flats, durable pins...

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  • 11-09-2012
    Jwind
    flats, durable pins...
    Seems like tons of pedal threads. Maybe it's the signal to noise ratio or maybe it's just that i'm not very bright today but I'm totally lost on flats. Up until now, i've always done the clips with platform IE mallet and minnar similar.

    This Winter I've decided I'm going to give plats and 5.10s a valid effort. Shoes are pretty straight forward. I'm totally lost with pedals. Please help me. I don't buy cheap gear. I also don't spend a 50% premium for XTR over XT. Seems like a bazillion options... Are there any sort of favorites that at tried and true or is there more of a preference thing? Lastly, I live in the desert. I need pins that I can actually remove after a rock strick or something...
  • 11-09-2012
    GhostRing
    Was going to link you to the pedal shootout, but you'll figure it out. ;)

    I am currently using Answer Roves due to fair price, decent size/weight and non-setscrew pins
    I did re-profile all of them to get more bite, but they have held up quite well to repeated rock strikes.
  • 11-09-2012
    Carraig042
    I use the Straitline Defacto pedals on my DH rig and those pins hold up exceptionally well. They are the non-set screw type.

    -Brett
  • 11-09-2012
    Jwind
    Thanks. this thread? http://forums.mtbr.com/downhill-free...at-607155.html it's 2 years old now - that's all.
  • 11-09-2012
    Jwind
    ya never mind. Monster thread. Not sure weather to thanks you for the information or than you for confusing me more with too much ;)
  • 11-09-2012
    Jwind
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Carraig042 View Post
    I use the Straitline Defacto pedals on my DH rig and those pins hold up exceptionally well. They are the non-set screw type.

    -Brett

    Those look maybe a little heavy for trail riding. Any feedback on the amps?
  • 11-09-2012
    hitechredneck
    I just use the wellgo flats during the winter. I have not had a problem with them at all and they are cheap and easy to replace.
  • 11-09-2012
    GhostRing
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jwind View Post
    ya never mind. Monster thread. Not sure weather to thanks you for the information or than you for confusing me more with too much ;)

    haha! probably the latter...
  • 11-09-2012
    bad andy
    Steel pins. Screw from behind (not set-screws) will be most sturdy. You'll pay a premium for under 17mm thick pedals, but thin pedals are quite nice. The pedal thread is where it's at.
  • 11-09-2012
    slimat99
    Try to avoid pins that require you to back out damaged threads through the pedal body.

    Screw from the bottom pins often mess up the pedal body threads when backed out. Grub style top mounted pins when damaged can be difficult to remove. Top mounted hex pins are by far the best I've used. They are easy to remove even when damaged and they protect the pedal body threads. There's a few companies using hex pins. Straitline, HT, Syntace, Deity...come to mind. You can also by packs of straitline pins and tap most pedals for them.

    in addition to hex pins, I like e13's pin design. I also like their replaceable composite plates that should slide off rocks better than metal. Ti axle option for weight watchers too.
  • 11-09-2012
    Jwind
    Great info here thanks. What do you mean "pedal threads are where it's at?"
  • 11-09-2012
    GhostRing
    "thread is" not "threads are"

    He's referencing the previously linked pedal forum thread.
  • 11-09-2012
    Coondog#77
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jwind View Post
    Great info here thanks. What do you mean "pedal threads are where it's at?"

    That as mentioned before, there is a lot o info to be found in the "pedal shoot out thread".

    I've been searching for some new pedals to replace my Odessey's. After looking through the above thread (not page by page), I've settled on a set of Deity pedals. You should check it out!
  • 11-09-2012
    Jwind
    Ahh. Thanks guys.
  • 11-09-2012
    Treebumper
    I read that whole thread. My Saints should be here on Monday, usually can't go wrong with Shimano.
  • 11-09-2012
    good4nothing
    Thinnest pedal platforms on the market. Never snag your pedal again!

    hard to go wrong. thin pedal, thick pins, super-durable. I've had a pair of ultimates on an 8" One with a 12 & 1/8" BB that i've been bouncing off of rocks all season without any issues.
  • 11-10-2012
    ride the biscuit
    diety compound. they're plastic...brilliant design though. very tall, replaceable pins - probably grippier than the high-end alloys i had before. i read too that the pins can be found at any hardware store too, which is great

    thin profile, much lighter than alloy, only $50. I've had them almost a year, and a bunch of my friends switched to them too after checking them out
  • 11-10-2012
    evasive
    Since you made a point of saying you don't buy cheap gear, that narrows the field somewhat.

    I like my twenty6 pedals, but it doesn't sound like that's what you're looking for. Point1 is an obvious one to consider. I've seen a number of broken Deity and Xpedo pedals locally.

