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  1. #1
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    Flat Pedal Recommendations (after 10+ years of clipless)

    I've been riding XC for about 15 years and pretty much always clipped in. But I'm now getting into more AM trails and jumps that have recently been added to my area.

    I'm guessing it makes sense to switch to flats? I tried my cheap plastic flats today and some things felt surprisingly good - technical climbs, bike control. My jumps sucked and were small and sketchy but I started to get a better feel for keeping my feet on the pedals as the ride went on.

    Anyway, what are some flats I should start with? Also are specific MTB shoes very helpful too, or are typical athletic shoes fine to start?

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    I just made the switch to flats last summer for park riding and winter riding and really digging it but..... I still am struggling to find the right pedals. I started off with Raceface Atlas which I really liked the grip (almost too much) but I couldn't get used to the bearing bump next to the crank arm, always seemed like my foot was up on it. Then I tried a set of Raceface Aeffects that I had on my fat bike and altho the grip was ok they seemed a little small. Next I went to a set of DMR Vaults, size seemed perfect but I don't care for the pins. They use a allen screw instead of a pin which doesn't seem to mate as well to my 5 10s but they do a great job with my winter boots. Once winter is over I am going to take the screws out of the DMR's and replace them with the pins from my Raceface pedals and I'm hoping that will fit my needs.

    Sorry no real help here but just thought I would share my experiences.

  5. #5
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    Pedaling Innovations Catalyst

    Found a pedal for life. These things are awesome and do just what the company says they'll do.

  6. #6
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    I've been using Wellgo MG-1 for about 5 years or so. Now that I just got a new bike, I wanted different one and got OneUp composite pedal. That and FiveTen Freerider, I thought I was using clipless(Driveway test) Couple of times, I almost couldn't put my feet down because it stick so well. It will probably get better as I get used to it but for price, I think they are perfect!
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  7. #7
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    Spank Spikes

  8. #8
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    i use these, theyre only $20. light, solid, comfy, grippy, no bearings to mess with either. ive had them for like 1.5-2 years. 0 problems

    theyre the V6

    they make metal ones too..

    https://www.dmrbikes.com/Catalogue/Pedals/Vault-2/Vault


  9. #9
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    I have been loving the Oneup Components Composite Flat Pedals. These are big pedals with loads of spikes to keep your feet planted. They seem to take a beating being composite and under $50 to boot. Read the review here that swayed me.OneUp Composite flat pedal review - Mtbr.com

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by titusquasi View Post
    Pedaling Innovations Catalyst

    Found a pedal for life. These things are awesome and do just what the company says they'll do.
    Outstanding pedals!

  11. #11
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    Spank Spikes. Half Cabs.
    T275a

  12. #12
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    TMACs.
    2018 Transition Patrol

  13. #13
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    I currently run saints which I love, except for they are a little heavy and thick. Looking to switch to a composite pedal. Either Chester's or the new Kona wah wah 2. I would go with one ups except they are convex and I like a concave pedal.

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  14. #14
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    5 10 shoes are the most popular, and will be grippier than regular running shoes due to their awesome grippy rubber compound. It is grippy on rocks when off the bike too, and durable.

  15. #15
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    One thing about flats is that they tend to be wider (stick out further from the crank) than clipless, thus increasing a tendency to hit the pedal on things if the bike is leaned over, because they're closer to the ground, important if you're pouring the coal on coming around a turn. One thing that's been helpful to me is running the thinnest flats I can find. To date, my favorite because:

    1) It's thin. One of the thinest I've seen.
    2) Grip is good. Not the best. But better than some. I've not slipped one in 5:10s.
    3) Weight - I'm not a weight weenie, but I don't like to carry around more than I need for reliability. These are some of the lightest pedals I've seen, and I got 3.5 years out of my first set of them. That's good enough.
    4) Reliability - see 3.
    5) Price. You can get some plastic pedals for less, but for a thin pedal, that's light and reliable, you won't touch the price on these.

    Xpedo Spry.

  16. #16
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    I rode exclusively clipless before switching to flats on the mtb 2 years ago. It was steep learning curve. Much steeper than learning clipless.

    There's a near infinity of good flat pedals out there. My preferences are for thin pedals with aggressive metal pins. Raceface Chesters are plastic with metal pins and are very good. Raceface Aeffect are metal and cost more, and Atlas are their top-of-the-line. All good. Spank Oozy or Spoon pedals are good too. There are tons of others.

