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  1. #1
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    how to convert my hybrid to a ok trail bike

    ok i have a 2014 giant escape 2 w and i want to upgrade it and i want to make it ok to try a trail or 2

  2. #2
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    A hybrid will never transform into a proper mtb, no matter the upgrades. You could fit the widest, knobbiest tyres the frame/fork will clear to help with traction, fit a wider bar to aid control, but it will stll be a hybrid, albeit a tiny bit more comfortable on unpaved roads.

    To ride actual trails safely and enjoy doing so, you need to pick a bike designed for the job. it doesn't have to be the latest and greatest blingy stuff, but something with geometry and components actually designed for riding offroad.

    If your wish is to ride trails, save some cash to spend on a proper mtb, don't waste them trying to turn the escape into something it's not.

  3. #3
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    No upgrades. Just try it on a trail or two as is and you'll discover that the bike just isn't designed for trail use.

    Just like you can't really take a Camry offroad by simply putting treadier tires on it.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    No upgrades. Just try it on a trail or two as is and you'll discover that the bike just isn't designed for trail use.

    Just like you can't really take a Camry offroad by simply putting treadier tires on it.
    Never say never. I think it's a wonderful idea!

    how to convert my hybrid to a ok trail bike-lift-sedan-camry.jpg

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Never say never. I think it's a wonderful idea!

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    Epic response.


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  6. #6
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    While much of what has been said makes sense, if you are a good enough rider you can ride almost anything almost anywhere. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5z1fSpZNXhU

    Quality Wheels 700C Hybrid Wheel > Components > Wheels > Road Wheels | Jenson USA
    Schwalbe Rocket Ron 29" Tire > Components > Tires > Dirt Tires | Jenson USA

    I bought the rim and tire for my wife's Giant Cypress and we switch front tires when she rides trails. She only rides easy beginner trails but it works fine for her.

    Not sure what hubs you have, that rim is for a 9mm QR. I believe that is wha tthe Escape has.

  7. #7
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    i hope that this geometry(copied and passed because couldnt spell it) term everyone keeps telling me about, can be purchased at walmart because i have no clue of this and yes i went to college, and graduated from high school but know nothing about it.lol im broke and unemployed at the moment. So any bike more then the $65.00 i payed for this is a bit high for me but i would like to try and ride a trail to keep stress down

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    all specs for the bike are in my profile

  9. #9
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    For your budget, I'd recommend either hiking or trail running.

    Sorry.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  10. #10
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    so dont even try until i can afford a better bike or to make a car like payment for a true mtb
    basically.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by possum357 View Post
    so dont even try until i can afford a better bike or to make a car like payment for a true mtb
    basically.
    There is a huge spectrum of mountain bikes between a spanking new $8,000 carbon wunderbike and a $300 Craigslist find.

    I'm of the opinion that $65 will not get you something that can do trails without falling to pieces. You could probably get some decent hiking boots for that much though.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

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    Possum I'm sure you're playing possum, but I'm going to repeat Curveball and say go ride it. Yes your tires don't have knobs but I've ridden plenty of street tires on dirt trail. If you start going fast enough to slide-out, then you'll want to buy some knobbies. The joy of riding in some tree cover and hearing those trail sounds will relax.
    oops I wasn't clipped in

  13. #13
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    Assuming you aren't riding anything gnarly...For the cheapest entry into MTBing, I would save $150 and watch Craigslist. You're looking for a fully rigid Trek, Gary Fisher, Specialized mountain bike. Better yet, join a local group and ask if someone has a bike you can borrow. Someone there may be able to help you find an inexpensive starter bike too.


