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  1. #1
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    Hanging Bike From Dropper Post?

    I have a KIND SHOCK i900 dropper post and I have no other way to hang my bike on the work stand other than by the seat post. Is that going to cause problems? The bike weights 31lbs.

  2. #2
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    Are you referring to clamping/holding the bike by the post when it's extended? If so, I would first try and see if you could pull the post out just enough so that you'd be able to clamp it when the post isn't extended. This could be a pain doing it every time you put your bike in the stand, but I would think that clamping it while extended might lead to internal play of some sort.

    I've been thinking about this too as my next bike will have a dropper post and I hang it in the stand all the time.

  3. #3
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    Yeah, I'm talking about clamping on the part of the post that move up & down. I was going to hang it only with the post fully extended. I'm planning to put it in the stand for maintaince only.

  4. #4
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    At least for the Reverb they tell you not to clamp it by the shaft, but rather pull out enough to clamp it by the outside surface (as Dougie said).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    At least for the Reverb they tell you not to clamp it by the shaft, but rather pull out enough to clamp it by the outside surface (as Dougie said).
    I agree, I always clamp by the outside rather than the inside shaft. If you accidently bump the bike while in the stand you may risk damaging a seal or bending the inner shaft or something.

  6. #6
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    Yakima Top Tube for Droppers

    I had the same issue when I installed the CP Blacklite. I started thinking about making a custom bracket then saw one of these at my LBS and it works perfect. It even distributes the weight on the stand better than clamping to the seatpost. There are a few companies that make similar items, but I found the Yakima had the perfect tube diameter for the clamp and felt a little more sturdy than others I looked at.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    I had the same issue when I installed the CP Blacklite. I started thinking about making a custom bracket then saw one of these at my LBS and it works perfect. It even distributes the weight on the stand better than clamping to the seatpost. There are a few companies that make similar items, but I found the Yakima had the perfect tube diameter for the clamp and felt a little more sturdy than others I looked at.
    AWESOME!!! Thats what I need to do. Thats also the same frame I have. Do you have a part # for the Yakima?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by azmxr177 View Post
    AWESOME!!! Thats what I need to do. Thats also the same frame I have. Do you have a part # for the Yakima?
    Never mind on the part #, found one on Craigslist for $20. Thanks for your help.

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    That looks the tube for hanging odd shape frames on rear racks. Great use for it here.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    I had the same issue when I installed the CP Blacklite. I started thinking about making a custom bracket then saw one of these at my LBS and it works perfect. It even distributes the weight on the stand better than clamping to the seatpost. There are a few companies that make similar items, but I found the Yakima had the perfect tube diameter for the clamp and felt a little more sturdy than others I looked at.
    That's what I was gonna say... I did that with my Trance. those crossbars are really quite the neat gizmos!
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  11. #11
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    This could be a pain doing it every time you put your bike in the stand

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by fultoejame View Post
    This could be a pain doing it every time you put your bike in the stand
    Better than the pain of having to buy a new dropper post if you wreck it in the clamp though.
    I don't crash, I just have slightly uncontrolled dismounts!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fultoejame View Post
    This could be a pain doing it every time you put your bike in the stand
    I suppose some could find it a pain to put a bike in a rack every time they get done riding.
    Maybe I should just throw mine on the ground outside the door when I get home.
    That would be easy.

    BTW, doing it that way is probably easier than lining a seat tube up in a stand.

  14. #14
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    Its not bad for a quick tune up & clean up, but if I were to take the bike apart or do a major job I'd put my fixed seat post in and hold it that way. It also works good if you have multiple bikes with different seat post diameters.

  15. #15
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    Been dealing with this for the last 7 years since I got a Gravity Dropper.

    I clamp it on the top tube.

    I hesitate to recommend this to others, because you can screw up your top tube if you over tighten it, or if you clamp it in the wrong place, and on some bikes with highly formed/curved top tubes, there might not even be a safe place to clamp. Also not sure about CF, all these bike have been AL.

