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  1. #1
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    Hardtail vs full suspension for all mountain

    Let's discuss the pros and cons of each, which is better for type of all mountain and what not. I really want a dj bike setup as an all mountain hardtail 1x9. Any reason otherwise. Yes newbie and if this in another thread feel free to direct me to it.

  2. #2
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    DJ geometry sucks for pedalling. specially on long rides, it wont work.

    I migrated from a 5.5in FS bike to an CroMo AM hardtail.

    Pros and cons have been discussed repeatedly and are a bit obvious really,

    HT: Pros: better pedalling efficiency, reduced weight (will depend but overall yes), simplicity and low maintenance. Cons: No suspension (duh)

    FS: Pros: Suspension Cons: pedalling efficiency, even though with effective suspension systems these can help traction and have damn good pedalling efficiency.

    I know I'm sounding like hardtails are better than FS bikes. I dont mean to, but just to have the advantage of suspension is enough. Now, right now I have a HT, but when I get the chance (and the money) I will buy a FS bike. I miss my old FS bike as much as I love my HT. Hardtails will give you a harsher ride, but it will eventually make you a better rider.

  3. #3
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    Depends a lot on where you ride too. We have nothing but rocks and roots so I wouldn't ride a HT around here. Many do but that's all personal preference.
    Pivot Firebird, Tomac Snyper, KTM 250SX

  4. #4
    neko no basu
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    Quote Originally Posted by topicstarter
    Hardtail vs full suspension for all mountain
    wrong question IMO.
    i'd rather say about hardtail and full suspension

    Quote Originally Posted by Luigiugueto
    DJ geometry sucks for pedalling. specially on long rides, it wont work.
    my hardtail is based on the scott voltage frame with dirt jumping geometry. i successfully did long rides (150—180 km) on it. the difference with random dirt jumping bike is frame size — medium instead of usual small. a bit harder to learn, but much more versatile.

    hardtail is excellent for learning to choose right path, especially on those technical sections.
    Last edited by cunnilinux; 06-07-2010 at 01:30 PM.
    GT force && scott voltage

  5. #5
    usually cranky
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    i agree, a hardtail will force you into good style and lines and once you have those skills down a fs is more fun and lets you push the envelope more imo.

  6. #6
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    easy, penis size is inversely correlated with amount of rear suspension

  7. #7
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    This has to be a trick question.....Do they even make hardtails anymore ??

    Seriously...go FS...you can always lock it out if you have to....

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    easy, penis size is inversely correlated with amount of rear suspension
    precisely. case in point: i don't even have a bike right now, and i can touch the dark side of the moon with my tip

    though i will be picking up a new trail bike in a few months, so it'll shrink back down to "normal" size

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by vyper005
    This has to be a trick question.....Do they even make hardtails anymore ??
    Nope, for the last few years the luddites have been buying fs frames and welding the back ends solid.

    Works a treat y'know.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by vyper005
    This has to be a trick question.....Do they even make hardtails anymore ??

    Seriously...go FS...you can always lock it out if you have to....
    Have you even tried a hardtail?

  11. #11
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Quote Originally Posted by vyper005
    This has to be a trick question.....Do they even make hardtails anymore ??

    Seriously...go FS...you can always lock it out if you have to....
    no offense...but you likely have no clue as to what a "Real" hardtail can bring. i used to sound like you but now? well now i found FS bikes boring. granted i ride like a girl but still

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsweet
    precisely. case in point: i don't even have a bike right now, and i can touch the dark side of the moon with my tip

    though i will be picking up a new trail bike in a few months, so it'll shrink back down to "normal" size

    More like if you have no travel you can touch the moon with your tip. No bike = no penis.

    just messing around with you man, cheers!

  13. #13
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    Dude, take a good piece of advise.

    Go for HT, until you get experience... and lots of experience.

    After that go with a FS, you will do miracles on it...and enjoy the ride..

  14. #14
    I AM I AM
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    HT, you get a better bike for the same money compared to buying FS.

    Really though it's rider preference. I started out on the old XC HT, I went to a decent XC dually but then I brought a HT for my husband and I really enjoyed the feel of HT again, feeling the ground under the back wheel and knowing what exactly the bike was doing, so as you're wanting to do now I went to a DJ HT for an all round ride to also get into a bit of DH. Then I got a DH dually and now I'm down to one bike, my DJ HT. So for the riding I do (or lack of it) a versatile hardtail is all I need. Now you might ride more than me your terrain might be rougher who knows. Start with a good HT, you will probably at some point want to go to FS (the grass is always greener as they say) but then you might go back to the HT. It's all good experience never the less.