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    Quote Originally Posted by jim c View Post
    Possum I'm sure you're playing possum, but I'm going to repeat Curveball and say go ride it. Yes your tires don't have knobs but I've ridden plenty of street tires on dirt trail. If you start going fast enough to slide-out, then you'll want to buy some knobbies. The joy of riding in some tree cover and hearing those trail sounds will relax.
    thank you i don't want to hike i stay in florida so that's just walking and i don't need to drive to a trail to do so in soflo lol im not mad or trying to come of rude but i payed 65 for my bike with my last check and i'm just trying to stay positive and i still am willing to upgrade just don't have room for 2 bike in my box of a house and and was looking for advice on what would it take to make it a ok not a great mtb just something to learn to fix and ride on while i learn to repair my main means of transportation thank you for your reply

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim c View Post
    Possum I'm sure you're playing possum, but I'm going to repeat Curveball and say go ride it. Yes your tires don't have knobs but I've ridden plenty of street tires on dirt trail. If you start going fast enough to slide-out, then you'll want to buy some knobbies. The joy of riding in some tree cover and hearing those trail sounds will relax.
    I used to ride my touring road bike on my local trails. I only did it when it was very dry and I have 30 years of mountain biking experience on my side. I kept to the easiest trails on my commute home from work.

    It can be done, but requires a good deal of skill to not crash.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  16. #16
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    ive been riding since 92 i grew up in miami i live 20 miles away in ft. lauderdale is
    humidity a problem

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    If you're in Fl, you're probably safe to ride easier trails on a hybrid. That's what hybrids are for, roads and easy trails. Take it easy on the sandy turns.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    If you're in Fl, you're probably safe to ride easier trails on a hybrid. That's what hybrids are for, roads and easy trails. Take it easy on the sandy turns.
    where i ride they have lots of roots

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    Quote Originally Posted by possum357 View Post
    where i ride they have lots of roots
    Honest answer, if you're riding on rooty trails, unless you absolutely crawl over those sections you'll probably find yourself without a rideable bike in the near future. I would worry about three things on a hybrid over rough terrain, top tube and head tube juncture, wheel integrity, and chainstays. Those bikes are suitable for smooth trails, even flow trails if you roll most things, but not rougher stuff. Find you a few smooth trails and enjoy the bike.

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  20. #20
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    I'll just add this - Ride what you have! If you only have a hybrid and a new bike isn't doable, then ride the hell out of that hybrid. Don't throw good money after bad by trying to make something that it isn't.

    My RIP9 was down for a few days but I wasn't about to miss a beautiful day, so I hopped on my hybrid and headed out for a ride...... Remember, it's not the bike, it's the rider.

    how to convert my hybrid to a ok trail bike-expedition-1-min.jpghow to convert my hybrid to a ok trail bike-expedition-2-min.jpg

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Junersun View Post
    Epic response.


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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Never say never. I think it's a wonderful idea!

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    Too be fair, that is more like hybrid atop a mountain bike. There's a jeep or truck frame and suspension under the body.

    To summarize: hybrids aren't built for trail use, hell, they aren't even good road bikes. They are always heavy due to the use of cheap steel or aluminum, placing them squarely in the bottom tier of bikes. Their purpose is to provide a compliant ride along city park trails, which are extremely sanitized and smooth.

    There is nothing that says you cannot ride your bike as is down a trail. Just understand that trail time will accelerate the bike's demise.

    I'd suggest no more than putting the fattest tires you can find on it to provide bump absorption and sand float, and saving for an eventual purchase of a true trail bike.

    Also, the typical car payment does not get one onto a starter trail bike, unless maybe you are financing a new Ferrarri. The $350 bikes don't come with components durable enough for trail use, and the frames are made of cheaper, heavier metals. $750 is where trail bikes start. If you want to keep it within a (typical) car payment, you have to go used.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    Honest answer, if you're riding on rooty trails, unless you absolutely crawl over those sections you'll probably find yourself without a rideable bike in the near future. I would worry about three things on a hybrid over rough terrain, top tube and head tube juncture, wheel integrity, and chainstays. Those bikes are suitable for smooth trails, even flow trails if you roll most things, but not rougher stuff. Find you a few smooth trails and enjoy the bike.

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    ill have to look for some trail like the ones your talking about in my area but this is why im ask so i dont break and thing i cant learn to fix thank you for your reply

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    Too be fair, that is more like hybrid atop a mountain bike. There's a jeep or truck frame and suspension under the body.

    To summarize: hybrids aren't built for trail use, hell, they aren't even good road bikes. They are always heavy due to the use of cheap steel or aluminum, placing them squarely in the bottom tier of bikes. Their purpose is to provide a compliant ride along city park trails, which are extremely sanitized and smooth.

