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  1. #26
    I am a pathetic rider...
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    IMO weights don't matter. I ride a 40 lb steel hardtail, but it is indestructible so I don't care. I can pedal that thing anywhere I want, and technique is the only thing limiting my manuevarability with the bike. Case in point, I demoed an 08 C'dale Rize, which the rep told me was around 30 pounds. I thought, oh cool, a bike that weighs 3/4 of what mine does, should be really easy to move it around and climb and stuff. nope, the suspesnsion sucked up way more of my pedalling efficiency and body input than those extra 10 pounds ever did. IMO a good suspension design (or none at all ) is way more noticeable and important than the weight of your bike.
    Save the Earth, Ride a Cyclist

  2. #27
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    If you don't race... don't sweat the weight of your sled. Weight = watts burned on the course, the less you burn on the course the more you have for the sprint at the end of the race. That's why racers pay monster money for super light wheel sets and other parts. Happy Trails

  3. #28
    ride hard take risks
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    Next time you pick up a beer think weight
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  4. #29
    wuss
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    I just lost a pound from my fork and the difference was very noticable. I then changed my wheelset and lost a pound there too (maby even a bit more) and that was a huge difference. I proceeded to lose weight in a few other places (where possible), but that difference was not really huge.

    I would still say that losing weight can make a huge difference. Before changing the fork I felt like the bike was "front heavy". After changing the fork it felt very balanced (so your milage might vary). The wheelset was a killer though, now I just hold the new one will hold up.

  5. #30
    Alien Surf Team
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    I've been using a Camalback Classic, which is about the smallest you can get, 2L of water and virtually no storage. My new Mule showed up yesterday and I filled it with all kinds us useless stuff. I did replace the 3L with my 2L but I have everything in there now. I even have binoculars. hahaha

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppew
    It seems people are willing to pay big bucks for shaving off pounds on a bike. I will see a 10% decrese in weight costing 2X more. What is the big benefit? I weigh 200lbs. How much difference will I feel between a 33lb bike and a 29lb bike? I assume it is not one to one, but could I possibly loose 10lbs and make up for the 4 lb loss in bike weight? Is bike weight less important for bigger people as it constitutes a smaller percentage of total weight?

    Thanks for the help.

    Wojtek
    Well, the comments here IMO are one sided. Kind of reminiscent of other threads. But I'm sure you realize you're posting on the AM forum.

    Sure, if your thing is going for 5" drops, finding gnarly tough terrain, and ski area DH's, weight is less important than strength.

    If your thing, even if you're not a racer, is riding fast on single track and climbs, e.g. mostly XC/trail riding, yeah, 5+lbs makes a huge difference. Also these bikes tend to have faster more agile geometry. Besides noticing on the climb and accelerations, you can feel and use the difference else where. For instance, lifting the front wheel over some terrain or bunny hopping an obstacle, or lifting and moving the front end to help steer the bike, and at high speeds.

    Some say it's the rider. Of course it is and it works both ways. The best DH'ers will do great on HT's. They'll just be a little more beat up at the end of the day. That's no different than if you took a 30+lb machine out (and kept up) with the racers all day.

    I'm sure Lance A and Steve P can keep up with most on a whatever they choose in their repsective categories. Mario Andretti can out drive me in my sports car with him in a family sedan. That doesn't mean I don't like the agility of my Z over my Xterra.

    So it really comes down to what you want out of riding.

  7. #32
    MEDBLKANOSCBLT2RP23
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    In an "Ideal" world, you might want your bike no more than 15% of your body weight taking in count your %fat is 20 or less.

    Ok, I just made that up, but it does make sense with what you can get and build up in 2008 as a trail or AM bike without much effort. I'd go 20% for DH and 12% for xc while we are playing with the numbers.

    Max bike wt= "body wt" x .15
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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by FreakKit

    First, IMO I believe the most important point is to have fun when you ride.

    FreakKit
    I totally agree with that. I enjoyed doing all-mountain riding with my crappy 47 lb Wal-Mart mongoose. Seriously

    I now enjoy riding my 08 Giant Reign (31-32 lb). Weight is not the most important thing in choosing a bike. Primarily, I believe you need to get a bike that is built for your kind of riding. Don't get a cross-country racer unless you are in fact a cross country racer - (or a rider who mostly rides smooth trails without much of descents and you have plenty of money to burn). If you actually do all-mountain riding, get an all-mountain bike.

    All else being equal, less wieght is generally a good thing. However, there are few situations in bikes and bike parts that this is the case. In other words, don't give too much priority to weight.

