked based on pedaling and should be looking at speed and amount of bumps. Example if I'm flying down a rocky trail and pedal the system won't lock. On a flatter but rocky section pedaling may go into medium mode. Even pedaling uphill if the trail is rocky it doesn't lock. Also if I set mine to a certain mode the servo motor does not continue to change.

    Now I agree with the reliability concerns I've had mine for almost 3 years now but the shock has been back 2 different times and this is the second E:i system the first being the older 2014 version. The battery no longer works for more than the first 20-30mins of a ride and even in locked its not doing what it's suppose to. To me the system was pretty good when it works right but I can't keep dealing with the issues so I'm looking to get rid of it.

    Anyone know if you can just that the E:I servo off and install a manually switch in it's place?

  16. #16
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    For some unknown reason my bull-crap detector didn't trigger, and I did not consider this to be a gimmick. I genuinely thought this was a good system.

    But after riding it, yeah, it's a bad bad bad gimmick (as you have seen in my original post).

    Last week I got the whole thing removed, and the shock is replaced with regular Monarch RT3.

    To answer some of your questions:

    - the rest of the bike is great, everything is just awesome. Although, I did replace some of things immediately (I removed fancy seat post, and installed regular one, put X0 mech)

    - the EI shock cannot be simply "downgraded" (lol, in the light of things, it's an upgrade actually) to be regular one. You need a new one. The servo motor is bolted onto the head of it and there's a prong inside of it that goes into the shock. Long story short, it's a fully custom shock, not just a "cap" of sorts being added to the regular shock.

    - the thing is NOT defective. After I complained, mechanics at LBS looked at it, and tested, and came to conclusion that it works fine.

    - you can use the whole system as MANUAL switch, you don't have to use it in auto. Manual simply cycles between unlocked-medium-locked, but then the question is, what's the purpose of it if you have to do everything manually, you might as well just use regular shock. At least regular shock is lighter and does not have battery and all other electronic nonsense.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan4jeepin View Post
    Sounds like something is defective or they made a lot of changes since 2014/2015.
    I demoed one of these in 2014 and his assessment matches mine; i thought it was hilariously bad. The defining moment was taking a pedal stroke going in to a double and taking off with the suspension locked- wheee that was not the trajectory i expected! Then the battery died and the bike was actually better in every respect; it's a good bike crippled by a ridiculous electronic system.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    taking a pedal stroke going in to a double and taking off with the suspension locked
    Exactly. The bike will actually do its best to totally screw you over.

    The main problem, looking from the design standpoint, is that they had envisioned one perfect "golden thread" scenario for this bike to be used. Something like - you pedal constantly when going up the smooth hill (so no obstacles on the way going up, or anything strange happening), and then on your descent you do not ever need to push a pedal, ever never. The only time you push pedals on descent is for some longer periods of time (above 10 seconds) when it's not just straight descent but you have to push through some choppy terrain.

    Then it works perfectly.

    In literally any other scenario the E:I system will be actively detrimental to your ride.

  19. #19
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    To each their own

    I've got the 2015 XR729, and my buddy has the zesty 529 (recently coming off a spicy 527). I ride much more than my friend these days, but purchased my XR729 2 years ago. I absolutely love the ei setup. I have not ever encountered a problem with mine. My buddy had a servo gear strip, but SRAM replaced it for him. That's just what you get with servo's sometimes. Yess, the servo makes a buzz noise, but it's supposed to, it has a small electric motor in it. Some people supposedly have issues with the equipment stopping working after a wash, I am sure never to use high pressure water when I wash, and mine is still working great. The only problem I've got, is that I have broken the mount for the upper sensor, but a little bit of superglue and sugru has it strengthened and staying as it should. I love the fact that if I hit a bump with the front fork, that the rear shock will either open halfway, or fully for me. I like that it fully opens when I stop pedaling, and locks itself up when I start pedaling again. I don't ever have to think about locking/unlocking my suspension, and I even get the halfway open middle ground I don't feel I ever get with a manual lockout. Some may have had shitty experiences with theirs, but I don't think it's necessarily the technology that is the problem. In the IT field, we call it a pbcac error. Problem between the chair and the computer. Some just aren't suited to using the technology that they have.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdmbird83 View Post
    hProblem between the chair and the computer. Some just aren't suited to using the technology that they have.
    No, that's not the issue. As many others stated in the replies here, the main problem is that the EI system was designed with perfect trail in mind. A trail where you only pedal up the hill with constant cadence, and when you turn your bike down, it's constant down without the need to ever spin.

