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  1. #1
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    Gary Fisher Roscoe 2 vs Yeti 575 Enduro...Pros and Cons. Need advice please!

    Considering these 2 bikes for a new rig. Please give me some advice on the pros and cons of the component packages. Both bikes are around $3500.

    Gary Fisher Roscoe 2 Build
    Roscoe II
    Frame
    6011 hydroformed butted aluminum mainframe & chainstays, TopSwing magnesium link, semi-integrated internally relieved E2 1-1/8"-1-1/2" HT design, cold-forged dropouts, G2 Geometry
    Fork
    Fox Talas 140RL, 140mm-120mm-100mm adjustable travel, E2 tapered 1-1/8"-1-1/2" alloy steerer, custom G2 offset
    Rear Shock
    Custom Fox Float RP2 with Dual Rate Control Valve (DRCV) technology, w/air pressure, 2-position Pro Pedal, & external Rebound
    Headset
    Cane Creek Frustum E2 1-1/8"-1-1/2", semi-integrated, cartridge bearings
    Pedals
    Custom Crank Bros Candy w/cleats
    Front Derailleur
    Shimano SLX, down swing
    Rear Derailleur
    Shimano XT M772 Shadow SGS
    Shifters
    Shimano SLX, Rapidfire Plus
    Cassette
    SRAM PG970 11-34T, 9spd
    Handlebar
    Bontrager Race Lite OS Riser, 40mm rise, 690mm width, 7d backsweep, 4d upsweep, 31.8mm
    Stem
    Bontrager Race X Lite OS, 7d rise, 31.8mm
    Saddle
    Bontrager Rhythm, hollow cromoly rails
    Seatpost
    Bontrager King Earl, 3D forged internally ovalized 7075 alloy shaft, two-bolt rocker head
    Wheels
    Bontrager Rhythm Comp w/QR15 thru-axle front hub, 28mm tubeless ready* rims
    Tires
    Bontrager XDX, 26x2.4 (60/59), 120 TPI, tubeless ready, aramid folding bead
    Brakeset
    Avid Elixir R, hydraulic disc, integrated reservoir w/tools-free reach adjust, 185mm front/160mm rear G2 Clean Sweep 6-bolt rotors
    Crank Set
    Shimano SLX, 44/32/22, Hollowtech II arms, integrated BB spindle

    Yeti 575 Enduro Build
    COMPONENT SPECIFICATIONS

    * Fox F100RLC suspension fork
    * Fox RP23 rear shock
    * Cane Creek S3 headset
    * Shimano SLX 22/32/44 Hollowtech II crankset/BB
    * Shimano XT front derailleur
    * Shimano XT (shadow type) rear derailleur
    * Shimano SLX Rapidfire trigger shifters with OGD
    * Shimano SLX 11-34 cassette
    * Mavic Crossride wheelset
    * Maxxis Crossmark 2.1 tire with presta tubes
    * Shimano SLX hydraulic disc brake calipers/levers/rotors
    * Easton Monkeylite handlebar
    * Thomson X4 stem
    * ODI Hardcore grips
    * SDG Ti Fly saddle
    * Thomson Elite seatpost

    Thanks for any advice!

  2. #2
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    Only concern is with the weird Fisher geometry. I'm sure it works fine--but say you want to upgrade to a 160mm fork or the next generation fork in the future, too bad, because you need the special offset. Even if you can find one with the special offset, the chance of getting a sweet deal is essentially zero because there are so few made.

    Additionally, the resale value of the Yeti will probably be higher. I think most would rather pay more for a used Yeti than a GF. I know GF has a longer warranty, but the Yeti is five years which is probably the longest of all the elite brands.

    These are deal breakers in my book.

  3. #3
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    Yeti 575 Enduro Build
    COMPONENT SPECIFICATIONS

    * Fox F100RLC suspension fork
    This is a typo, right?

    I know you posted this on the Yeti forum and didn't get much feedback. If most people are like me they don't even know what a Roscoe looks like, sorry. I can say the 575 is one sweet bike you can use for xc or build up heavier and slacken the geometry out with a 160mm fork and still climb rocks like goat. (but I am a 575 two time owner, what else would you expect me to say? haha)

  4. #4
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    It'll come down to which fits you better, in all honesty.