    There is nothing that says you cannot ride your bike as is down a trail. Just understand that trail time will accelerate the bike's demise.

    I'd suggest no more than putting the fattest tires you can find on it to provide bump absorption and sand float, and saving for an eventual purchase of a true trail bike.

    Also, the typical car payment does not get one onto a starter trail bike, unless maybe you are financing a new Ferrarri. The $350 bikes don't come with components durable enough for trail use, and the frames are made of cheaper, heavier metals. $750 is where trail bikes start. If you want to keep it within a (typical) car payment, you have to go used.
    i don't have many choices as far as trails go in so. florida and im not drivin since my car has died and i just wanted to know if there was parts i could buy to make my bike last a little longer til i can buy a new bike im planing on moving to NC and dont want to just stay to riding in the street

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by possum357 View Post
    ok i have a 2014 giant escape 2 w and i want to upgrade it and i want to make it ok to try a trail or 2
    The only sensible upgrade is tires. Put on the biggest tires that will fit -- something like the Kenda Kross might fit.

    Kenda Kross Supreme Tire > Components > Tires | Jenson USA

    You will be surprised at what you can ride even with normal hybrid tires though.

    Just keep your wheels on the ground so you don't overstress and fatigue the frame -- bicycle testing standards are different depending on intended use.
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    Mountaining biking started on "klunkers" in the 70's by a bunch of guys who took road bikes and converted them over to handle off road riding.

    To say you can't make a hybrid bike into a mountain bike is ignorant. The most important factor to riding is the rider itself.

    Slap on some grippier tires and ride trails that you feel confident you can ride to get a better understanding of how the bike feels in certain situations. Key point is to just have fun.
    My bike is all tricked out. It has pedals, a handle bar, a seat and two wheels! H8tRs gunna H8t!

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiquidSpin View Post
    Mountaining biking started on "klunkers" in the 70's by a bunch of guys who took road bikes and converted them over to handle off road riding.

    To say you can't make a hybrid bike into a mountain bike is ignorant. The most important factor to riding is the rider itself.

    Slap on some grippier tires and ride trails that you feel confident you can ride to get a better understanding of how the bike feels in certain situations. Key point is to just have fun.
    I was just reading on Repack Rider's website. He was one of those guys and says he broke a frame every few months.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiquidSpin View Post
    Mountaining biking started on "klunkers" in the 70's by a bunch of guys who took road bikes and converted them over to handle off road riding.

    To say you can't make a hybrid bike into a mountain bike is ignorant. The most important factor to riding is the rider itself.

    Slap on some grippier tires and ride trails that you feel confident you can ride to get a better understanding of how the bike feels in certain situations. Key point is to just have fun.
    Those early bikes were most likely steel frames, and decent quality steel, which is a totally different paradigm than what is available today. Also with a hybrid you have impact angle and leverage issues due to the design of the bike that are not present on performance minded bikes be they road or mountain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I was just reading on Repack Rider's website. He was one of those guys and says he broke a frame every few months.
    Those guys were racing and really riding them past the bikes limitations. I've seen people take cross bikes and ride on some pretty gnarly XC trails but they aren't hitting the trails as if they were on a dedicated mountain bike. Again, the riders skills and smarts is the most important factor.

    Sure it's not ideal but it's possible to take a hybrid and make a few tweaks to make it rideable on certain single tracks. You may not be the quickest and it may be harder to handle but certainly possible.
    My bike is all tricked out. It has pedals, a handle bar, a seat and two wheels! H8tRs gunna H8t!

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    In Costa Rica we say "la flecha no hace al indio" (the arrow doesn't define the Indian), referring as how the blingest bike won't make you a good rider even if the Pope himself blesses it every week.

    My first experience on MTB, was on a long bumpy trail, with a 3 mile down section. I remember how I enjoyed that descent. And my bike was a suspensionless-totally rigid-steel-framed horse. Cheapest components ever, plastic v-brakes, a huge crankset matched to a 7speed 14-28 cassette. My wheels ended up totally bent and my hands were aching a lot.