    My contribution: I second what good4nothing posted. Take a serious look at the Crampon Ultimates. They're a fantastic pedal. I bought mine specifically as a desert pedal to save my twenty6 Predators from UT trip abuse, and I am really impressed with them. They're $150 direct from the Brothers, come in a bunch of colors, and are really thin. Really strong, too. The pins are stout and can be installed point up or point down. I prefer point up so that I can use the hex wrench from the opposite side and advance the pin threads out if I bend one. That said, I've given them some really good whacks and the pins are still all straight.

    Much as I drool over most of Saint offerings, their pedal design was dated before it shipped, IMO. Same with e13. Canfields are the first to go convex and I saw some Internet chatter about how nonsensical that is, but I expect we'll see more companies doing the same when people figure out how well it works and how much sense it makes when pedals get that thin.
  • 11-10-2012
    Zen Cyclery
    I have been rocking the KCNC Steady pedals for quite a while now. I haven't had to replace any of the pins yet, and they have taken some good bashes on rocks and stumps.
    Overall, I would highly recommend them. They come with a ton of extra pins, and plus I love the look of them.
  • 11-10-2012
    Jwind
    Awesome feedback. So a few that I'm considering...

    -Straitline Amps
    -Crampon Ultimates
    -Spank Spikes
    -Local shop is a loaded dealer. I'm sure I can get a good deal with them. Anything worth looking at there?

    Why wouldn't the twenty6 pedal be what I'm looking for?
  • 11-10-2012
    slimat99
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jwind View Post
    Awesome feedback. So a few that I'm considering...

    -Straitline Amps
    -Crampon Ultimates
    -Spank Spikes
    -Local shop is a loaded dealer. I'm sure I can get a good deal with them. Anything worth looking at there?

    Why wouldn't the twenty6 pedal be what I'm looking for?

    Here's some things to think about:

    AMP's have a small platform, I loved everything about them but size was a deal breaker for me

    Crampons are slightly convex but people say they feel flat with pins. (most pedals are concave which I feel adds traction and feel)

    Concave, convex, or flat is really personal preference but most people will agree concave offers the best traction. The degree of concavity can vary. Super thin pedals usually have a smaller amount of concavity. In the case of the Crampons they are so thin at the edges they have to be convex to make room for the axle and bearings. You may love this, or hate it? I was very attracted to the crampons until I felt them under foot. I def prefer concave.

    What I look for in a flat is minimum of 100mmx100mm size, pin design that doesn't require backing out damaged pins, bearings over bushings (bushings tend to spin poorly and develop play easily) and lastly thickness. Thin pedals offer a better feel IMO.

    Shoe size and riding style def play a big role. If you want to move your feet easier convex or flat with short pins or fewer pins are the way to go. If you want max traction concave, large platform, and longer pins will be preferred. I've had to try a number of different pedals over the years to figure out what I like and don't like. Unlike clips, feel can vary greatly with flats.
  • 11-10-2012
    evasive
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jwind View Post
    Why wouldn't the twenty6 pedal be what I'm looking for?

    The pins are designed to break away rather than bend or strip out of the body. They're consumable and I go through a set ($30-$40 depending) in a season or two. The pins are machined in house with the pedals so they're more expensive than grub screws.

    The pedals are super s3xy and probably the grippiest on the market, but your original post called for pedals with durable pins.
  • 11-10-2012
    slimat99
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    The pins are designed to break away rather than bend or strip out of the body. They're consumable and I go through a set ($30-$40 depending) in a season or two. The pins are machined in house with the pedals so they're more expensive than grub screws.

    The pedals are super s3xy and probably the grippiest on the market, but your original post called for pedals with durable pins.

    I can second that. I've owned rally's and prerunners. The latter have the weakest pins I've used, but very grippy. I gave up on those pins after going through 20 extras and tapped my runners for straitline pins. SO much more durable. Straitline pins are super tough. Probably the toughest on the market, and easiest to remove and replace when damaged.
  • 11-10-2012
    WarBoom
    I snapped my loaded cromo pedals at the threads so I got big boy pedals, the e13 lg1 flats and man are they grippy! I have to lift my feet off the pedals just like I would with my eggbeaters, they are almost as grippy feeling as being clipless
  • 11-10-2012
    Jwind
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    The pedals are super s3xy and probably the grippiest on the market, but your original post called for pedals with durable pins.

    I've destroyed 1/2 of the set screw on my mallets in a year. Being new to flats and living in the UT desert, i'd likely destroy twice what you do. That being said, a nice product is a nice product...

    Interesting point about concave/convex. My initial thought are I'd prefer as much grip as possible. Especially when first changing from clips to flats...

    Toss up on the amps now. I don't have a terrible large foot at 9 1/2 but I could see how some extra room would be nice...