    Yes the Fisher has the G2 geometry which limits the number of fork choices if you want to keep the full genesis version 2 geo...but if you throw a longer fork on either bike, it'll change the way the bike rides. Even if you just update the fork at the same length, you still have genesis geometry of the frame, but it is just the regular (G1) version like on the hardtails or my Cake...all you lose it the custom offset on the fork.

    Depending on where you live, service could also be an issue. I've got several Fisher/Trek dealers locally....but only 1 LBS who will bring in a Yeti on special order and doesn't typically stock parts. If I had gone Yeti and had an issue, it'd be a while (say a 4 days to a week) before I was riding again.

    If you've got the option, ride 'em both. I personally liked the longer top tube of the Fisher, so that's what I'm riding, but YMMV. The spec sheet only tells you so much.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

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  5. #5
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    One is build by a giant faceless conglomerate, another is a Yeti.

    Proprietory parts are lame. Many in-house brands are lame too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho Mike
    If I had gone Yeti and had an issue, it'd be a while (say a 4 days to a week) before I was riding again.
    What kind of an issue? If it is a broken frame, you store is unlikely to stock it. It recently took me several weeks and several trips to a store to get a replacement piece for a Giant's kid's trailer bike, for example. And that was supposed to be a good store. It probably is. Guys there had been nice and helpful, but ordering parts directly would have been probably faster.

    Compare that to funding a replacement for some broken component in your garage and fixing it in less time that it takes to get to a store. And ordering a new one online for half the LBS price after that in a few minutes.

    I have been riding Yeti Kokopelli for a few years, bought in a dealer ready box. All I ever needed was to order a bushings/bearings rebuild kit once from Yeti directly, came in in two days, and plop it in in half an hour. If I ever bust rear triangle, I can do the same. Yeti are very helpful, and they have good manuals for service.



    So my vote is for 575.
    Last edited by Broccoli; 03-15-2009 at 12:58 PM.

  6. #6
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    My 2 cents.............

    1. No experience with the Yeti.... however I hear the 575 is a great bike and would be my pick

    2. Went to the bike shop yesterday and saw one of those roscoe's while collecting some tools. First impression is that this thing looks burly. However being that it has such a short travel fork I wonder its designed purpose. More like an xc bike for a guy who is probably not going to race? Since you posted this in the AM forum is why im wondering what your intensions are? As far as bling goes this bike has it going on. Also it wasnt anywhere near 3500. Sticker on it was $2400 - $2600 from what I can remember but I dont know if they have different levels of roscoe or not. Call around and maybe have a bike shop ship it to you and save some money. I saved about 1000 dollars having my remedy shipped to me.
    Trek Fuel EX8
    Full XT cockpit
    Thompson X4 Elite Stem
    Easton Haven Carbon Handlebars / Seatpost

  7. #7
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    Yes the Fisher has the G2 geometry which limits the number of fork choices if you want to keep the full genesis version 2 geo...but if you throw a longer fork on either bike, it'll change the way the bike rides. Even if you just update the fork at the same length, you still have genesis geometry of the frame, but it is just the regular (G1) version like on the hardtails or my Cake...all you lose it the custom offset on the fork.
    Well... if you lose the custom offset of the fork then wouldn't you lose half of what makes that bike special?

    Also, while it is true that a longer travel fork would change the way either bike rides, the 575 is designed to be run with either a 140mm or a 160mm fork. I'm pretty sure the Roscoe is not designed for anything more then 140mm.

    Anyways... like a lot of the others, I've never ridden the Roscoe, but I have a 575 and am amazingly impressed with it. I've ridden and raced it both xc and dh... taken it hill climbing and 24 hour races, but have still hit 6 ft drops to little transition with no problems at all. Highly recommended!