    I think you're the best judge in which is better for you, get whichever you want the most otherwise just plan for a future addition to your stable, nothing wrong with having one of each!

  15. #15
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by vyper005

    Seriously...go FS...you can always lock it out if you have to....
    that isnt even close and im pretty sure doing that to try and acheive a hardtail feel is both bad for the frame and the shock.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    that isnt even close and im pretty sure doing that to try and acheive a hardtail feel is both bad for the frame and the shock.
    Full suspension frames aren't designed to withstand the forces hardtails are obviously because they have a shock. Sure you can place a tube replacing the shock so you have an unnecesarily complicated and heavy hardtail, but that contraption wont last a couple of weeks before it breaks.

  17. #17
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    For YEARS we just had HT's... And I'm still pedaling my [HT] '95 GT Zaskar. I also have a [FS] Diamond Back Mission 3. I will not let the HT go! I still ride it and if I was to only have one bike, I would have the GT Zaskar.

  18. #18
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    hmmm

    ive decided to with a chameleon, might not if they dont have black, my lbs has specialized and giant. i saw a couple santa cruz and asked if they can get me a chameleon since ive heard so much good things about that frame. they said they can get me the bike, kit and fork for 1300. pretty good i think. Then i saw a trance x for 1500 closeout sale reg price was 2000. if i get that bike i would hav to change stuff to make it all mountain and end up paying more in the end.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuietKaos
    ive decided to with a chameleon, .
    Good choice, that doesn't sound a bad price either.

    Give us a ride report when you've got some miles under it!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fix the Spade
    Good choice, that doesn't sound a bad price either.

    Give us a ride report when you've got some miles under it!
    the salesman at lbs gave me the price of a package deal for which i told him the same components as the stp2, so i dont know how that works since there two different companies. he told it to me via voicemail and hes off today for details.

  21. #21
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    i road an ironhorse yakuza chimpra (hardtail) with a marzocchi bomber forker (120mm travel) and some 2.4 tires for a little over 4 years before getting a full suspension.

    i road everything i could on my hardtail. riding a hardtail makes you a better rider, atleast in my opinion.

    i do however love my ironhorse 6point4, especially on awesome rooty or rocky downhills.
    my bike is my happy place

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuietKaos
    Let's discuss the pros and cons of each, which is better for type of all mountain and what not. I really want a dj bike setup as an all mountain hardtail 1x9. Any reason otherwise. Yes newbie and if this in another thread feel free to direct me to it.
    I think a fs is technically a more capable bike in most situations, but if the point is to enjoy the sport, then no one can tell you which you will enjoy more. Overall, I like some squish in the back for rough trails, especially with long DH sections, but a two of my good riding buddies have recently gone from FS AM bikes to AM hardtails, and they are having more fun, even if they are not as fast on the tech stuff. I do notice they are now faster on the smoother flat sections.

    Get what you want, but I do not go for the argument of getting a HT first because it makes you a better rider. You learn to ride what you have. Otherwise, everyone should start on 35 lb rigid ss bikes with cantilever brakes.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  23. #23
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    everyone should start on 35 lb rigid ss bikes with cantilever brakes.
    i agree

  24. #24
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    Learn it with HT, keep up your skill with HT, then "pick up the berries" with a proper FS.
    I reckon my Chameleon as a riding high school - always after a while with FS, it really gives a reality check! Getting lazy with FS is easy, and having a good balance of using both will keep you up to the challenge.

  25. #25
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    I ride a hardtail, but not because it does anything better than a FS bike. It's just a simple economic choice for me. When I got into the mountain bike riding, I couldn't afford the cost of an entry level for an FS bike, so I picked up a Diamondback HT.

    My best friend has a FS bike and rides the same trails I ride. The main pro of the FS bike is that he doesn't have to choose his pathways through the forest and mountains. I typically ride around roots, rocks and other obstacles while he just goes right over them without paying too much attention to how rough it is.

    The only cons I see is that my bike possibly seems to climb a little better, but it's a negligeable difference at best..........and my next bike will be a FS model.

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