    But I was fine and I did a lot of stuff other guys wouldn't do with aluminum bikes, and nice front suspensions. (carbon and full suspensions were something from outer space at that time).

    Gladly, I've been able to upgrade to a better bike, and now I ride with more comfort, but any bike will take you anywhere if you are capable of riding it (and it doesn't fall apart in the mean time).

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiquidSpin View Post
    Those guys were racing and really riding them past the bikes limitations.
    And riding a hybrid on most mountain bike trails that I know of is riding past the bike's limitations.


    Quote Originally Posted by LiquidSpin View Post
    I've seen people take cross bikes and ride on some pretty gnarly XC trails but they aren't hitting the trails as if they were on a dedicated mountain bike.
    I'm one of those guys and you are correct, I don't bomb downhill on rocky/rooty trails on my CX. Had a scary moment this weekend when I was descending in the drops and launched up and over a big root with a bit of a drop behind it.

    Quote Originally Posted by LiquidSpin View Post
    Again, the riders skills and smarts is the most important factor.

    Sure it's not ideal but it's possible to take a hybrid and make a few tweaks to make it rideable on certain single tracks. You may not be the quickest and it may be harder to handle but certainly possible.
    Yes, agreed. I was just pointing out that saying those guys took road bikes and converted them to handle off road riding without revealing that they broke frames like crazy was leaving some of the details out. And they weren't really road bikes but more beefy cruiser bikes. You can't really make a hybrid bike into a mountain bike. You can ride it on some mountain bike trails but it isn't really a mountain bike any more than my CX is a mountain bike. Actually, I think there was a thread on this, is it the bike or where you are riding it?
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    And riding a hybrid on most mountain bike trails that I know of is riding past the bike's limitations.




    I'm one of those guys and you are correct, I don't bomb downhill on rocky/rooty trails on my CX. Had a scary moment this weekend when I was descending in the drops and launched up and over a big root with a bit of a drop behind it.



    Yes, agreed. I was just pointing out that saying those guys took road bikes and converted them to handle off road riding without revealing that they broke frames like crazy was leaving some of the details out. And they weren't really road bikes but more beefy cruiser bikes. You can't really make a hybrid bike into a mountain bike. You can ride it on some mountain bike trails but it isn't really a mountain bike any more than my CX is a mountain bike. Actually, I think there was a thread on this, is it the bike or where you are riding it?
    Well, to be honest they did mention how their bikes would break. There's even a documentary on the origins of mountain biking called "Klunkers" which shows how they damaged the frames and components. This is where they started to weld extra metal bits to make the frame sturdier of course this lead to the creation of a bike specifically designed for off road use.

    When it comes to "can you make a hybrid into a mountain bike" I guess that's where we disagree. If it's not a cheaply built hybrid I do believe one could customize it to and go on single track trails. Again, the rider would have to be competent and skilled.

    A while back a group of my friends went mountain biking and one of the guys who didn't own a mountain just brought his commuter bike. A cheap 1990's commuter bike with some thick tires but still thinner than any MTB tire. I laughed and said to everyone "Get ready to call 9-11" and "Dude are you nuts?"

    He got through the trail dead last but he still had fun and he still made it through. If he were a more advanced rider I'm pretty sure he could've kept up with us. It made me rethink what is possible and what is not.

    Check this insane video out:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2_nDekAyZY

    I'm not saying the bike in the video is appropriate for the DH trail but still amazing at what is possible when ridden by someone who knows what they're doing. Will that bike last? Hell no. Did it hold up to some crazy ass riding? Yes. Yes it did. Is it safe? Hell, no. hahaha
    My bike is all tricked out. It has pedals, a handle bar, a seat and two wheels! H8tRs gunna H8t!

  33. #33
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    btw this is my bike and me before i set out on this fine 420 for a ride and volunteer work hava a great one
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails how to convert my hybrid to a ok trail bike-img_20170420_140931-2-.jpg  


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    Pretty sure this whole conversation can be easily summed up with the phrase, "just because you can do something doesn't mean you should". Growing up, I've ridden a bike beyond its limits and the fork broke off just below the head tube. Luckily, I landed in the grass.

    The good news is there are cheap used bikes out there and they don't have to cost even $100. Might just take a little patience to find one, but not impossible at all.