    I like the idea of using that Yakima thingy to go between the seat tube and the stem. I might look into that. I've been wanting one of those anyway for when I need to hang certain bikes on my car rack.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by azmxr177 View Post
    Its not bad for a quick tune up & clean up, but if I were to take the bike apart or do a major job I'd put my fixed seat post in and hold it that way. It also works good if you have multiple bikes with different seat post diameters.
    I just raise the dropper post in the frame and clamp onto its lower body, since I have a cable for a remote that makes it a pain to remove the post.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by fsrxc View Post
    I just raise the dropper post in the frame and clamp onto its lower body, since I have a cable for a remote that makes it a pain to remove the post.
    I use a few cheap seatposts for clamping bikes with dropper posts, if it's got a remote I still pull if out the seat tube and let it dangle over the back of the work stand, leaving the remote in place. Occasionally hold it (the dropper post) still with a couple of rubber bands.

    Never damaged a dropper post yet and it saves a whole load of hassle finding a new place to clamp to.

    Not sure what I'll do when the inevitable Reverb stealth comes into my hands...

  18. #18
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    I usually will never hang my bike by my reverb, especially if it's not fully extended.
    The best thing to do is open up the clamp on your bike stand and clamp it to the top tube!

  19. #19
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    Ive been clamping multiple ks post by the top tube for years with no issues. If the post can handle the loads put on it with my 210 lb ass on it day in and day out it can certainly handle the weight of the bike in the stand. Has anyone actually damaged their post by doing so or it it just a fear that it could damage it? I say as long as the clamp on your stand has a nice rubber surface that won't scratch the surface it's not an issue.

  20. #20
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    How about transporting to the trail using a trunk mount carrier that hangs the bike by the seatpost? Any problems with that if you make sure to have it fully extended before putting it up?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by pharcydemtnbiker View Post
    How about transporting to the trail using a trunk mount carrier that hangs the bike by the seatpost? Any problems with that if you make sure to have it fully extended before putting it up?
    I know the seatpost takes plenty of abuse while riding, but I prefer not having any extra stress on the post while transporting or working on it. A $30 Yakima bar is a hell of a lot cheaper than a new adjustable post so I error on the side of caution and use it.

  22. #22
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    I have my frame adaptor resting right under the seat unlike the seat clamp in the pic. It's basically lifting the bike by the rear seat. Do you think this would be okay?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sand wedge View Post
    I have my frame adaptor resting right under the seat unlike the seat clamp in the pic. It's basically lifting the bike by the rear seat. Do you think this would be okay?
    I would be a little hesitant to transport like that because of the upwards impact every time you hit a bump in the road. They are designed to take downward impact but I'm not sure of upward impact from the weight of the bike hanging and bouncing. Your call.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    I would be a little hesitant to transport like that because of the upwards impact every time you hit a bump in the road. They are designed to take downward impact but I'm not sure of upward impact from the weight of the bike hanging and bouncing. Your call.
    Not transporting it that way, using a Thule T2. Just hanging it on the wall when storing or on the repair stand.

    Hmm, will have to rethink this.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    I would be a little hesitant to transport like that because of the upwards impact every time you hit a bump in the road. They are designed to take downward impact but I'm not sure of upward impact from the weight of the bike hanging and bouncing. Your call.
    I've had a GD and Joplin 3 and now 2 Joplin 4's that I have been transporting
    with the adaptor type bars with no issues in 3+ years.
    I just make sure the posts are extended first and use bungee cords hooked to the hitch to keep the bike from swinging to much.
    Don't know anything about the other brands of seatposts though.
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  26. #26
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    So you're clamping the bar below the post clamp? Is that what you're saying?

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by pharcydemtnbiker View Post
    So you're clamping the bar below the post clamp? Is that what you're saying?
    If you are referring to my post, I hang the bike with the bike adaptor under the stem and seat unlike the picture of the bike in the work stand. I'd be afraid of the adaptor
    slipping past the seat clamp and the bike dropping it's weight on the seat.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    I had the same issue when I installed the CP Blacklite. I started thinking about making a custom bracket then saw one of these at my LBS and it works perfect. It even distributes the weight on the stand better than clamping to the seatpost. There are a few companies that make similar items, but I found the Yakima had the perfect tube diameter for the clamp and felt a little more sturdy than others I looked at.
    Just what I am looking for. Was having the same issues after fitting a dropper.

  29. #29
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    I'm bumping this thread to get some more ideas on the best way to mount a bike in a stand with a dropper.
    I've got a stealth so I can't remove it to use a dummy post. I've got a carbon frame so I'm hesitant to clamp the frame.

