View Poll Results: Yay or nay on height adjustable seatposts?

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  • Yes! they make an all-mountain bike even more versitile.

    84 80.77%
  • No! Too heavy, not worth the weight increase.

    20 19.23%
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  1. #1
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    On the fly adjustable seatposts... worth the weight?

    I've been noticing alot of manufacturers putting these on-the-fly height adjustable seat posts on their bikes this year such as the Crank Brothers Joplin, and or the older Maverick Speedball. I love the concept, especially for all mountain riding, however they are really hefty things; more than double the weight of a Thomson. I personally don't think the convenience increase outweighs the increase in high center of gravity girth, however I'd love to hear some arguments against that, because like i said, I love the concept.

    Yay? Nay?

  2. #2
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    Well, seeing as we are talking all-mountain riding here instead of XC, not at all too heavy and definitely worth the weight. I'll take a bit of a weight hit in order to improve performance/ ride quality.

  3. #3
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    I think they are well worth the weight penalty, if your local terrain has lots of ups and downs.

    Full on XC racers wouldn't want the extra weight, and people who ride in realtively flat terrain probably shouldn't bother.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker
    I think they are well worth the weight penalty, if your local terrain has lots of ups and downs.

    Full on XC racers wouldn't want the extra weight, and people who ride in realtively flat terrain probably shouldn't bother.
    You guys are right, i guess it does depend on the terrain your riding on. Out here in Colorado, its up up up, then down down down, so if you choose to change your seat post height, its only once.

  5. #5
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    There is a thread about the posts where I comment about mine (not very well made IMO) But, despite the weight and the issues I've had with it, I would not ride without it now. Miles better- plus on my 09 Reign the standard post wouldn't get out of the way far enough- this actually goes lower, and therefore I'm happier on the steep stuff.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, I just got a Joplin-R about three months ago, and I can't imagine riding without one now.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by raceface9465
    You guys are right, i guess it does depend on the terrain your riding on. Out here in Colorado, its up up up, then down down down, so if you choose to change your seat post height, its only once.
    My local terrain really is ideal for an adjustable.

    Before, I used to always ride with the seat at max height. But certain downhill sketchy runs were a little scary with a high seat, so I took to stopping and lowering my seat for these certain downhills. It made a huge difference to me, the overall lower center of gravity and the seat was way low and easy to scoot back from. Really picked up my DH speed and confidence.

    Of course, that meant you had to stop at the bottom to raise it back up for the following climb.

    Sometimes I would choose to just "leave the seat up" for this little bit of downhill section, because I knew a climb came right after it, and I didn't feel like stopping and "losing the flow".

    Or worse, after lowering it for a descent, just leaving it low and trying to climb with a lowered saddle. Again, because it was just "for a little bit, I'll stop at the next one".

    With the adjustment now just a thumb-push away, you never have to compromise, or "lose the flow".

    To sum it up, if you are a rider who never adjusts their seat height, and are comfortable with that, move along, then, nothing to see here. However, if you are a rider who is always raising and lowering your seat height, once you ride with an on-the-fly adjustable seat post you will never want to ride without one again.

  8. #8
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    Worth every penny IMO. The extra 1/2 pound over my EC90 post I couldn't tell,plus it makes it a lot easier on my carbon frame just "set it and forget it!"

  9. #9
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    no real input as I ride XC... but i think it's funny... i remember these kinds of things from the early 90's in the mags... 93 or 94 maybe...

    this was on a bike I was looking to buy... circa '88
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by raceface9465
    You guys are right, i guess it does depend on the terrain your riding on. Out here in Colorado, its up up up, then down down down, so if you choose to change your seat post height, its only once.
    That is not my experience in Colorado. I couldn't imagine riding without my adjustable post. We have mountains with long climbs and long descents but we have lots of up and down as well - particularly if you travel to places like fruita and moab.

  11. #11
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    Yeah, I think the OP hit it on the head. If you are riding up, up, then down, down. There is absolutely no reason for an adjustable; you are probably stopping at the top to throw on armor and the full-face, so the seatpost is not a big comparative inconvenience.

    To contrast, on some of the trails I ride around here, it's climb, climb, descend, climb, descend, descend, climb, descend, 1/2 climb, descend, repeat (or something like that), and the descents are techy enough that there is a high probability leaving the seatpost up=planting your face in a rock (at least for me). I spend the whole ride messing with my seatpost, trying to find a compromise that lets me sit down to climb & get far enough over the back of the bike to avoid disaster, or trying to climb w/ the seat down, or riding/praying on a short section that I just don't want to lower the seat for.