  8. #8
    M_S
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    Are you sure you typed the right fork in the Yeti specs?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by M_S
    Are you sure you typed the right fork in the Yeti specs?
    It has to be a typo. The build kits include a 140mm fork. It would be darn near unridable with a F100.

  10. #10
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    I must say the Yeti riders sure show solidarity Nice to see that sort of brand loyalty

    I do ride a GF Cake...which is basically the forerunner to the Roscoe...though it doesn't have the G2 fork. In other words, I'm riding an approximate Roscoe without the special offset. Not quite as nice steering, but that's really about it.

    For what I have locally....or even in the province (I'm up here in the Great White North, eh)...I'd need to be internet buying stuff if I had gone for something like a Yeti. Simple fact of the matter *here* is that they don't have the market share for the parts to be readily available otherwise. Take something as simple as a toasted derailleur hanger...I'd be twiddling my thumbs for a week or doubling the price to get even something as simple as a der. hanger in short order here. Granted, YMMV as Yeti has better representation elsewhere. That's just the way markets vary from place to place.

    Now before you go slamming me for being pro-GF or anti-Yeti, I'm just calling it as I see it locally: my next frame will likely be a Knolly.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho Mike
    Take something as simple as a toasted derailleur hanger...I'd be twiddling my thumbs for a week or doubling the price to get even something as simple as a der. hanger in short order here.
    Buy a spare. For any other parts you will wait longer if ordering through a store. If anything, it will be harder to get a non-standard fork - are you even sure Fox will be making them in a few years?

  12. #12
    offroader
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    yeti yeti yeti yeti yeti yeti yeti yeti yeti yeti yeti yeti

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    sickem' flash!!!! coo coo coo coo...

  14. #14
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    I've owned both!!! Verdict: Roscoe

    I've owned both -- the Yeti 575 and a Roscoe III. I actually sold my 575 to by the Roscoe because I fell in love with the latter bike. I had a top of the line XTR build on the Yeti and it was a great bike but had three things that bothered me (all of which the Roscoe specifically resolves!). <br>First, the single pivot suspension leaves a lot to be desired in the beginning and end of the stroke. Acceleration was poor because I'd sink into the suspension when I accelerated hard, and on drop the suspension ramps up really hard at the end and doesn't feel good. The bike performed great while in the middle part of the stroke, but for more aggressive riding it disappointed me. Second, the suspension firms up under brake force. Last, it's not a stiff as the Roscoe.<br>The Roscoe is downright amazing -- honestly. Quality travel over longer travel any day. The rear suspension feels bottomless and beautifully supple. The fork is fantastic, won't ever be woefully outdated, and balances perfectly with the bike -- yes you can put a 160mm fork on the Yeti, but it rakes out the angles too much and only intensifies the issues with the rear suspension. The ABP on the Roscoe keeps the rear suspension active at all times, even under hard braking. And the stiffness of the Roscoe is awesome, making it more stable on downhills and corner significantly better. Don't get me wrong, the Yeti 575 is a great bike and I loved it. It's just that the Roscoe better, which says a lot about the Roscoe.
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  15. #15
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    I love my 575 a lot. It climbs great and is a very versitle bike. I enjoy every ride on her. The bike eat up the rough stuff very well. I haven't found a weakness to my 575....

  16. #16
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    Yeti 575

    I have a Yeti 575 and it is awesome. First of all the carbon rear end is very stiff. I was also very impressed how well the bike climbed. Once you get to the top of the climb it can totally handle the downhills with ease. The Roscoe is a good choice and quite a bit cheaper than the 575.