    For shoes, arguably the best are mtb flat pedal specific with Stealth rubber soles, which really grip the pins. Soles are moderately stiff so you can feel the pedal under your foot and know the position of your foot on it. Fiveten is a very popular brand, but there are many others. I also have a pair of Shimano shoes. The rubber is not as grippy as stealth but still pretty good.
    Do the math.

  17. #17
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    With almost any flat pedal over 40-50 EUR (only limit is the sky then :-) and with pair of 5-10 shoes you cannot go wrong. Some very popular and quality pedals are Shimano Saint, Crankbrothers, Spank,Deity. Choose according to your budget/liking, all of them have good grip and quality. And dont read too much opinions because its like with phones. Some like Apple, some Samsung, some LG etc. But everyone will svear than their choice is the best. In reality i think any pedal in that price range will be good enough, especially for flats begginer/intermediate.

  18. #18
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    I just switched to flats for the winter, went with RF Chesters and 5/10 Freeriders both were on sale and get lots of kudos from others. Been clipped in for decades.

    That being said, like Lone Ranger stated, this is way tougher (for me) than anticipated. I coming off the pedals way more than I want. I've realized that I'm such a "boob" that I actually lift up with my clipless pedals because I'm coming off the flats on some steeps, lol. I cannot do the same things yet that I was able to do clipped in which is frustrating and I'm still trying to do the little twist to unclip, lol, which is impossible with pins and sticky rubber.

    It's like teaching an old dog new tricks. I think I'll get it though...sooner or later.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by titusquasi View Post
    Pedaling Innovations Catalyst

    Found a pedal for life. These things are awesome and do just what the company says they'll do.
    Thanks for posting that link. I'm intrigued and will look into these further. I like your user name, are you still on a Titus? I'm on a Motolite I built myself.

  20. #20
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    I switched to Chesters and 510s a couple of seasons ago after a decade with clipless. Took a couple of rides for me to adjust but I didn't find it difficult. As Cotharyus said, I was getting more pedal strikes initially.
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    Spank Spikes
    I use Spank Oozy. I think the Oozy is supposed to be lighter? Probably a little less burly but I'm not that heavy and they are rebuild-able.

    Shoes, IMHO, are probably MORE important to some degree than the pedals themselves. I use adidas terrex trail cross sl (very similar to five tens but typically cheaper) and the grip is fantastic.
    I think Adidas owns the five ten brand as well.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidbeinct View Post
    Thanks for posting that link. I'm intrigued and will look into these further. I like your user name, are you still on a Titus? I'm on a Motolite I built myself.
    I have dmr v8, great pedal with good support if you ride on the ball of the foot. I have specialized bennies, great pedal as well, allows you to plant your feet better. But the catalyst from pedaling innovations is UNMATCHED! Ive ordered myself one and my wife stolen it from me so good this beast is. its like extra gear you can really pedal and bring power to the bike. its not so good if you want to pedal with the ball of the foot as the pins are little bit spaced to the edges.

    Its a game changer. I would really recommend this pedal. other benefits that comes with it:
    1 - you will adjust you saddle about a inch lower, which will bring yourself and your center of gravity towards the ground which is just great.
    2 - after you pedal it once, you will be kind of be able to mimic its properties and way of pedaling on regular flats (I had to reinstall my spz bennies after my wife stole it from me)
    3 - its better to stand on it. just more ground to step on
    4 - no penalty on spinning as many will think. I have garmin to keep my spinning check and havent felt it harder to keep 90rpm.

    they have a money back guarantee so go for it. it worth.

  23. #23
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    forgot to answer on the shoes. regular shoes will do. but 5 10s provides an edge. Im eager to find cheaper contenders to 5 10 as Im not willing to pay the price they charge. But yes, it does make a difference. get 5-10s if you wanna go bullet proof. if budget is low try the shoes you have to see which ones goes better

  24. #24
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    I have crank bothers 50/50 but looking for something else. Bought my son Chesters for Christmas and they seem good. Im lookin at one up alum flats for me now


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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by titusquasi View Post
    Pedaling Innovations Catalyst

    Found a pedal for life. These things are awesome and do just what the company says they'll do.
    Ditto!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by edmodasvirgens View Post
    forgot to answer on the shoes. regular shoes will do. but 5 10s provides an edge. Im eager to find cheaper contenders to 5 10 as Im not willing to pay the price they charge. But yes, it does make a difference. get 5-10s if you wanna go bullet proof. if budget is low try the shoes you have to see which ones goes better
    They have an outlet on their site, with some luck you can get them 1/2 price on older models.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    They have an outlet on their site, with some luck you can get them 1/2 price on older models.
    Yup was just going to say this. Keep an eye out and you can get some pretty good deals. I was able to pick up a pair of Freerider VXi for $70 to my door, they are great shoes just a bit clunky to me (but then again they are more freerider type shoes so a bit heavier). Been running some Xpedo Spry and while nice and light they bust pins out like once every few rides. Wife got me a set of DMR Vaults for Christmas and FIL got me some Adidas Terrex SL Trail to go along with them. The Adidas are awesome so far, just waiting on the DMRs to get here.