    But hey, if you want to spend your money on components to lighten your ride, choose wisely and enjoy.

    I'd like to try this water bottle experiment people have been talking about in this thread, but a gotta get a bottle cage, cause my hydration pack won't have the same effect...

  9. #34
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    i guess some people notice weight more than others, i changed out my s works captains on my 2009 SJ for maxis minions dual ply 2.35 downhill tires, theres a noticable difference when i pick the bike up but when riding it all i notice is that the bike rides a hell of a lot better especially on downhill trails

  10. #35
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    For a 200# rider, the diff between a 33 & a 29 bike is small, but noticeable (bt,dt); the trick of it all is WHERE the weight is. Lighter wheels FEEL like more of a gain, as do the tires, of course. A lighter crank will only be noticed by an extremely sensitive & experienced rider. Smaller differences, like going to a carbon bar from an alu bar, can be more noticeable than the reflected weight savings. Again, same with the fork. You get a nimble-feeling front end that way, easy to loft.

    Most important, for riders OUR size (right now, I'm at 230), is durability, and there, my XLT has surpassed every expectation!
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  11. #36
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    If you think about it, I think we use 80% of our time in the saddle climbing and the rest DHing.

    Of course weight is important, if you don`t take to ridiculous numbers. AM bike in the 13kg can be achieved without difficulty! Even stock bikes weight that and doesn`t cost an arm and leg!

    For more agressive ridding a bike in the 15kg is normal! This bike will climb worse than the 13 kg and will do it worse if the fork can`t be shrink so that headangle and seat angle have better numbers to the job!

    For me, I`m not a weight freak! I want a bike that I can use any where, any time, without loosing my head. That has some "price"!

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by pakdoc
    In an "Ideal" world, you might want your bike no more than 15% of your body weight taking in count your %fat is 20 or less.

    Ok, I just made that up, but it does make sense with what you can get and build up in 2008 as a trail or AM bike without much effort. I'd go 20% for DH and 12% for xc while we are playing with the numbers.

    Max bike wt= "body wt" x .15
    I'm curious if there is actually a ratio like the one suggested above. 15% seems too low for AM however.

    I weigh 160lbs, which would mean that my bike should weigh 24lbs (which is about what my SS hardtail weighs). I can't imagine getting my 34lbs Moment down to 24lbs...I'd like to get it down to 30lbs but that is difficult also.

  13. #38
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowLow
    I'm curious if there is actually a ratio like the one suggested above. 15% seems too low for AM however.

    I weigh 160lbs, which would mean that my bike should weigh 24lbs (which is about what my SS hardtail weighs). I can't imagine getting my 34lbs Moment down to 24lbs...I'd like to get it down to 30lbs but that is difficult also.
    No problem just post over here and have your credit card in hand.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/weight-weenies/

    These guys can help with the price search to help that credit card along.

    http://www.spadout.com/c/mountain-biking/
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  14. #39
    Trying a little
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    bike weight doesn't matter for the first 1 hour of the ride. It matters for the last 1 hour.
    That is true no matter if you are 70lbs or 300lbs.

    I never apologize. I'm sorry, but that's just the way I am.

  15. #40
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    I also agree with worldwind.

    So then here is my list of how important things are, starting with the most important… to achieve the maximum speed and performance.

    1. skill, yours.
    2. strength and endurance, yours.
    3. weight, yours.
    4. your bikes handling characteristics.
    5. your bikes weight.
    and THEN you split out the bike weights:

    5a. rotating weight
    5b static weight

  16. #41
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    True... last hour is really grm weenie! Even mud weight!

  17. #42
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    There is a parting thought for this thread that is a given, for the experienced riders out there, but may not be quite so obvious for the guy who is still testing the shallow end of this sport.

    For a pro rider or a committed enthusiast a few ounces can make a world of difference under certain circumstances. Here are two examples.

    You can pretty much count on a number of things happening as the price of a component goes up. Weight goes down and adjustability and functionality go up. So that as an added bonus to less weight for a part, you get a better shifting derailleur, or a smoother turning bottom bracket or hub.
    As you approach the stratosphere of cog sets you get less weight and hardened profiled cogs that shift faster and quieter.

    The novice rider can’t take full advantage of these nuances so all the extra cost is not fully realized, therefore not justified.

    The other example relates to the finesse a pro rider is able to achieve in his or her riding style. With ample experience a rider can take a very light bike through terrain that would destroy a heaver stronger bike in the hands of a novice.

    So with this in mind to get back to the original post, it becomes clear that for different riders, weight has a different value.

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