    Side note: I dig the look of those stickers. Nice customization dude!

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    Screw all the haters, I see plenty of ppl rocking cyclocross(road bikes with knobbies) bikes on the trails I ride my enduro bike.

    The biggest upgrade you can make is dirt specific tires. Check out these Schwalbes that are in the size that fits your current bike and are 76% off.

    Schwalbe Rocket Ron 700C Tire > Components > Tires > Dirt Tires | Jenson USA

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    Great looking bike, dude!
    Unfortunately, it's not suited for MTB.

    If you want, you can give it go and test it on the trails. Maybe you can have a great time.

  37. #37
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    Crazy that I saw this thread yesterday, and found the remains of a hybrid with knobby tires on an "all mountain" trail today.
    Uh...
    how to convert my hybrid to a ok trail bike-received_10212290694765572.jpg

    how to convert my hybrid to a ok trail bike-received_10212290692885525.jpg

    I have a hybrid, btw. It stays on the pavement, like it was made for.

  38. #38
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    The widest tires the frame will fit in the frame run at the lowest feasible pressure would be the best upgrade IMO. Second would be a wide (~750mm) handlebar which will definitely increase control and confidence over rough terrain. Beyond that I wouldn't do much anything else except get rid of that squishy seat and save my pennies for a mtb that accepts wider tires and maybe a suspension fork to soften those roots.

    Go ride!
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  39. #39
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    Noapathy summed up the OP's request well. Carrera911xc, you've missed the point... the OP wasn't asking if he could manage to get a CX bike down a trail, he asked if HIS bike is ok for regular trail use, and outside of manicured park paths, it's not.

    The Escape 2, of which I have assembled and tuned probably 60, doesn't even qualify as a hybrid to me as it doesn't have a suspension fork, which is the selling point of most hyrbids.

    This is more of an 'urban' bike, which is to say, a road bike with a *slightly* beefier frame to handle the occasional smooth curb hop, and fatter tires to help absorb shock. The bike is great for regular use on street, sidewalk, and manicured trail, but that's about it. It's a bottom tier bike for Giant ($350-400), and sports componentry that just won't take the requirements of regular trail use for long. You won't be hitting roots at speed and coming off the trail without bent rims.

    No one is being a hater here. We simply don't want the OP to go out and ruin a nice bike he probably had to save up to get.

    Put the fattest tires that will fit under those road brakes and take it easy on some smooth soflo trails while saving for something that won't be endangered by the first 1.5" rock you come across.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

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    ^^^Thanks for putting it more eloquently. I also don't want someone to get hurt when the thing breaks in the middle of nowhere.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    Noapathy summed up the OP's request well. Carrera911xc, you've missed the point... the OP wasn't asking if he could manage to get a CX bike down a trail, he asked if HIS bike is ok for regular trail use, and outside of manicured park paths, it's not.
    I guess I interpreted the question a little differently


    Quote Originally Posted by possum357 View Post
    ok i have a 2014 giant escape 2 w and i want to upgrade it and i want to make it ok to try a trail or 2
    If that's all I had and had no money for another bike I'd give it a go on a trail or 2, even if I had to pick smooth ones and ride a bit conservatively it would still be better than no trail riding at all.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  42. #42
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    For South FL trails - I'd recommend 2.1 knobby tires. OP... build up skills and get acquainted with trail riding, while saving up for a purpose-built MTB.

    Like others have said... it's ALL about the rider.
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    Noapathy summed up the OP's request well. Carrera911xc, you've missed the point... the OP wasn't asking if he could manage to get a CX bike down a trail, he asked if HIS bike is ok for regular trail use, and outside of manicured park paths, it's not.

    The Escape 2, of which I have assembled and tuned probably 60, doesn't even qualify as a hybrid to me as it doesn't have a suspension fork, which is the selling point of most hyrbids.

    This is more of an 'urban' bike, which is to say, a road bike with a *slightly* beefier frame to handle the occasional smooth curb hop, and fatter tires to help absorb shock. The bike is great for regular use on street, sidewalk, and manicured trail, but that's about it. It's a bottom tier bike for Giant ($350-400), and sports componentry that just won't take the requirements of regular trail use for long. You won't be hitting roots at speed and coming off the trail without bent rims.