    If you are looking for a cheap, good set of starter pedals, like many have said you can't go wrong with Chesters.

  28. #28
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    agreed, shoes are very important. 5 10 shoes get all the love. im using reg Vans, like em a lot

  29. #29
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    Just echoing what a lot of wise people have said above -- the SHOES are the most important factor. There are very few "bad" platform pedals on the market anymore. For the most part, they're thin, light, and grippy across the board. I've been riding flats for around 20 years now, and some of the old ones like the Primos I used to have were absolutely terrible. They weighed about a pound each and had zero grip when things got wet and muddy. Most of these new platforms are a dream.

    My favorite pedals ever are my Twenty6 pedals, but sadly they're not made anymore, and mine are getting pretty worn out. They're brutally spikey, but I have NEVER slipped off of them, thanks to my 5 10 freeride shoes. They stick to them like glue. In fact, I can practically pull UP without breaking contact.

    I used to use Vans skate shoes, which had great grip, but almost no protection in a crash due to having almost no support in the sole. I had to dismount quickly in Moab one time on a climb because I stalled out on a steep section of slickrock. When I put my foot down (wearing Vans), my heel landed on a sharpish rock and it bruised the fascia. I had intense heel pain for almost a year. The 5 10s I have now have a much thicker sole which is nicer for walking and I feel better about bailing in them.

    Finally, welcome to platform pedal riding! I've found that I'm just as fast climbing with flats as I am with clipless. And it's not a technique thing.
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  30. #30
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    Odyssey Twisted Pro are good and only $20. Theyre light weight and dont make me bleed like metal pins do. I also use a spacer to push my pedals out wider because of my big feet. With proper technique I rarely get pedal strikes.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by titusquasi View Post
    Pedaling Innovations Catalyst

    Found a pedal for life. These things are awesome and do just what the company says they'll do.
    They are good flat pedals for pedaling, but not so good for jumps and drops for me.
    If you're switching to flats for technical riding, beware the midfoot placement of these pedals when trying to drop your heels.

  32. #32
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    I have been off and on for a few years. Honestly with a good pair of shoes that matches up well on the flats, you should be happy. I have gone for thinner pedals as the offer more pedal clearance and a lower center of gravity. That's a win win.

    To me the hardest part is finding shoes that will happily work with the pedals. Although I would say 5.10 if it fits (I have wide feet, and struggle with shoes in general) is a good if not best pair. For me I found (the hard way) they run a little small.

  33. #33
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    Great, thanks all. Seems like there's some personal preference. I may look to just spend under $50 initially (like the Chesters) and then assuming I decide to stay with flats switch to something higher end if needed and get some 5 10s.

    How often do you guys get bloodied shins? I don't donating some blood to the trail, but wondering if it would be worthwhile picking up some shin guards too. Maybe I'll just go long socks initially to see how often I take strikes to the shins

  34. #34
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    I do it more walking my bike, than riding it! I just jinxed! myself..but!

    I'm using VP Vice, they can be brutal, the Chesters might be kinder.

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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmefly View Post
    Those look really nice.

    I've run DMR Vaults and RF Atlas pedals. Quite a different feel on each, but both felt great. The RF bearings died an early death, but have been easy to replace.

    Cold weather riding goes better with plastic flats. I'm on the DMRs but wouldn't mind trying the One Ups.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    How often do you guys get bloodied shins? I don't donating some blood to the trail, but wondering if it would be worthwhile picking up some shin guards too. Maybe I'll just go long socks initially to see how often I take strikes to the shins
    From riding? Never. Absolutely never. Occasionally while pushing my bike up something steep I'll get a scratch or two from the pedals. I wear knee pads only-- no shin guards anymore.

    With 5 10s and spikey pedals like mine, it is basically impossible to slip off the pedals. Sometimes I actually wish for LESS grip because I can't twist my foot to reposition it.

  37. #37
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    Another vote for TMACs. Thin, light, grippy and buttery smooth. Damn sexy as well.