    Under such perfect conditions, EI works perfectly.

    Unfortunately the world simply isn't this perfect.

    EI system screwed me on numerous occasions both when going up and when going down.

    On the up part, every time I needed to pull up a step-like climb (over a rock or something), as soon as I stop pedalling the EI unlocks, meaning I get a full plush suspension for that climb. Effectively making the step-climb much harder as the shock absorbs the energy which was meant to be used to climb the step.

    And on the down part, whenever I wanted to pick up some speed in order to do a small jump, the bike locks, meaning I am hitting the ramp/jump with locked suspension. Sure, it might unlock mid-air because I am not pedalling in the air, but the very fact that I cannot preload the shock before the jump because it is locked is insane.

    The whole thing is useless in the real life scenarios. Maybe the trails around Lapierre where they ride when designing stuff are PERFECT, and it works there, but for me in Ireland, the setup is useless.

    The final nail in the coffin of EI is the fact that for 2018 no Lapierre have them. They ditched the whole system.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdmbird83 View Post
    I've got the 2015 XR729, and my buddy has the zesty 529 (recently coming off a spicy 527). I ride much more than my friend these days, but purchased my XR729 2 years ago. I absolutely love the ei setup. I have not ever encountered a problem with mine. My buddy had a servo gear strip, but SRAM replaced it for him. That's just what you get with servo's sometimes. Yess, the servo makes a buzz noise, but it's supposed to, it has a small electric motor in it. Some people supposedly have issues with the equipment stopping working after a wash, I am sure never to use high pressure water when I wash, and mine is still working great. The only problem I've got, is that I have broken the mount for the upper sensor, but a little bit of superglue and sugru has it strengthened and staying as it should. I love the fact that if I hit a bump with the front fork, that the rear shock will either open halfway, or fully for me. I like that it fully opens when I stop pedaling, and locks itself up when I start pedaling again. I don't ever have to think about locking/unlocking my suspension, and I even get the halfway open middle ground I don't feel I ever get with a manual lockout. Some may have had shitty experiences with theirs, but I don't think it's necessarily the technology that is the problem. In the IT field, we call it a pbcac error. Problem between the chair and the computer. Some just aren't suited to using the technology that they have.
    If having to adapt to constantly changing bike handling isn't screwing you up that speaks to inexperience. It indicates improving fitness and skill will make a much bigger difference than adaptive suspension can. The adaptive suspension is actively working against someone who appreciates this stuff. This is a common problem with mtb... really any similar sport- innovations that help mediocre participants maximize their mediocrity at the expense of progression. Even if you like this garbage you're better off disabling it, especially on these lapierre bikes that are quite good when the garbage is turned off.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  22. #22
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    It would be funny to build an all-gimmick bike, with the Lapierre EI, those magnet-pedals, vibrocore handlebar, those disc brakes that use water, etc...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  23. #23
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    ^^ Until you had to explain to your wife why you never ride your new bike...
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    This is a common problem with mtb... really any similar sport- innovations that help mediocre participants maximize their mediocrity at the expense of progression.
    Well, let's talk about this. With this attitude, we would still be riding rigid bikes with clamp brakes. But technological progress is good – when indeed it's good – and that's why we have awesome suspension, awesome hydraulic brakes, better geometry, better frames, better derailleurs, etc.