    No one is being a hater here. We simply don't want the OP to go out and ruin a nice bike he probably had to save up to get.

    Put the fattest tires that will fit under those road brakes and take it easy on some smooth soflo trails while saving for something that won't be endangered by the first 1.5" rock you come across.

    This is very true, I had an escape and very stupidly rode it while intoxicated, i took a very minor fall onto the pavement and I absorbed most of the hit. I got up and the front wheel was completely out of true just from and slightly bent just from the minor fall to pavement.

    I couldn't imagine the rims taking any kind of abuse on a trail.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cayenne_Pepa View Post
    For South FL trails - I'd recommend 2.1 knobby tires. OP... build up skills and get acquainted with trail riding, while saving up for a purpose-built MTB.

    Like others have said... it's ALL about the rider.
    It came with 700x32 tires so I don't think 2.1s will fit.
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  45. #45
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    You can ride it on trails just be careful and go slow.
    A couple years ago I took my Raleigh Misceo and rode to a trailhead. Something inside me told me to try to ride the trails and for some strange reason I listened. I ended up breaking off the plastic chainring guard on a tall tree root, but other than that it handled moderate double track with ease. Granted I was riding a lot more cautiously than Normal, but I was able to do it.
    Just be sure to find some smooth trails and expect to fall from time to time.

  46. #46
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    Put the largest 29er tires you can fit in the frame, or ride the small tires if you must. 29er tires will fit your 700c rims.
    I doubt you are going to easily break the bike going off road and the geometry is not any huge difference that would make it unrideable.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by possum357 View Post
    btw this is my bike and me before i set out on this fine 420 for a ride and volunteer work hava a great one
    My first mountain bike ride was on a road bike -- I heard about mountain bikes and wanted to give mountain biking a try so I took my road bike up a steep four wheel drive road and found that it wasn't that bad. I've also ridden borrowed hybrid on trails when I didn't have my regular mountain bike because I was traveling. Your tires are wide enough -- just go out for a ride. If you don't feel confident on a section of trail, just get off and walk. Have fun!
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    It came with 700x32 tires so I don't think 2.1s will fit.
    The rims are 17mm ID.... same as many 26er mtb wheels running 2.1 tires. Easily works, and about the only change I'd suggest, for sampling trails.

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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by possum357 View Post
    btw this is my bike and me before i set out on this fine 420 for a ride and volunteer work hava a great one
    Right on possum, nothing wrong with that!
    I started "mountain biking" in the mid 80's and guarantee you a had a TON of fun on a bike no where near as nice as yours. As others have said the best investment would be bigger tires for the roots. Other than that maybe pedals and a smaller seat will make it easier to get behind it.

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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cayenne_Pepa View Post
    The rims are 17mm ID.... same as many 26er mtb wheels running 2.1 tires. Easily works, and about the only change I'd suggest, for sampling trails.

    Sent from my HTC6525LVW using Tapatalk
    But will they fit in the frame? It's really more of a flat bar road bike.
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  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    But will they fit in the frame? It's really more of a flat bar road bike.
    My BAD. The best recommendation is 700c x 32/33 gravel or Cross tires.
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  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Bone View Post
    I'll just add this - Ride what you have! If you only have a hybrid and a new bike isn't doable, then ride the hell out of that hybrid. Don't throw good money after bad by trying to make something that it isn't.

    Remember, it's not the bike, it's the rider.

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    Agreed. Now please measure chainstay length of that Frankensteinbike and report back

  53. #53
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    I run 1.9" GEAX Evolutions so I don't have to swap tires for commuting and hitting hard pack trails every week. OP: If you can get that much tire in there, try 25psi min front, 30psi min rear to protect the rims. Avoid rocks, roots, drops and toots.

    Giant has a bike that would fit well for the OP's desires, the ROAM. It has a light duty suspension fork, as it's designed for occasional trail use. Look how much beefier the bike is, just to be a reliable light trail bike:

    how to convert my hybrid to a ok trail bike-escapevsroam.jpg
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