  38. #38
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    +1 for One Up. Ive been riding mine for 6 months. They are thin, light, with very agressive pins and a HUGE platform. Seriously, you cant miss them. They have been reliable so far too: spin smooth with no crunchiness in the bearings and no free play in the spindle.

  39. #39
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    I ride with the Shimano Saint MX80 flat pedals and a pair of Five Ten Freerider Shoes. Just had to remove the pin spacers on the Shimano's to get the pins at their tallest height. Great combo...

  40. #40
    WillWorkForTrail
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    How often do you guys get bloodied shins?
    Never. At least not from pedals. I do hang a greenbrier in the trail every so often, and those things will take a chunk out. But from pedals? It just doesn't happen.

  41. #41
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    I have Shimano Saints on one bike, and RaceFace Chesters on the other, both work great with my cheap Sketchers Vigor 2.0 shoes.

    As far as my shins, sometimes, but usually in the parking lot loading or unloading my bike, occasionally doing stupid parking lot tricks. I have hit my shins enough that when it is not too hot out, I wear knee/shin guards.

  42. #42
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    I come from BMX roots so I have never ridden clipped in/or clipless, always flats, dont't ride road bikes so no need to be locked in. Like others have said there is a fine line between grip/durability/weight and cost. My favorite are these, some will say they are a little heavy at 500g like the Shimano Saints, but good luck breaking them, bomb proof pedals in my experience, especially strong for big heavy riders who like to catch air....

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  43. #43
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    Raceface Chesters. Really hold up. My son and I both use them.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    How often do you guys get bloodied shins? I don't donating some blood to the trail, but wondering if it would be worthwhile picking up some shin guards too. Maybe I'll just go long socks initially to see how often I take strikes to the shins
    If you look at a bunch of pedals you'll see different pins. Some are short and stubby kinda fat. Some are short and rounded and some are long and not rounded which can give you a sharper edge. The long skinny sharper ones work with 5.10s and would be the most likely to cut you up. But for dh and jumping you may want that much holding. The short stubby or short rounded work fine with running or trail shoes with some open tread. And they won't cut you up
    Like these-
    https://shop.bushtukah.com/product/w...m#.WkjtwbpFzb0

    Flat Pedal Recommendations (after 10+ years of clipless)-wellgo-mg6-mg-6-mg-6-bike-pedals-mtb-bmx-dh-magnesium-pedals-sealed-bearing-cycling1.jpg

    If you keep your heals low to create an angle and get off the saddle to put weight on your feet when going over things you can't be bounced off.

    Or these MG-5s off ebay for $40.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Wellgo-MG-5...r=572084072967

  45. #45
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    I decided to go with Pedal Innovations. I think they have a 30 day money back policy, but I'm guessing I'll like them. The majority of trails by me are XC so if their marketing theory is accurate (some reviews agreed with it) it may help with endurance too. We'll see.

  46. #46
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    I ride RF Chester's with 510's on my Enduro. Bare in mind I ride very, very aggressive. The combo sticks well. I get bloody shins often, but comes with my style of riding. It does take some mental adjustments if you're used to clipping in.

    I ride road clipped in daily, race CX clipped, and my XC bike clipped. Once you get used to it, changing back and forth is easy.

  47. #47
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    Race face chester are a great value combined with good grip

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    ...How often do you guys get bloodied shins? ...
    Lately, after 2+ years of riding flats, seldom. It was a steep and bloody learning curve though, and I have the scars to prove it. I remember walking around in shorts in the summer and people wondering "wtf happened to you?" I would tell them I got attacked by a pack of feral Chihuahuas.
    Do the math.

  49. #49
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    flats+++

    reasonable$$$ & fit very well. Nashbar Verge Platform Pedals - Nashbar made by???Flat Pedal Recommendations (after 10+ years of clipless)-71-tffmjexl._sl1500_.jpg

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by 02_NRS View Post
    reasonable$$$ & fit very well. Nashbar Verge Platform Pedals - Nashbar made by???Click image for larger version. 

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    I have been running these for about 6 months. They aren't bad at all, but I had an issue with the pins coming out. They are fine after removing the pins, adding Loctite, and reinstalling. With 5.10s there's almost too much grip anyway. I've been pretty happy with them.

  51. #51
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    Whatever brand, I recommend composite over metal as they slide over rocks easier, dont dent/bend and are generally less expensive.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post

    I'm guessing it makes sense to switch to flats?
    I'd say not necessarily. I've been riding 20 years XC on clipless like you. Switched to AM riding several years ago, tried flats. I feel better on clipless doing technical riding, jumps and especially big drops, Bikepark etc.
    ...love is the absence of fear....