  17. #17
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    I've owned both -- the Yeti 575 and a Roscoe III. I actually sold my 575 to by the Roscoe because I fell in love with the latter bike. I had a top of the line XTR build on the Yeti and it was a great bike but had three things that bothered me (all of which the Roscoe specifically resolves!).
    First, the single pivot suspension leaves a lot to be desired in the beginning and end of the stroke. Acceleration was poor because I'd sink into the suspension when I accelerated hard, and on drop the suspension ramps up really hard at the end and doesn't feel good. The bike performed great while in the middle part of the stroke, but for more aggressive riding it disappointed me. Second, the suspension firms up under brake force. Last, it's not a stiff as the Roscoe.
    The Roscoe is downright amazing -- honestly. Quality travel over longer travel any day. The rear suspension feels bottomless and beautifully supple. The fork is fantastic, won't ever be woefully outdated, and balances perfectly with the bike -- yes you can put a 160mm fork on the Yeti, but it rakes out the angles too much and only intensifies the issues with the rear suspension. The ABP on the Roscoe keeps the rear suspension active at all times, even under hard braking. And the stiffness of the Roscoe is awesome, making it more stable on downhills and corner significantly better. Don't get me wrong, the Yeti 575 is a great bike and I loved it. It's just that the Roscoe better, which says a lot about the Roscoe.
    I have never heard of or experienced any of those issues. Not discounting your opinion or anything, but there's quite a lot of reviews and mine and others personal experience that says the opposite. I don't do much out of the saddle hammering uphill... so perhaps that's when you are experiencing the acceleration lag... but I moved straight from a 23lb Turner XC race bike to my 575 and I never noticed any loss of efficiency.

    Same for the landing off drops. Perhaps your suspension was set up too soft or something.... but I've landed 5-6 ft drops to little transition or flat and never had any issue. It lands almost as nicely as my Sunday. And that has 8'' of travel.

    Suspension stiffing under braking? Definitely never noticed that. Nor has any of the many reviews of the bike (that I have read at least)

    As for the 160mm fork raking out the bike too much, that is flat out wrong. The bike is specifically designed for a 160mm fork. It might be too slack and raked out for you... but a 67degree HA and a 44.5 inch wheelbase is pretty darn slacked out. You might not like the way it feels, but those numbers are pretty standard among 6-7 inch travel, aggressive bikes.

    Sorry if I'm coming off a bit as a Yeti fanboy... I've just never noticed any of the issues that droman brought up. Definitely test out both bikes... as I'm sure you can see, different people like vastly different things. Our opinions are great, but there's nothing like actually riding the bikes yourself.
    IMO: it's really no contest. The Roscoe is for sure, a sweet bike, but the 575 climbs like a much much smaller bike (travel-wise) and is sweet enough on the DH side of things that I usually pick it over my Iron Horse Sunday DH bike for shuttle runs.
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  18. #18
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    I'd get the Yeti and slap on a 160mm fork. Would make for a killer ride.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monk_Knight
    . I've just never noticed any of the issues that droman brought up. Definitely test out both bikes... as I'm sure you can see, different people like vastly different things. Our opinions are great, but there's nothing like actually riding the bikes yourself.
    IMO: it's really no contest. The Roscoe is for sure, a sweet bike, but the 575 climbs like a much much smaller bike (travel-wise) and is sweet enough on the DH side of things that I usually pick it over my Iron Horse Sunday DH bike for shuttle runs.
    +1. One other thing is that we should not condone proprietary components, fork and shock in particular.

  20. #20
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    Yeti FTW.

  21. #21
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    Interesting, since I'm leaning towards the 09 roscoe II

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by meph
    Only concern is with the weird Fisher geometry. I'm sure it works fine--but say you want to upgrade to a 160mm fork or the next generation fork in the future, too bad, because you need the special offset. Even if you can find one with the special offset, the chance of getting a sweet deal is essentially zero because there are so few made.
    Nothing personal but that's a load of crap.

    You don't need the special offset at all. It doesn't apply to the steerer, which is a pretty normal now tapered affair. It doesn't even affect the geometry as the Roscoe's head angle is a very normal 68.

    With a normal offset fork a Roscoe will go round corners just like any other bike with a 68 degree head angle.

    On paper the Roscoe is better value, you get better wheels and everything else is roughly equivalent. You also get lifetime warranty on the frame.
    However, it's handling really divides people, it steers very quickly for an AM bike. So try one before commiting to it. If you like the bike but not the fork you could always get a shop swap on the it, but that would add cost.

    Both are linkage driven single pivots, so ignore most of the abp better than single pivots marketing rubbish because it is one. It does have a noticeable effect, but it's not some magic cure-all like the adverts say.
    IMO the Yeti has the 'right name' but little else in it's favour.