    As soon as I get my tax return, I am buying a Gravity Dropper. period

  12. #12
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    Commuting to the trails, it's obviously gotta be up. Same with the family-friendly rail trails. But once I'm at the singletrack, I drop the seat, even when I don't need it down, because I'd rather stand through the climbs etc than have the seat in the way when I'm dropping and carving.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by raceface9465
    I've been noticing alot of manufacturers putting these on-the-fly height adjustable seat posts on their bikes this year such as the Crank Brothers Joplin, and or the older Maverick Speedball. I love the concept, especially for all mountain riding, however they are really hefty things; more than double the weight of a Thomson. I personally don't think the convenience increase outweighs the increase in high center of gravity girth, however I'd love to hear some arguments against that, because like i said, I love the concept.

    Yay? Nay?
    Abso-freakin-lutely!

    I think the weight is really a non-issue considering the benifits, unless we are talking weight wienie xc racer bike. The cost on the other hand..... that I can see as being a dealbreaker.

    I've got a GD post on my MKIII and love it! I don't have one on the hardtail (Karate Monkey), but that is a bike I usually run single-speed, and occasionally rigid, so the GD kind of goes against the general flavor of the bike, which is all about the challenge. The MKIII is all about having the best possible tool for he job (suspension, gears, GD post), and giving me more confidence to try new things.

  14. #14
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    Maybe if they would cost somewhere around $100but I think too many people put their seats up way to high and way too low. I live in the CO high country and almost every ride here is up, up, up, and down, down, down. So I would rarely need it but see the laziness it encourages. Maybe I would consider it if I rode more "slickrock trail" style up,down fests. But when I go to Fruita or ride more XC trails, I just set the post in the middle somewhere. I don't need to slam my post down that far to be comfortable on the steep downhills nor do I need to raise my seat up to some extreme level that I see some other riders do to climb effectively.
    On most AM/XC trails I just leave my seat height in one position and ride all day long. No problem. If my trails were super steep up and down constantly, I would see a greater benefit. But I hate trails like that.
    So no I don't have a desire to have one.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wormvine
    Maybe if they would cost somewhere around $100but I think too many people put their seats up way to high and way too low. I live in the CO high country and almost every ride here is up, up, up, and down, down, down. So I would rarely need it but see the laziness it encourages. Maybe I would consider it if I rode more "slickrock trail" style up,down fests. But when I go to Fruita or ride more XC trails, I just set the post in the middle somewhere. I don't need to slam my post down that far to be comfortable on the steep downhills nor do I need to raise my seat up to some extreme level that I see some other riders do to climb effectively.
    On most AM/XC trails I just leave my seat height in one position and ride all day long. No problem. If my trails were super steep up and down constantly, I would see a greater benefit. But I hate trails like that.
    So no I don't have a desire to have one.
    Not laziness, it allows you to keep your flow and do it in a more controlled safer manner. I was of the same opinion......till I tried one....now I have one on my bike and one in the way for the old Lady's bike....is it wort it...absolutely yes...
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saxon9598
    Not laziness, it allows you to keep your flow and do it in a more controlled safer manner. I was of the same opinion......till I tried one....now I have one on my bike and one in the way for the old Lady's bike....is it wort it...absolutely yes...
    I don't mean laziness in the "I don't feel like getting off my bike to adjust" sense. I meant lazy technique. I don't quite know what makes it safer. Like I said, I don't need to constantly adjust my seat height because I developed the ability to adjust to the ups and downs without an aid. I just ride and never think about it. Would I benefit from an adjustable seat post? I am sure I would, My rides would also benefit from a dirt bike.
    It would also be nice if I had a support rider with me carrying all my gear and water so I wouldn't have to. They're trick and they're slick but I don't want one. To each his own though. Some riders think suspension is overkill.
    Last edited by wormvine; 02-28-2009 at 09:12 PM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by wormvine
    I don't mean laziness in the "I don't feel like getting off my bike to adjust" sense. I meant lazy technique. I don't quite know what makes it safer. Like I said, I don't need to constantly adjust my seat height because I developed the ability to adjust to the ups and downs without an aid. I just ride and never think about it. Would I benefit from an adjustable seat post? I am sure I would, My rides would also benefit from a dirt bike.
    It would also be nice if I had a support rider with me carrying all my gear and water so I wouldn't have to. They're trick and they're slick but I don't want one. To each his own though. Some riders think suspension is overkill.
    Safer? I wouldn't put it that way particularly, it's mountain biking after all. For me it's about flow, ease of lowering the saddle and simply returning my seat to optimal pedaling height after lowering it (even if it's just to put it in the back of my vehicle). People spend $100 on posts that do nothing, why not spend a bit more than twice that for one that does something? I've ridden in areas of Colorado where it came in quite handy, too. It's not lazy technique, it takes your technique and gives you a further advantage over a static saddle position. Sometimes you just have to try something, too. One of the comments that convinced me to try it was from Mark Weir when he said he used it as much or even more than his derailleur in a race, piqued my curiosity and it paid off for me at least. Like you said (as does my signature)...to each his own. I resisted suspension at one point too
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by wormvine
    I don't mean laziness in the "I don't feel like getting off my bike to adjust" sense. I meant lazy technique. . . .
    That's unnecessarily judgmental.