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogdaysunrise View Post
    I'd say not necessarily. I've been riding 20 years XC on clipless like you. Switched to AM riding several years ago, tried flats. I feel better on clipless doing technical riding, jumps and especially big drops, Bikepark etc.
    I didn't catch that in his original post (TLR I guess).

    I agree. I love riding trail on flats, but that isn't the only way to ride. I know some only clip in, and others who race XC on flats.

  54. #54
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    I've always ridden flats and have been riding Nukeproof Neutrons for some time (3+ years) and have never had an issue. The URL is for the newer (2015) model. I've had the previous gen since 2013. They look very similar to the Race Face Chester but cost a little less and have Sealed cartridge bearings. Not the "best" flat but if you want to dabble with flats, these will get you going for less and keep you going for quite some time. I prefer nylon flats because I feel they can take more of a beating without getting destroyed like some metal pedals can.

    I ride them with both Teva Links and 510 Impact shoes. The Links stick good but you can still reposition your foot without having to lift it all the way off. The 510's stick like glue and you MUST lift your foot all the way off to reposition.

    Good luck!

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post

    How often do you guys get bloodied shins? I don't donating some blood to the trail, but wondering if it would be worthwhile picking up some shin guards too. Maybe I'll just go long socks initially to see how often I take strikes to the shins
    It happens and when it does a sock won't help, took it over 3 weeks to heal enough to where it wouldn't start bleeding once in awhile. Should have had stitches I guess. I wear shin guards now but haven't taken one since.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Flat Pedal Recommendations (after 10+ years of clipless)-20171002_144355.jpg  


  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    Great, thanks all. Seems like there's some personal preference. I may look to just spend under $50 initially (like the Chesters) and then assuming I decide to stay with flats switch to something higher end if needed and get some 5 10s.

    How often do you guys get bloodied shins? I don't donating some blood to the trail, but wondering if it would be worthwhile picking up some shin guards too. Maybe I'll just go long socks initially to see how often I take strikes to the shins
    Good pedals and shoes keep my feet from slipping off and I've gotten to where when I need to get my feet on the ground I'm able to do so and stay away from the pedals. Really the only time I scrape my legs on the pedals are when I'm already off the bike and not paying attention while walking the bike.

    Check out the Oneup composite pedals if you're looking at the Chesters. I have both and the Oneup have a larger platform. The Chesters are too small for size 13 shoes imo.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Good pedals and shoes keep my feet from slipping off and I've gotten to where when I need to get my feet on the ground I'm able to do so and stay away from the pedals. Really the only time I scrape my legs on the pedals are when I'm already off the bike and not paying attention while walking the bike.
    Yeah I was on Atlas pedals and 5/10's and wasn't paying attention and had my foot too far forward on my pedal while slow rolling a jump line and hit a lip that was a little lippy-er than I thought and caught me off guard. Those pins are so sharp I didn't even know I did it till I got down to the bottom

    I also get the occasional pedal to the back of the leg while walking as well.

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    I would add if you are mainly trail riding and not leaving the ground, you should be good. But if you are doing more and leaving the ground, shin guards are not a bad idea.

  59. #59
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    My worst pedal carnage ever occurred while checking the sag on my fork...in slippers. #trueStory

    I did exactly one ride on clipless last year after riding clipless almost exclusively in prior years. It took me a little while to get perfectly comfortable on flats and a bit longer to feel in total control. Now I don't know if I'm going to switch back. I think it's worth it to at least be competent on flat pedals. Ultimately, it will help with technique overall.

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    If you are concerned about your shins, and you should be , Just invest in a decent pair of shin guards. I ride with 661 Riot shin guards. I don't think they make them any longer but you get the idea. The $40 - $50 and sweat is well worth saving your shins, IMO.
    Last edited by IamDefiler; 01-03-2018 at 09:37 AM.

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    My XC bikes, commuters, and Fat bike all have clipless because they are faster and more efficient for me.

    On my AM bike I have Spank Spikes with 5-10's. They are a good combo and fun. As stated earlier, the Spank Oozy is the lighter updated pedal. I do find myself pedal striking more with these, and it has sent me OTB a couple times. I like mixing it up between the clips and flats, it works the muscles differently and gives me a different workout.

    When I first wanted to try flats I got some cheap shoes (Van's style, but even cheaper). and I customized some of my old aluminum Wellgo pedals. They didn't work great, but it gave me the confidence to purchase a good setup.