    Get a test ride on both, most decent shops will arrange a demo, go for the one you prefer, simples.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monk_Knight
    I have never heard of or experienced any of those issues. Not discounting your opinion or anything, but there's quite a lot of reviews and mine and others personal experience that says the opposite. I don't do much out of the saddle hammering uphill... so perhaps that's when you are experiencing the acceleration lag... but I moved straight from a 23lb Turner XC race bike to my 575 and I never noticed any loss of efficiency.

    Same for the landing off drops. Perhaps your suspension was set up too soft or something.... but I've landed 5-6 ft drops to little transition or flat and never had any issue. It lands almost as nicely as my Sunday. And that has 8'' of travel.

    Suspension stiffing under braking? Definitely never noticed that. Nor has any of the many reviews of the bike (that I have read at least)

    As for the 160mm fork raking out the bike too much, that is flat out wrong. The bike is specifically designed for a 160mm fork. It might be too slack and raked out for you... but a 67degree HA and a 44.5 inch wheelbase is pretty darn slacked out. You might not like the way it feels, but those numbers are pretty standard among 6-7 inch travel, aggressive bikes.

    Sorry if I'm coming off a bit as a Yeti fanboy... I've just never noticed any of the issues that droman brought up. Definitely test out both bikes... as I'm sure you can see, different people like vastly different things. Our opinions are great, but there's nothing like actually riding the bikes yourself.
    IMO: it's really no contest. The Roscoe is for sure, a sweet bike, but the 575 climbs like a much much smaller bike (travel-wise) and is sweet enough on the DH side of things that I usually pick it over my Iron Horse Sunday DH bike for shuttle runs.
    Gotta agree with Monk here. After really riding mine for a few weeks I've NEVER seen anything like the other guy posted.
    Maybe his suspension wasn't setup right? that's my guess. It takes some time to dial it in, but afterward its supple when you need it, and stiff when you need climbing power.

    Also not sure what he was talking about regarding its being raked out w/ a 160. The 575 was designed around a 150-160 fork, so any issues you have with that are likely your own.

  24. #24
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    575 with a Lyrik or 36...

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    575 with a Lyrik or 36...

    mmmmm....yummy. Good for everything.
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    The Roscoe is actually one of the best bikes I've ridden. Ripping and fun, light but stiff. Tested it a while back for a swedish mtb mag, here's the article (check the pics or use google translate). It's now my favourite AM bike together with the Prophet. That DRCV shock is amazing!
    http://happymtb.org/2009/05/22/rosco...om-alla-andra/

    There's a video inside with some riding and shots of the linkage working with and without applied rear brake and so on.
    Swedish trail/AM/Enduro/DH-rider - Currently rides Spitfire V2 & Devinci Wilson SL. Spending the summer 2013 in Whistler, BC.

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    Get the Yeti !!! !!! !!!

    1. If you change your mind later, you get a higher resale price. I had a Fisher Hifi which I resold, and I only got about 60% back after 3 months =[ of use! You can get an easy 85% return on a good condition yeti.

    2. If you get a Roscoe, I hope you like Bontrager components. You'll get a Bontrager seatpost, saddle, bars, grips, stem, wheelset, and tires (someone correct me if I'm wrong). Most people end up changing these parts out eventually.

    3. If you decide against the Yeti, look at the Turner 5spot or Santa Cruz Nomad! DW-link or VPP FTW!!!

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    Just a follow up because I think some people thought I was knocking the 575 in my analysis, which I certainly didn't intend to do. The 575 is an awesome bike and I really loved it, and the slight drawbacks I found with it (and every bike has drawbacks, including the Roscoe) weren't ones I that identified in full until riding the bikes side-by-side. And unless you have a chance to ride them in a proper comparison, it's hard to find fault with the Yeti because it is such a sweet rig.