    Arguably, suspension alone helps mediocre bike riders plow through a bit more difficult terrain.

    So technology and progress itself is NOT the problem.

    What's the problem is garbage technology. That the EI system clearly is.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon View Post
    Well, let's talk about this. With this attitude, we would still be riding rigid bikes with clamp brakes. But technological progress is good – when indeed it's good – and that's why we have awesome suspension, awesome hydraulic brakes, better geometry, better frames, better derailleurs, etc.

    Arguably, suspension alone helps mediocre bike riders plow through a bit more difficult terrain.

    So technology and progress itself is NOT the problem.

    What's the problem is garbage technology. That the EI system clearly is.
    Both of you have good points. Desirable technology brings a percentage of performance previously only possible with high end engineering (crafted to high tolerances/precision/accuracy with the highest end materials), down to lower price points. Garbage technology solves a problem with a gimmick, such as flicking a shock's compression lever "automagically". Strikes me as basically the equivalent of "As Seen on TV" gadgets.

    MTB seems worse than other skill-based hobbies and sports, regarding the gearheads that try to augment themselves by spending money. They can show some results that aren't totally novice with their fancy high end gadgets, but it's no real substitute over a lot of time spent on old fashioned first-hand experience. Desirable/sensible tech tends to find its way into new lower price point products, making old stuff obsolete, but I only get the impression that people are compensating for a personal/character flaw when they buy pricey high end engineering.

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    > MTB seems worse than other skill-based hobbies and sports, regarding the gearheads that try to augment themselves by spending money.

    Oh man, you should see golfers then. Total idiots buying the most expensive clubs, the most expensive gear, and still failing to even hit the ball.

    Any sport, including running and swimming, will have the "I'm rich" gadgets. You could ask what sort of gadget you need for swimming (because for running you at least need good running shoes), but let me introduce you to the whole world of wrist-worn gadgets, pro eye-wear, and shark-skin-like Speedos!

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon View Post
    Well, let's talk about this. With this attitude, we would still be riding rigid bikes with clamp brakes. But technological progress is good – when indeed it's good – and that's why we have awesome suspension, awesome hydraulic brakes, better geometry, better frames, better derailleurs, etc.

    Arguably, suspension alone helps mediocre bike riders plow through a bit more difficult terrain.

    So technology and progress itself is NOT the problem.

    What's the problem is garbage technology. That the EI system clearly is.
    Sorry i wasn't more clear. I meant that it's a common problem to have designs or devices that appear to be helpful but are ultimately hindering the rider.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon View Post
    Probably because of that even the man who is the main designer of the whole system Nico Vouilloz, has the thing ripped out and basically broken and velcroed onto the bike, like this:

    Pro bike: Nico Vouilloz's Lapierre Spicy Team - BikeRadar
    You know the article states why he did what he did and it isn't because the whole thing was trash. If it was trash wouldn't he have just removed it from the bike in the first place? He even went as far as modifying the ei battery to be small enough to just last one days worth of racing. That doesn't sound like something that fundamentally doesn't work. I'm not discounting you had a very bad experience with the ei system. Shit happens and it sucks.

    The e:i control unit is velcro'd to the head tube instead of being mounted on the steerer, keeping it out of danger and aiding quick removal:

  29. #29
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    If it's such a good idea, why did they drop it? Probably because it doesn't work. Remember K2/Noleen tried this many years ago.

    Will we eventually have electronically controlled shocks (like on my car). Of course.