    Flat Pedal Recommendations (after 10+ years of clipless)-pedals.jpg

  62. #62
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    HT PEDALS!!!!! Best flat hands down. Yes, they are expensive, but don't ride on cheap pedals. They're about $100 new on pinkbike

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    Yeah, if you are looking for the best of the best in flats, look to the Spank Spike/Oozy or the Canfield Crampon. I've tried tons of different flat pedals over the past couple of decades, and they are kind of in a league of their own. Same with shoes, 5.10 has done a great job with their shoes.

    There's some pretty decent pedals out there if you cannot afford the Spanks, but there will be some sort of compromise somewhere compared to the "upper tier" pedals.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    HT PEDALS!!!!! Best flat hands down. Yes, they are expensive, but don't ride on cheap pedals. They're about $100 new on pinkbike
    Which model? They have nylon pedals too that look exactly like ones some of us have suggested in this thread.

  65. #65
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    I have the Aeo3 and meo3. Ive ridden them all, get the HT. There is a guy selling the Meo3 on Pinkbike for 60 in as new condition. Those are 175 pedals. Super thin and super strong.s

  66. #66
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    Got a set of DMR Vault and Adidas Terrex Trail Cross SL for Christmas. The Vaults just got here last night. Have a couple of rides on the Adidas with my current Xpedo Spry and just felt weird, you could feel the lugs of the Spry slip around inbetween the lugs on the shoes. Put the Vaults on last night and the traction difference is Night and Day. You put your foot anywhere and they just STICK! No wonder most reviews rate the Vaults as one of the top pedals with some of the best traction.

    Hopefully, weather will hold out and I can get a full ride on the new setup.

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    Quote Originally Posted by titusquasi View Post
    Pedaling Innovations Catalyst

    Found a pedal for life. These things are awesome and do just what the company says they'll do.
    They are cool because they are very large, but they want your foot in the middle of the pedal. Imagine walking or jumping without using your ankle to absorb energy? Better yet, try to ride a horse like that. We were designed with ankles for a reason.
    Last edited by itsnotbroken; 01-05-2018 at 10:18 PM. Reason: forgot to quote original post

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsnotbroken View Post
    Better yet, try to ride a horse like that.
    You ride with your heels down, no suspension. At least in the more common western pleasure. Though, I prefer bareback.

  69. #69
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    Hard to beat the One-Up Composite, RF Chester, or Deity Compound for budget. Beware that pedals, similar to the MG-5 mentioned earlier, with the special made rounded top pins don't even have half the grip of the pins that resemble set screws (some actually are set screws).

    The cheaper pedals tend to click/squeak a little. I believe clicks come from loose ball bearings contacting each other, and squeaks come from your shoe rubbing on the axle (e.g. Spank Spike). Unless you ride a silent bike, it should be tolerable. On the luxury side, I'm glad that the TMacs are getting recognition, but there's 1 that seemingly stands above as ultimate: Syntace Number Nine Titan. I'd opt for the large version. I saw 'em on sale on eBay new for 176 and glad someone else got 'em, cause I might have...

    As far as pins tenderizing your shins, it will happen and there's nothing you can do besides planning your treatment of the wounds for minimal suffering.

    I already use a mid-foot position on my flat pedals. I haven't yet trained myself to do heels down. I'm still stuck building muscle memory with other techniques, such as finding the sweet centered spot and riding loose, figuring out proper posture to engage my core for everything.
    Last edited by Varaxis; 01-06-2018 at 02:14 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsnotbroken View Post
    They are cool because they are very large, but they want your foot in the middle of the pedal. Imagine walking or jumping without using your ankle to absorb energy? Better yet, try to ride a horse like that. We were designed with ankles for a reason.
    I thought the same thing initially. Think about it this way..when you do squats or leg presses you are using the same mid foot position. Also this foot position recruits more muscle groups (specifically more hamstrings/glutes) and isolates the quads a little less. Also good for people with big flat feet, plantar fasciitis, knee pain, ankle pain, and for people who had a herniated disc that took out their quad and hip flexors (ask me how I know, lol).
    Also nothing to lose by trying them....

  71. #71
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    I don't buy the Catalyst pitch (I'm generally not a James Wilson fan, as far as riding is concerned). The pedals might be better for people with specific conditions, but I want to spring from the balls of my feet. No one explodes into the air from their arch. I'd try them just to see what they are like, but on someone else's bike. I wouldn't pay any money for them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by titusquasi View Post
    Pedaling Innovations Catalyst

    Found a pedal for life. These things are awesome and do just what the company says they'll do.
    Best pedals I've ever had.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    You ride with your heels down, no suspension. At least in the more common western pleasure. Though, I prefer bareback.
    I think we're in agreement, you would never put the stirrups in the middle of your foot. I don't want my pedal there either.