    Just want to respond to some of the subsequent comments made. A single pivot suspension design is what it is (like on the Yeti), and it has some universally acknowledged issues, including brake jack, which makes the suspension less active under hard braking. Also, I dialed in the rear shock's PSI after much experimentation, so it wasn't set too soft. But an important distinction is that I'm talking about a Yeti with an RP23 not a DHX Air 5. Another universally acknowledged fact is that the RP23 (regular canister size) has a drastic ramp up at the end of the stroke especially in long travel trail bike applications. So, the fact that the Yeti was bottoming out hard is more an issue with the shock than the bike's design. I'd highly recommend the DHX Air (which I had on my Enduro previously), because you can tweak beginning-, mid-, and end-stroke performance. If I lowered the shock's PSI to make the end stroke smoother, there'd be too much sag and a loss of acceleration (with the ProPedal off!).

    Oh, and I fully agree that running a 160mm fork still leaves the headtube angle and wheel base in a reasonable range on paper. But on the bike, the higher fork shifts the rider weight further back, which, based on the location of the pivots and linkage, makes for a good deal more squat in the suspension. This is great for aggressive trail riding and/or light downhill, and in that case I'd expect you'd be running a DHX Air in rear to adjust for this. For anything less than this type of riding, it makes the bike feel a bit less efficient and less well-balanced than when running a 140mm fork. Again, a 160mm fork makes the bike into a different beast, which might be exactly what you want. Plus, you could get a Fox 36 Talas, and click the travel down one setting to 130mm to balance it out more during more varied trail riding. I just feel that the Roscoe handles it all beautifully as is.

    One last thing re: the proprietary argument. The shock and fork really aren't proprietary, like, say, the I-Beam saddles/seatposts. The fork does have a slightly different offset than normal, but if you want a different fork it'll work just fine; it'll just change the handling somewhat. As for the shock, it was developed by Trek and Fox, so they won't just let anyone have something they invested in jointly. The shock is now on the 2010 Fuel EX and Remedy, as well. And, in actuality, most companies work with Fox to custom valve the shocks for each of their bikes' spring rates and leverage ratios, so in essence every OEM Fox shock is "proprietary." Fox specifically advise you not to swap their OEM shocks for this reason. You could also totally use a DRCV shock on another bike -- you just get into the custom valving issue like with any regular RP23.

    Glad to see this healthy and productive discussion going on. It really helps future buyers with getting all the information and knowing what to expect. As always, there's NO substitute for riding them both, then weighing the pros and cons of each depending on your intended use.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by droman
    A single pivot suspension design is what it is (like on the Yeti), and it has some universally acknowledged issues, including brake jack.
    I do not acknowledge that as an issue. It brakes just fine. Just do not pay attention to minute details and enjoy your ride. You are over analyzing. If you like Roscoe more, that's fine, no need to justify it with long words.

    160mm fork does not shift you anywhere. Stem, handlebar sweep, seatpost setback and saddle position have a far greater effect.

    Fork and shock on Roscoe are proprietary, no way around it.

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    get the yeti

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    I do not acknowledge that as an issue. It brakes just fine. Just do not pay attention to minute details and enjoy your ride. You are over analyzing. If you like Roscoe more, that's fine, no need to justify it with long words.

    160mm fork does not shift you anywhere. Stem, handlebar sweep, seatpost setback and saddle position have a far greater effect.

    Fork and shock on Roscoe are proprietary, no way around it.

    Remember that the original poster is asking for a comparison between these two bikes, and Droman is one of the few posters that has had experience on both of them.
    What he is describing is his analysis of the differences in the way the bikes perform, and I don't think that you could possibly "over analyze" as all information is useful to the original poster.

    I think you will find a 160mm travel fork [I]does[I] shift your weight, in fact, it will shift your weight back on the bike as it lifts the headtube higher than what a 140mm travel fork would.
    This also increases the wheelbase and what's called the 'front centre' of the bike, which is the distance between the fork axle and the BB.
    I don't have any useful images to upload, but if you would like a further explanation of what this does Curmy, please PM me.

