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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by akiracornell View Post
    Sounds impressive. I hope this kind of quality control persists. Because thats the only chance a resin fiber will age well with the kind of serious, prolonged abuse of many years of hard riding.
    Dealing with composites almost daily in my engineering biz, the biggest enemy of CF composites is still humidity. Water acts as a plasticizer causing the resin to degrade (soften) over time, faster than UV can. Add to the equation aluminum inserts like the threaded BB inserts and you have a bad situation. The galvanic effect of water in the aluminum-carbon matrix interface causes the aluminum to corrode quickly and affects the aluminum-carbon-resin bond.

    The most important thing in a good CF frame is the pre and post-prep. This includes a coating with high water resistance (we can never be 100% water proof) to seal off the carbon fiber composite from the environment (someone above also mentioned UV). Aluminum insert components with passivating treatments (corrosion cladding, phosphating, or non conductive treatments) are also important... I just wonder how many of the bike manufacturers follow this practice.

    More basic info from Boeing here:
    Aero 07 - Design for Corrosion

    Bear in mind that carbon and other composites have been used in 30-year-old planes that are still flying today, when the initial design life of the composite parts was 10 years. These planes aren't falling out of the sky.

    The important thing to know about your CF frames and components is "KEEP IT DRY". Wipe them off after your ride in mud, rain etc, and they will last a long time (barring any unfortunate accidents).

    -S

    P.S. I'd say my 07 S-Works SJ frame will easily last 30 years in its current state.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    Dealing with composites almost daily in my engineering biz, the biggest enemy of CF is still humidity. Water acts as a plasticizer causing the resin to degrade (soften) over time, faster than UV can. Add to the equation aluminum inserts like the threaded BB inserts and you have a bad situation. The galvanic effect of water in the aluminum-carbon matrix interface causes the aluminum to corrode quickly and affects the aluminum-carbon-resin bond.

    The most important thing in a good CF frame is the pre and post-prep. This includes a coating with high water resistance (we can never be 100% water proof) to seal off the carbon fiber composite from the environment (someone above also mentioned UV). Aluminum insert components with passivating treatments (corrosion cladding, phosphating, or non conductive treatments) are also important... I just wonder how many of the bike manufacturers follow this practice.

    More basic info from Boeing here:
    Aero 07 - Design for Corrosion

    Bear in mind that carbon and other composites have been used in 30-year-old planes that are still flying today, when the initial design life of the composite parts was 10 years. These planes aren't falling out of the sky.

    The important thing to know about your CF frames and components is "KEEP IT DRY". Wipe them off after your ride in mud, rain etc, and they will last a long time (barring any unfortunate accidents).

    -S

    P.S. I'd say my 07 S-Works SJ frame will easily last 30 years in its current state.
    I second what this person has to say. The first thing that came to my mind was corrosion. Aluminum parts on a carbon frame that's exposed to the elements will cause some corrosion over time. I coat any aluminum or steel that's touching carbon with tef-gel on racing sailboats. Yes, sailboats are exposed to salt water, but there's no reason why not to do the same treatment to a bike IMO.
    "Bound to cover just a little more ground"

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by playdead View Post
    I second what this person has to say. The first thing that came to my mind was corrosion. Aluminum parts on a carbon frame that's exposed to the elements will cause some corrosion over time. I coat any aluminum or steel that's touching carbon with tef-gel on racing sailboats. Yes, sailboats are exposed to salt water, but there's no reason why not to do the same treatment to a bike IMO.
    You should see what water does on an improperly prepared carbon aluminum honeycomb plate.....

    Just curious, how thick a gel coat do you marine guys use on the regular boat hull? I personally prefer using a base layer of fiberglass on aluminum inserts for corrosion prevention.

    -S

    Sent from my Kindle Fire using Tapatalk 2

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    You should see what water does on an improperly prepared carbon aluminum honeycomb plate.....

    Just curious, how thick a gel coat do you marine guys use on the regular boat hull? I personally prefer using a base layer of fiberglass on aluminum inserts for corrosion prevention.

    -S

    Sent from my Kindle Fire using Tapatalk 2
    A little bit goes a long way. It's good to take the parts out and re apply once a year. We also use Duralec.

    Yes, I will put a layer of fiberglass between carbon and aluminum or steel. It's amazing what salt water will can do!
    "Bound to cover just a little more ground"

  5. #30
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    I have had my Tallboy since it first came out and the frame looks brand new. All of the non carbon parts on my bike (chainrings, cassette, derailleurs, bb) are wearing out much faster than the frame has.
    I plan on riding my Tallboy C until the day she dies... Hopefully I can out last it.
    Check out www.zencyclery.com for fully customizable, handbuilt wheels.

    www.facebook.com/zencyclerywheels

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biggs88 View Post
    If there are these life span concerns, why not stick with Titanium?
    Hmm, maybe because the expected life of a carbon part can be longer?


    Magura

  7. #32
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    I won't sell this frame as I'd make a shitty loss so I'm keeping it until it or I break
    Santa Cruz Blur TRc

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