    Is the E:I anywhere near perfection or acceptable? No. At this stage, it's a gimmick. They should just concentrate on a more efficient suspension design than all that E:I and flashy explaining-video crap.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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    You all can say what you want about ei. I still like it. Maybe I would be better off with a thumb mounted lockout switch, but it works for the trails I ride. I've taken my bike to Thailand, and ridden it on the trails of Ohio and Indiana. I prefer not to have to think about things like what gear I'm in, hence the benefit of 1x, and don't want to have to remember to flip the lockout switch, so the ei setup works for me. I understand that it might not be for everyone, but it does work for me. I rode with a manual lockout for quite some time before getting my bike with ei, and I understood when I needed it and when I didn't, but it is much easier to just not have to think about it. Are there times that I wish it would unlock and it doesn't, certainly. Are there times that I wish it would lock out and it wouldn't. I can't say that there ever have been. I can understand how some would, but for those people, ei may not be the option. Just because it doesn't work for you, doesn't mean that it's a bad system.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    If it's such a good idea, why did they drop it? Probably because it doesn't work. Remember K2/Noleen tried this many years ago.

    Will we eventually have electronically controlled shocks (like on my car). Of course.

    Is the E:I anywhere near perfection or acceptable? No. At this stage, it's a gimmick. They should just concentrate on a more efficient suspension design than all that E:I and flashy explaining-video crap.
    That's silly. They should stop improving it just cuz some blokes complain about it? Where would the world be if engineers thought like that huh? You should tell Team Sky to stop the sillyness as well? What's also hilarious is that most have ignored the posters who have had positive experiences in favor of the one doing all the loud complaining. Yay?

    https://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/ne...-s-disk-50422/

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The way I see it, any delay in absorbing a bump, no matter how small, is time that the suspension is not working and it will be transmitting that initial shock to the rider, which is what you don't want. This is why the previous electronic systems, specialized brain systems, inertia valves, and other attempts at this have worked so poorly. It has to ready to absorb before the bump, not adjust after it's started. The technology will eventually come, for sure, but we just aren't anywhere near it right now.
    The delay is the FATAL flaw in this type of system.

    In F1 active suspension days, the actual race track was programmed in to the suspension. It knew every mm of track before the car even got to the track. Try that on your mountain bike.

    Electric production car suspension really isn't very smart, it just has a few responses programmed in for general circumstances.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    This is always what I thought about the inertia valves. The technology came from racing trucks as I recall. Seems like a little extra initial bump in those suspensions, especially considering the tire size and terrain would be less important than on a bike where you feel every little ripple.
    I worked on the first offroad interia valve shacks with the original inventor/patent holder. We used them on Citroen Rally Raid car and won the Paris/Peking race in our first race with them.

    The way people have tried to use them since is sad. It's more than putting a weight inside a shock to bounce up and down. or trying to control it with a "brain".

    As for electronics, we found we could beat electronics soundly, every time, with intelligently designed mechanical systems that ALWAYS respond in real time. Analog time, just like the terrain. No digital. No sampling. No delay. No batteries,

  34. #34
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    Totally with you jdmbird83. I have a 2015 Zesty 529 and I love the bike and the e:i system. I've been mountain biking for about 10 years and I've owned and ridden a lot of bikes. The Lapierre is my favorite, so far. I've owned it for about 2 years and have never had a problem with the bike or the e:i system. That said, there is a bit of room for improvement. I eliminated the offset battery tray and replaced the battery with a larger version with longer run time mounted directly to the downtube with velcro straps.

    To each their own. Just ride and have fun!

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    When the system was first introduced Lapierre had included a 3 position handlebar mounted thumb switch. In later revisions they removed the thumb switch. It would be awesome if they took that a step further and added their servo to the front lockout ala fullsprint. That would be awesome imo to have a thumb operated f+r electric lockout. Then regardless of condition or terrain, the rider could choose the setting or allow ei system to do it for them. The ei systems weakness is that the user cannot easily switch between modes like with normal remote. They should address this point first but down the line add the front fork. For me I'd probably keep it in manual mode and flip between the presets, open, locked, or pedal.

    The servo I presume is a rc type servo so it wouldn't be impossible to proto something up. Machining a mount for a front damper lockout and control would be hard for the diy-er though. I should forward this to Nico lol.

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