    I took it to a shop and they said to lightly clamp the top (inner) part of the post so that the bike is basically hanging with the weight pulling up on the saddle.

    I've also heard to clamp the lower part of the post but the guy at the shop said to never do that.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    I'm bumping this thread to get some more ideas on the best way to mount a bike in a stand with a dropper.
    I've got a stealth so I can't remove it to use a dummy post. I've got a carbon frame so I'm hesitant to clamp the frame.

    I took it to a shop and they said to lightly clamp the top (inner) part of the post so that the bike is basically hanging with the weight pulling up on the saddle.

    I've also heard to clamp the lower part of the post but the guy at the shop said to never do that.
    Well, if the post option is out and the frame is a no-go, then I don't see a whole lot of other options. What is it about the top tube extender that doesn't work for you? I've been using my for a few years now and works perfect.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    Well, if the post option is out and the frame is a no-go, then I don't see a whole lot of other options. What is it about the top tube extender that doesn't work for you? I've been using my for a few years now and works perfect.
    The top tube extender is definitely an option, except I don't have one (yet).
    I was also wondering how that helps, since you have to clamp the extender on to the frame or the post also, right?

    I guess the question is if it is ok to clamp to the top of the dropper, or the bottom, or both, or neither, before I go out and buy an extender. They aren't expensive, but I've already got a lot of clutter in my garage.

  32. #32
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    Just don't hang the bike without the dropper fully extended. Hang it from the upper portion, if its stealth or ks. If it's an older reverb, you need to pull some post out of the frame, and clamp to the lower portion. It is designed to take clamping forces, as its where you tighten the seat clamp. Don't clamp the seal head portion, you can deform it.
    It goes without saying, don't over tighten the stand clamp. Again, do not over tighten the stand clamp. I have seen way too many people thing the clamp needs your whole body weight to close. (Park).

  33. #33
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    Steve

    for routine cleanup and maintenance (drivetrain lube etc) - i slide the nose of my saddle in to "jaws" of my bike stand - do my work and done - basically the front wheel is on the ground - and i can lift/spin it as necessary to clean rotor etc...

    not "optimal" if you plan to get into major stuff - but works well for me as a simpleton garage mech.

    when I take my bike to shop - they usually hang it from stand by nose of saddle... have not clamped to dropper post or tubes - again - this has been for more "routine" needs -

    i've used my bike rack top tube adapter a couple of times - but found for what Im doing hanging by saddle nose works just fine

    i will not transport my bike using the adapter/old rack - its been laying down in back of 4runner... which is limiting etc... unless Im solo to the trailhead

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    The top tube extender is definitely an option, except I don't have one (yet).
    I was also wondering how that helps, since you have to clamp the extender on to the frame or the post also, right?

    I guess the question is if it is ok to clamp to the top of the dropper, or the bottom, or both, or neither, before I go out and buy an extender. They aren't expensive, but I've already got a lot of clutter in my garage.
    I have a Yakima tube top that I use to hang my bike both from the rack on the spare tire of my Jeep, and my work stand.

    I'm not a big fan of having it rub on the stanchion of my KS Lev dropper post, or having the saddle rest on it--Seems like that would lead to problems with the post.

    Fortunately, the textured 'knob' where the stanchion goes into the rest of the seat post is just big enough that the tube top catches on it, and supports the weight of the bike. It has worked great for me for over a year, the only time I take the tube top off the bike is when I'm riding it. It's also nice, because it keeps the front wheel aligned when in the stand.

  35. #35
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    I just bought a Park PCS 10 from Peak bikes in Golden, and asked them how they clamp bikes with droppers. They (the one guy I asked) recommended clamping the bottom part of the dropper.
    Thinking about it, during riding, the seat tube clamp has to put a lot of force on the bottom of the post to be able to hold my weight without slipping, so clamping it with those big rubbery jaws just enough to hold the bike weight should not be risky.
    Last edited by smilinsteve; 07-30-2014 at 11:31 AM.

  36. #36
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    When I rode demo bikes from the SRAM Ride Experience (the bikes were supplied by SRAM to demo Pikes, Reverbs, and XX1 drivetrains), the SRAM mechanics hung the bikes on the sawhorse-style bike stands by the saddle with the dropper posts fully extended.