    Also, because the rear brake is attached to the chainstay that rotates on the same swing arc as the main pivot, the Yeti will inevitably have brake jack, there is no denying it.
    Whether that makes a difference is up to the rider, and understandably Curmy, it doesn't bother you, but there are plenty of riders who do not appreciate that particular ride 'characteristic'.
    There is plenty of literature on the technical aspects of brake jack if you wish to read into it, however, it can be one of those things that until you ride an ABP bike, then it may not really be an issue.

    On the "proprietary" issue, certainly standardization is the way to go but I don't think it should be the be all and end all. Does the proprietary issue still apply to Cannondale's Lefty forks? Or BB30 frames? Or 15mm fork axles?
    Sure standards are great, but if there is an option that works more optimally for the given situation, such as the G2 fork and the DRCV shock, should consumers avoid it just because it's different?

    I will chime in here with my experience where we recently had to order a set of G2 uppers for a customer who had scored the stanchions on his Roscoe 3. Took us 3 weeks to order from the states (we're in Aus).
    So if anyone is asking, Fox do make them and they are available for Fisher customers.

    If you are going to pursue the "proprietary" issue, please add some personal experience that you have had or know of, otherwise speculation gets us nowhere.

    Of course you could not "pay attention and just enjoy the ride" but I'm sure that oceanminded wishes to spend his/her $3500 as effectively as possible, and the "minute details" are probably what seperates these two bikes.

    I won't comment on the the differences between these two bikes because I haven't had expensive time on either.
    I do like the Roscoe, though I think you will find there are fanboys of each brand and there will be a certain amount of 'opinions' going around that may not be completely objective.

    Given these two bikes are similar in price, quality and geometry, I really think that oceanminded will need to test ride both, as they will appeal to different riders.
    The Yeti is very very popular and is for a reason, it is a quality bike with great geometry and suits riders wanting a bike/brand that is a bit different from the mass-produced stuff.

    P.S. Apologies for the lengthy response, but it bothers me when subjective opinions are put forward so strongly. Please appreciate that there are other opinions out there and just because you ride one bike, doesn't necessarily make it the best bike out there for everyone else.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Willy
    Also, because the rear brake is attached to the chainstay that rotates on the same swing arc as the main pivot, the Yeti will inevitably have brake jack, there is no denying it.
    So have you actually ridden a 575 and compared it to the ABP bikes and noticed brake jack differences?

    Anyway, AFAIK it would not actually "jack" but squat. Such a behavior can actually be beneficial if you consider that this could help counteract the forward weight shift you will get under braking. All susp. bikes will be affected by weight shift. And all bikes will feel rougher before corners due to the braking bumps that develop on heavily used trails in the places where people are braking a lot.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigen
    So have you actually ridden a 575 and compared it to the ABP bikes and noticed brake jack differences?

    Anyway, AFAIK it would not actually "jack" but squat. Such a behavior can actually be beneficial if you consider that this could help counteract the forward weight shift you will get under braking. All susp. bikes will be affected by weight shift. And all bikes will feel rougher before corners due to the braking bumps that develop on heavily used trails in the places where people are braking a lot.
    :

    The brake squat does happen on the Yeti. You can debate the nuances of bikes all day long and get nowhere, unless you are just regurgitating stuff you have read about xxx bike. Brake squat has been deemed as undesirable by companies making other designs but everything has it's pros and cons. I love the way it holds me in the cockpit when decending the chunky stuff...it also makes the rear end harsher when descending stutter bumps at speed (when on the rear brake). It's all good though, you learn to ride your bike in the manner that best suits you and the ride you have.

    I think I could safely bet a paycheck that droman has never owned a 575.

    universally acknowledged issues, including brake jack
    Sounds like a magazine quote, lol.

    OP: You gotta ride both and decide. If you can't do that then do what most of us end up doing and go with the bike that draws you in. Whether that's b/c it's sexy, you love the colors or you love the name or whatever....just go with the one you stay up at night thinking about. If neither bike is calling your name then open up your options a bit.
    Last edited by eatdrinkride; 09-25-2009 at 12:56 AM.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigen
    So have you actually ridden a 575 and compared it to the ABP bikes and noticed brake jack differences?