  74. #74
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    I do feel that Catalysts let you put more power down, but that midfoot placement is not reassuring for drops and jumps.

  75. #75
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    Mag Lock Pedals?

    I have been curious about these, but I haven't seen anyone running them yet.
    MagLock magnetic pedals review - Mtbr.com

    The magnet eliminates needing to "click" in. I'm thinking they would be good for my wife so she doesn't have to learn how to click in.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Flat Pedal Recommendations (after 10+ years of clipless)-6-qr_pedals-e1472181207277.jpg  


  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsnotbroken View Post
    I have been curious about these, but I haven't seen anyone running them yet.
    MagLock magnetic pedals review - Mtbr.com

    The magnet eliminates needing to "click" in. I'm thinking they would be good for my wife so she doesn't have to learn how to click in.
    Not exactly a glowing review. Those pedals seem sketchy and unpredictable. Not features I look for in a pedal. A pair of 5.10s and flats seems like a way better option.

  77. #77
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    They maybe good for triggering green light for road bikes at intersections.

  78. #78
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    I used these with 5-10s when I was recovering from a broken ankle:



    I am using XTR clip-in trail pedals now.

    I also used 420s, but these are wider which helps if you have size 12 shoes.

  79. #79
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    Chromag Scarab

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsnotbroken View Post
    but they want your foot in the middle of the pedal.
    Exactly where your foot should be.

  81. #81
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    I tried the foot in the middle of the pedal for a day or so (on my road/gravel bike).

    I have large feet, flexible flat feet, a previous broken ankle, etc, so one would think going whole Hogg on this would be a natural thing to do.

    It was fine until I tried to climb a hill. 25+ years of conventional, SPD-cleat-reinforced positioning is a difficult thing to change, and I had no strength for climbing, and the pain was far more intense than the small amount of foot discomfort that I was trying to address.

  82. #82
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    bit feet need big pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
    I tried the foot in the middle of the pedal for a day or so (on my road/gravel bike).

    I have large feet, flexible flat feet, a previous broken ankle, etc, so one would think going whole Hogg on this would be a natural thing to do.

    It was fine until I tried to climb a hill. 25+ years of conventional, SPD-cleat-reinforced positioning is a difficult thing to change, and I had no strength for climbing, and the pain was far more intense than the small amount of foot discomfort that I was trying to address.
    Sir,

    My feet are 8-1/2 and I can kind of mimmick the catalyst pedal on my spz bennies (4inches long). The catalysts are almost 6inches long and there my feet stay really planted. You cant try mid foot position without support it will not work. Also, the midfoot position comes with saddle adjustment as well. you will drop your saddle more than an Inch to get there propper mid foot position. maybe you will get your saddle forward as well. These instructions come with the pedals in a letter from the manufacturer. Its a package and involves the mind as well. If youre not in the mood of being convinced and is fine with ball of the foot positioning, dont even try you will hate. Its the same as asking me to try a 29er. I will always find something I disliked. They have a moneyback guarantee so if you live in the US it will not be an issue to give it a try. I bought one for me and my wife stole it.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by edmodasvirgens View Post
    Sir,

    My feet are 8-1/2
    Mine are 12.

    Quote Originally Posted by edmodasvirgens View Post
    and I can kind of mimmick the catalyst pedal on my spz bennies (4inches long). The catalysts are almost 6inches long and there my feet stay really planted. You cant try mid foot position without support it will not work. Also, the midfoot position comes with saddle adjustment as well. you will drop your saddle more than an Inch to get there propper mid foot position. maybe you will get your saddle forward as well. These instructions come with the pedals in a letter from the manufacturer. Its a package and involves the mind as well. If youre not in the mood of being convinced and is fine with ball of the foot positioning, dont even try you will hate. Its the same as asking me to try a 29er. I will always find something I disliked. They have a moneyback guarantee so if you live in the US it will not be an issue to give it a try. I bought one for me and my wife stole it.
    Mine was done by a fitter, with the lowered saddle, etc. I am pretty sure he set it up right. I just couldn't adjust.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    Got a set of DMR Vault and Adidas Terrex Trail Cross SL for Christmas. The Vaults just got here last night. Have a couple of rides on the Adidas with my current Xpedo Spry and just felt weird, you could feel the lugs of the Spry slip around inbetween the lugs on the shoes. Put the Vaults on last night and the traction difference is Night and Day. You put your foot anywhere and they just STICK! No wonder most reviews rate the Vaults as one of the top pedals with some of the best traction.