    They said that upward loads were safe with a fully extended post, which makes sense given that the inner tube is flanged and that the load is therefore borne by a solid mechanical interface rather than the cartridge.

    Using a clamping repair stand only adds the potential to scratch or crush the stanchion, which can be avoided with a padded clamp and light pressure.

  37. #37
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    I have no idea how I didn't see the picture posted by RDMTB-rider when I posted a few weeks ago.

    That is my exact set up with the tube top, works flawlessly.

    @smilinsteve-- I don't have enough of the bottom 1/2 of my dropper post exposed to be able to clamp to it. If I didn't have the tube top, I'd have to clamp my frame.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by amxc View Post
    When I rode demo bikes from the SRAM Ride Experience (the bikes were supplied by SRAM to demo Pikes, Reverbs, and XX1 drivetrains), the SRAM mechanics hung the bikes on the sawhorse-style bike stands by the saddle with the dropper posts fully extended.

    They said that upward loads were safe with a fully extended post, which makes sense given that the inner tube is flanged and that the load is therefore borne by a solid mechanical interface rather than the cartridge.

    Using a clamping repair stand only adds the potential to scratch or crush the stanchion, which can be avoided with a padded clamp and light pressure.
    Now I've had one shop tell me to clamp the top part lightly with the post extended, and another shop tell me to clamp the bottom part. Probably both are ok if you are reasonably careful. I think I'm leaning toward using the bottom, as it is meant to be clamped anyway, and you don't risk scratching the coating on the sliding part, as you mentioned.

    This is probably fine if you are just talking about keeping the seat post vertical in the stand, but if you start spinning the bike in the stand so that you are putting bending loads on the post, then I don't know if either of those methods are ok?

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by GR1822 View Post

    @smilinsteve-- I don't have enough of the bottom 1/2 of my dropper post exposed to be able to clamp to it. If I didn't have the tube top, I'd have to clamp my frame.
    Neither do I, but I just pull it out enough to clamp it. If I didn't have a stealth dropper, I'd remove it completely and replace it with a dummy post to clamp on to.

  40. #40
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    So basically seems like the options are:
    - Get a dummy post, remove dropper, insert dummy and clamp to it
    - Hang from saddle (or as one guy said, clamp the noise of the saddle)
    - Clamp to frame or get a hanger like the top tube extenders

  41. #41
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    This is where I hang mine:
    Hanging Bike From Dropper Post?-hang.jpg
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    So basically seems like the options are:
    - Get a dummy post, remove dropper, insert dummy and clamp to it
    - Hang from saddle (or as one guy said, clamp the noise of the saddle)
    - Clamp to frame or get a hanger like the top tube extenders
    Or clamp bottom of post
    Or clamp top of post lightly (similar to hanging from saddle).

  43. #43
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    I've always thought the 'official' recommendation was to clamp the lower portion of the post. If you don't have enough post exposed... loosen the seat clamp and pull it out a bit. That's what I do, though it is annoying to loosen the seat clamp and adjust every time I want to work on the bike.

    That said, I've seen 'pros' (and by pros I mean the company guys at the demo trucks) just clamp the upper/stanchion part (out of convenience?). But those bikes get beat on so if a post breaks, it's probably no big deal.

  44. #44
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    My lbs always clamps the sliding part of my seatpost into the stand. I grimace every time they do it, just doesn't seem ideal. It's really not that hard to loosen the clamp and slide the entire thing out a couple inches, they're just being lazy. This is part of the reason I've been doing more work myself.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skelldify View Post
    My lbs always clamps the sliding part of my seatpost into the stand. I grimace every time they do it, just doesn't seem ideal. It's really not that hard to loosen the clamp and slide the entire thing out a couple inches, they're just being lazy. This is part of the reason I've been doing more work myself.
    There is nothing wrong with clamping the stanchion of the post, unless its a Reverb and they crush the hose and fitting. The stanchion is hard anodized. The clamp will not hurt the post unless some one really over clamps it.
    Do not hang or pick up your bike without the post being fully extened. Do not store your post in the lower position for long periods of time, especially in a hot car.
    It can/will lead to the need for a service as it tends to force air past the ifp.

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