    Anyway, AFAIK it would not actually "jack" but squat. Such a behavior can actually be beneficial if you consider that this could help counteract the forward weight shift you will get under braking. All susp. bikes will be affected by weight shift. And all bikes will feel rougher before corners due to the braking bumps that develop on heavily used trails in the places where people are braking a lot.
    No I have not, and apologies for the confusion Tigen, but I thought I stated fairly clearly that I have not had extensive time on both bikes.

    "I won't comment on the the differences between these two bikes because I haven't had expensive time on either"

    However, I have had time on both traditional single pivots and ABP bikes and can attest to the differences between both designs.
    As I said earlier, the Yeti will inevitably have brake jack, and as other riders here have attested, that may not be a bad thing.

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    I bought the Roscoe!

    I bought the Roscoe several weeks after I originally posted my question. I've been riding it all summer and it has been an amazing bike. My only upgrade so far is swithing to tubless which has made the ride even sweeter. I purchased this bike because it just felt better than the Yeti. Yeti makes a great bike but the Roscoe won in the end for me. I don't think there's anything out there that has the burliness of the Roscoe yet still climbs and handles like a XC bike. Hopefully I can get a trip in to Mammoth Mtn to see how this bike handles on some bigger stuff.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by oceanminded
    I bought the Roscoe several weeks after I originally posted my question. I've been riding it all summer and it has been an amazing bike. My only upgrade so far is swithing to tubless which has made the ride even sweeter. I purchased this bike because it just felt better than the Yeti. Yeti makes a great bike but the Roscoe won in the end for me. I don't think there's anything out there that has the burliness of the Roscoe yet still climbs and handles like a XC bike. Hopefully I can get a trip in to Mammoth Mtn to see how this bike handles on some bigger stuff.
    Sweet!

    I can't believe I never noticed this thread was 6 months old

    I need to go ride...

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    I made the same choice as well...

    I went with a GF Roscoe as well and love it. The 575 still looks better I think but the Roscoe just felt right for me. It feels as fast as my old 08 Cannondale Rush but ALOT burlier. My only upgrade has been Specialized Lo Pro 2 Pedals...

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    Quote Originally Posted by droman
    I've owned both -- the Yeti 575 and a Roscoe III. I actually sold my 575 to by the Roscoe because I fell in love with the latter bike. I had a top of the line XTR build on the Yeti and it was a great bike but had three things that bothered me (all of which the Roscoe specifically resolves!). <br>First, the single pivot suspension leaves a lot to be desired in the beginning and end of the stroke. Acceleration was poor because I'd sink into the suspension when I accelerated hard, and on drop the suspension ramps up really hard at the end and doesn't feel good. The bike performed great while in the middle part of the stroke, but for more aggressive riding it disappointed me. Second, the suspension firms up under brake force. Last, it's not a stiff as the Roscoe.<br>The Roscoe is downright amazing -- honestly. Quality travel over longer travel any day. The rear suspension feels bottomless and beautifully supple. The fork is fantastic, won't ever be woefully outdated, and balances perfectly with the bike -- yes you can put a 160mm fork on the Yeti, but it rakes out the angles too much and only intensifies the issues with the rear suspension. The ABP on the Roscoe keeps the rear suspension active at all times, even under hard braking. And the stiffness of the Roscoe is awesome, making it more stable on downhills and corner significantly better. Don't get me wrong, the Yeti 575 is a great bike and I loved it. It's just that the Roscoe better, which says a lot about the Roscoe.
    This guy is right,went from a 575 to a remedy,same gig...

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by oceanminded
    I bought the Roscoe several weeks after I originally posted my question. I've been riding it all summer and it has been an amazing bike. My only upgrade so far is swithing to tubless which has made the ride even sweeter. I purchased this bike because it just felt better than the Yeti. Yeti makes a great bike but the Roscoe won in the end for me. I don't think there's anything out there that has the burliness of the Roscoe yet still climbs and handles like a XC bike. Hopefully I can get a trip in to Mammoth Mtn to see how this bike handles on some bigger stuff.
    Awesome choice!

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