    Hopefully, weather will hold out and I can get a full ride on the new setup.
    What a great Christmas present! That was my exact setup until I decided to give the Shimano GR9 shoes a try. Really liking the Shimano shoes so far, especially the Velcro lace cover and the flatter (as compared to the Adidas) sole. That said, Terrex is still my favorite flat pedal shoe, but more time on the Shimano might change that. The DMR Vaults, however, are currently in a very clear first place for my favorite flat pedals. So grippy, so solid.


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    DMR Vaults. (Not the plastic ones). I've used them for about 3 years now. No problems, and I never think about where my feet are. Wide and light. They install with an Allen Wrench. Good looking, too. Ribble carries them.

    https://www.dmrbikes.com/Catalogue/Pedals/Vault-2/Vault
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    Chesters and 510s here
    Budget Bike Riders - Facebook group

  88. #88
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    First full ride on the Vaults and Adidas and have to say that I am completely impressed with this setup. I am sure that the Vault would stick to just about anything but damn these are awesome!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I've been riding XC for about 15 years and pretty much always clipped in. But I'm now getting into more AM trails and jumps that have recently been added to my area.

    I'm guessing it makes sense to switch to flats? I tried my cheap plastic flats today and some things felt surprisingly good - technical climbs, bike control. My jumps sucked and were small and sketchy but I started to get a better feel for keeping my feet on the pedals as the ride went on.

    Anyway, what are some flats I should start with? Also are specific MTB shoes very helpful too, or are typical athletic shoes fine to start?
    The shoes are as important as the pedals...I broke my big toe wearing Vans. 5-10 makes some great, affordable shoes.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Plus 1 on those!
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    Flat Pedal Recommendations (after 10+ years of clipless)

    I just ordered dmr vault pedals and five-10s. I tried my vans with my current pedals and hey sucked horribly...running shoes were better than my vans


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  92. #92
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    Although I concur about toe injuries wearing Vans, they stick well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gtsum2 View Post
    I just ordered dmr vault pedals and five-10s. I tried my vans with my current pedals and hey sucked horribly...running shoes were better than my vans
    Waffle sole? I'm guessing no?

    Adidas Terrix Trail and five ten are worlds better but at one time I used Vans with gum colored waffle sole and they gripped pretty well.
    Outside that specific sole design though, yes, they suck royally on pedals.

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    Flat Pedal Recommendations (after 10+ years of clipless)

    Im not even sure what sole is on there?? I was still surprised how bad they were. Looking forward to trying the vaunted five -10s and seeing what all the fuss is about


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    Gum waffle sole is the only way to rock Vans.

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    Race Face Chesters for me - good size on the footprint and my feet don't move.

    I pick up a set of the new Kona Wah Wah II pedals for the wife as a Christmas present and so far, she is a big fan of them. The footprint is slightly longer and wider than my Chesters while also being slightly thinner.

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    I have size 12 feet and I really like my large Crank brothers Stamp. As someone said above, shoes are just as important. I wear 5.10 freerider pro and love them. Super comfortable off the bike as well.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarnGood View Post
    Chesters and 510s here
    Dito i have them on both my bikes

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    One thing about flats is that they tend to be wider (stick out further from the crank) than clipless, thus increasing a tendency to hit the pedal on things if the bike is leaned over, because they're closer to the ground, important if you're pouring the coal on coming around a turn. One thing that's been helpful to me is running the thinnest flats I can find. To date, my favorite because:

    1) It's thin. One of the thinest I've seen.
    2) Grip is good. Not the best. But better than some. I've not slipped one in 5:10s.
    3) Weight - I'm not a weight weenie, but I don't like to carry around more than I need for reliability. These are some of the lightest pedals I've seen, and I got 3.5 years out of my first set of them. That's good enough.
    4) Reliability - see 3.
    5) Price. You can get some plastic pedals for less, but for a thin pedal, that's light and reliable, you won't touch the price on these.

    Xpedo Spry.
    Yeah, thin, light and reasonably priced. They take a beating about as well as any other pedal. I wish they were a smidge bigger but they are not small. I've been running them for 3 years now.

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    I'm in the same boat as you. Been in clips for prob 15 years but decided to move to flats to practice manual>bunny hop>jump. So far so good! Definitely a big change in foot position - the pedal won't lift with your foot unless you lock it in with foot angle. I did some research on pedals and settled in on these as high quality.

    Pedals: Nukeproof Horizon Pro
    Shoes: FiveTen Freerider Contact

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