    I had a Joplin for a few months. My trails are definitely the sketchy, steep, and rocky, up, down, up, down, type, and I appreciated the extra confidence and flow the Joplin allowed over riding a post that's too low for a good pedal stroke or too high to get behind the saddle comfortably (or the compromise of a post positioned somewhere in the middle).

    Quote Originally Posted by wormvine
    . . . Some riders think suspension is overkill.
    Exactly.

    To the OP, I think they are worth the weight, but it all depends on your riding style, trails, and your own individual preferences. Like others have written, it's the price that makes them questionable.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by wormvine
    I don't mean laziness in the "I don't feel like getting off my bike to adjust" sense. I meant lazy technique..
    Oh, you mean like gears, suspension, and freewheels? I get it.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    Oh, you mean like gears, suspension, and freewheels? I get it.
    Yep, you're right. It's completely personal preference. Some think that a rigid, fixie, single speed is the right way to ride. Then there is the 29er single speeder's. The 1x9 guys who think one ring is enough. Others say Hardtails breed better riding techniques over FS and FS aren't necessary. And now we have the adjustable seatpost gang.

    I guess I should have stuck to the OP's original question.
    Weight too much, NO!
    Price too much for my daily riding trails. YES!

  21. #21
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    I bought mine (amp) with the intention of swapping it regularly with my thomson for races & non-technical rides. So far, I haven't done this once. I am so much faster on the downhills -- and even on singletrack where that extra 1" of standover height helps me get in a better, fluid 'attack' position -- that it more than makes up for the incredibly minor effect that additional, non-rotational weight may have (which I think is mostly psychological anyway). Overall, I am undoubtedly faster with the post than without it, even under xc race conditions: no reason NOT to use one.

  22. #22
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    wow i really didn't expect quite so many people to be for it to be honest. I know weight isnt a huge factor in AM riding, but it is still a factor, and when your talking about doubling the weight of the seat post which is one of the highest components placed on the bike, i would have thought more people would be against the idea. I'm intrigued with everyone's responses though, and kinda want to try one now.

  23. #23
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    Where are you riding in Colorado???

    I was out yesterday on my Enduro 20 miles, and by the end had decided without a doubt I would be buying an adjustable seat post.

    I started heading up Hall and had my seat up. I dropped it at the top, but when I started coming down those rock gardens I decided pretty quickly I had not moved my seat down enough, so I stopped and dropped it another inch. Got to the bottom, and raised it back up to ride over to Picture Rock and up. Got to the top, and dropped the seat, but even though it's downhill the whole way, it's not downhill enough that you don't have to pedal a lot. Well I lowered it too much this time, and had to stop again to find that middle range of descending and still being able to pedal easily. So basically I had to adjust my seat post 6 times to get it where I needed for the various terrain.

    I wouldn't put one on my XC bike because I don't have trouble getting back behind the seat like on the Enduro, and I don't take the same kind of drops.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by raceface9465
    wow i really didn't expect quite so many people to be for it to be honest. I know weight isnt a huge factor in AM riding, but it is still a factor, and when your talking about doubling the weight of the seat post which is one of the highest components placed on the bike, i would have thought more people would be against the idea. I'm intrigued with everyone's responses though, and kinda want to try one now.
    It's not THAT much heavier, and it's no higher than your stem, bar, or anything on your bar

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitek79
    Where are you riding in Colorado???

    I was out yesterday on my Enduro 20 miles, and by the end had decided without a doubt I would be buying an adjustable seat post.

    I started heading up Hall and had my seat up. I dropped it at the top, but when I started coming down those rock gardens I decided pretty quickly I had not moved my seat down enough, so I stopped and dropped it another inch. Got to the bottom, and raised it back up to ride over to Picture Rock and up. Got to the top, and dropped the seat, but even though it's downhill the whole way, it's not downhill enough that you don't have to pedal a lot. Well I lowered it too much this time, and had to stop again to find that middle range of descending and still being able to pedal easily. So basically I had to adjust my seat post 6 times to get it where I needed for the various terrain.

    I wouldn't put one on my XC bike because I don't have trouble getting back behind the seat like on the Enduro, and I don't take the same kind of drops.

    lol, that sounds pretty dramatic. No offense but it doesn't sound like you've been riding that bike very long. I'm not completely against an adjustable seatpost now after reading this thread, but when i do adjust the height of my seatpost, i know where to put it to suit the given terrain. From the info i gathered on the other thread on this subject, it appears that many of these seat posts have incremental adjustments, which doesnt seem like it would help you much at all if you are that picky about where your saddle is. Also most of them don't drop that far, only 3 or 4 inches, so if your changing your seat height that dramatically, again, a gravity dropper may not help you.

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