Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Freeride bikes

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    56

    Freeride bikes

    Just a quick question....These freeride bike that I see pictures of.....It looks like the seat isn't able to go up high enough to sit and pedal. Are these bikes made mostly for standing??

  2. #2
    lotto baby
    Reputation: clarkenstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    553
    i guess you could say they are made mostly for standing, the real reason is to keep the seat out of the way during drops/steep descents.

    you'd be surprised tho - i ride a brodie bruzza (size XL) and am perfectly comfortable riding that thing on x/c trails - i have plenty of seat extension, so some of the freeride bikes do have just enough seat tube and post to get you to a good riding position, some, not so much.
    i spurt in the wind, and the wind drug it

  3. #3
    Crashing hurts.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    33
    I think most FR bikes have plenty seat tube out of the box for full leg extension, but most people I know have them cut down. The desire to be able to drop the seat out of the way on the descents usually outweighs the desire to be able to sit up high and pedal.
    Hanging out in Whistler... Just another day in paradise.

  4. #4
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    What nicoli says and

    the seat is dropped so the rider can get back to manual off things, manoeuvre the bike below the torso, and stay poised standing on the pedals, without seat interference.

    From a safety standpoint, a saddle in the gut or groin can ruin your whole day. An acquaintance at Whistler took a saddle hit a few years back and had to have 30' (yes feet) of intestine removed, so if you consider hitting something head on by accident with the saddle up, you will take the butt end of the saddle squarely in the gut, which on a bad day, can kill you.

    Jim

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    276
    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    the seat is dropped so the rider can get back to manual off things, manoeuvre the bike below the torso, and stay poised standing on the pedals, without seat interference.

    From a safety standpoint, a saddle in the gut or groin can ruin your whole day. An acquaintance at Whistler took a saddle hit a few years back and had to have 30' (yes feet) of intestine removed, so if you consider hitting something head on by accident with the saddle up, you will take the butt end of the saddle squarely in the gut, which on a bad day, can kill you.

    Jim
    I don't mean any disrespect but I'm calling ******** on that. The average straightened length of the intestinal tract from opening at the pylorus to the ending at the anus is a little LESS than 30 feet, so even if this guy was some skyscraping giant, 30 feet of intestine removed would leave almost nothing left. Certainly too little for any kind of digestion to take place.

  6. #6
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    OK by me...

    it's what I was advised of, and clearly it was incorrect. Apologies. Regardless, a saddle in the gut, at speed to a dead stop, will certainly cause some damage or worse.

    Jim

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    459
    Maybe it was 30", not 30'

  8. #8
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    Hey, I'm old

    and it was a few years back, I'm sure I'm wrong, but I don't know the correct length. that said, doesn't really matter, the seat was up too high, the rider took a saddle hit, and the result was removal of part of his intestinal tract.

    jc

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    276
    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    and it was a few years back, I'm sure I'm wrong, but I don't know the correct length. that said, doesn't really matter, the seat was up too high, the rider took a saddle hit, and the result was removal of part of his intestinal tract.

    jc
    Yeah, the length isn't so much as important as the fact the guy crashed hard enough to need the surgery in the first place. Go damn that would be painful, laying on the ground waiting to get flown out to the hospital. I've heard hernias hurt like no other, I couldn't IMAGINE that though.

  10. #10
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    Actually hernias are a walk in

    the (bike) park, having been there, and now it's laproscopic and non-invasive, so no pain hardly and only day surgery. but I digress...

    About 2002 or so, another rider I didn't know crashed at Whizzler having missed the tabletop landing and came up short, and body slammed. Meatwagon arrives, off he goes to the clinic (no slouches there, they've seen every sports trauma imaginable) and they take care of him. Except he had broken some ribs, severed an artery or vein internally, and in 3 hours was gone. One of those things that doesn't show up easily on X rays?

    The next day, six of us migrated to full upper body armour, which until them wasn't on any or our radar screens, as it was quite costly back then. Still use it, and it's paid for itself many times over.

    jc

  11. #11
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,473
    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    and it was a few years back, I'm sure I'm wrong, but I don't know the correct length. that said, doesn't really matter, the seat was up too high, the rider took a saddle hit, and the result was removal of part of his intestinal tract.

    jc
    I'll bet they meant 30" I think if they removed 30' of anything you would swallow and sh!t something all in one motion.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thirdnipple's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    126
    I need to know, how long were the removed intestines? Tell me. You know, a couple feet, ah, wouldn't miss it. But if it was more than 30" I'm gonna have to get one of those adjust on the fly seatposts. I don't want to have to wear a diaper.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •