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Thread: First good MTB!

  1. #1
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    First good MTB!

    I just bought a Trek 6000 and so far I love it. I'm getting back into riding after about 15 years and am way out of shape. I've been riding on the road for about 2 weeks and am up to 4.5 miles a day. Is this enough to get onto the trails or should I be in better shape to have any fun.


  2. #2
    local trails rider
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    Trails are more fun than road.

    4.5 miles is not much but spend the same time on some easy trails: you will have more fun.

  3. #3
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    Welcome back to the sport and the forum!
    Go ahead on the trails, just remeber that a mile on the street is usually easier than a mile on the dirt.
    Well, I was just riding along when...

  4. #4
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    Just go ride some trails. Who cares how many miles you can ride on the road, because once you get on the trail all worry about distance and time will fade away into complete and total bliss

    Enjoy the new bike!
    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live. ~Mark Twain

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    Is there anything I absolutely have to get to hit the trails? I know clipless pedals and shoes will help according to a friend but as long as I have a few allen wrenches and a pump I should be OK.

  6. #6
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dawn Rider
    ...I know clipless pedals and shoes will help according to a friend but as long as I have a few allen wrenches and a pump I should be OK.
    Clipless is good for more power and stability over rough ground. It is not compulsory

    People get thirsty when riding. I carried bottles in a back pack for a couple of years before upgrading to a Camelback system.

    If you go further than you are willing to push the bike back, you need some tools and a way to fix a flat. Some metric hex keys go a long way but a biking multitool is handy for keeping "everything" with you. To fix a flat it is best to have a spare inner tube, pump, tyre levers (plastic), and a patch kit (just in case you have more than one flat)... and some idea of how to use them.

    edit: surely you already have a helmet and gloves?

  7. #7
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dawn Rider
    Is there anything I absolutely have to get to hit the trails? I know clipless pedals and shoes will help according to a friend but as long as I have a few allen wrenches and a pump I should be OK.
    Dont worry about pedals yet just go out & ride enjoying the trails & country without thought of milage.

    Suggest a CamelBack, tire levers, tube, mini pump, Clif Bar & Gell or a PayDay bar, multi tool should be a good start. Learning how to fix a flat is important, you may never have to but if the time comes your at least prepaired, who knows you may end up rescuing somone else & be the hero.

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/bikemap.asp
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  8. #8
    thats right living legend
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    At 4.5 miles on the rode you WILL NOT be in the kinda shape it takes to really have a great time. Just remember stick with it... it get's funner the more fit you become.


    Bike looks great BTW.

  9. #9
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    Excellent advice

    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Dont worry about pedals yet just go out & ride enjoying the trails & country without thought of milage.

    Suggest a CamelBack, tire levers, tube, mini pump, Clif Bar & Gell or a PayDay bar, multi tool should be a good start. Learning how to fix a flat is important....

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/bikemap.asp
    Ditto that

  10. #10
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    yup already have gloves but I need a helmet. That was actually my next question. Do I need a full shell helmet like a skateboard helmet or is a standard bike helmet O.K.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dawn Rider
    yup already have gloves but I need a helmet. That was actually my next question. Do I need a full shell helmet like a skateboard helmet or is a standard bike helmet O.K.
    Good quality XC helmet is fine, buy from your LBS to get a good fit. The LBS that sold you the bike should be able to give you a deal since they should have tryed to sell you one anyway.
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  12. #12
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    The LBS that I bought from was not at all helpful. I pretty much had to pick out my bike myself and ask any questions that I thought of. The only reason that I got the bike there is because I couldn't find the 6000 in my size. They are harder to find now that the 08's are getting ready to come out. Thanks all for the advise. I'm hooked and I'll be sticking around.

  13. #13
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dawn Rider
    skateboard helmet or is a standard bike helmet O.K.
    A skateboard helmet may offer more protection to the back of the head but a "bike helmet" has much better ventilation to keep you comfortable when you get hot.

    I will not recommend a brand or model because heads are different. A helmet must conform to a relevant safety standard and it must fit your head. You need to be able to adjust it so that it stays on snugly and is also comfortable. Wind tunnel testing, carbon fiber, and lowest weight are options for those who can afford them. If the only helmet that fits is marketed for road use, buy it anyway.

  14. #14
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    Get yourself a good helmet,some water and hit the trails, take it easy challenge yourself a little more every time and you will get better, and more important...have fun

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    A skateboard helmet may offer more protection to the back of the head but a "bike helmet" has much better ventilation to keep you comfortable when you get hot.

    I will not recommend a brand or model because heads are different. A helmet must conform to a relevant safety standard and it must fit your head. You need to be able to adjust it so that it stays on snugly and is also comfortable. Wind tunnel testing, carbon fiber, and lowest weight are options for those who can afford them. If the only helmet that fits is marketed for road use, buy it anyway.
    Word

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  16. #16
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    also pick up a trial guide for your area.
    falcon, and off the beaten track are the two i know. that will give you ideas on difficulty, distance, and location.
    oh, and i never go into the woods with out a map, too.

  17. #17
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    [QUOTE=Dawn Rider]I just bought a Trek 6000 and so far I love it. I'm getting back into riding after about 15 years and am way out of shape. I've been riding on the road for about 2 weeks and am up to 4.5 miles a day. Is this enough to get onto the trails or should I be in better shape to have any fun.

    Having fun riding is most important and what will keep you doing it. Its better than a gym membership for me. Most of my rides are in the 4 to 6 mile range; after work when I don't have alot of time. I ride mostly dirt trails as it's more excercise per mile and the technical trails keep me focused and are therefor more entertaining. I would recommend clipless pedals as I cannot imagine riding anyother way.
    Ride hard, Drag the broken pieces back, Share lusty tales of adventure & Tell everyone, " I almost stuck the landing".

  18. #18
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    Off-road riding will be a lot harder, but as mentioned here it is also much more fun as there is a lot more going on. Find yourself an easy rated 7-8 mile trail in your area and go for it, even better find a friend to show you the way, take it easy and just enjoy. That way you should be able to assess how easy / hard it was and work on improving. First and foremost have fun

    My priority for kit would be:

    Helmet + gloves - already sorted.
    Puncture repair kit + levers + pump.
    Water vessel bottle or camelback type.

    After you have hit a few trails and "got the bug" think about a multi tool / hex kit and chain tool (they do break..) and a spare innertube for convenience and some basic first aid stuff if you ride a lot solo. Then yes, think about investing in a good pair of shoes + pedals if you like, but be forewarned, this is the downhill route to additional spending (forks next, new bike, new bikes... )
    Last edited by ajyoung; 07-12-2007 at 01:48 AM.

  19. #19
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    I only ride Easton flats with 661 Dually shoes.
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  20. #20
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    I say, just go out and ride. Everyone is right, road riding just isn't as fun as trails!

  21. #21
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    After a while, go SPD!

    I have just got into mtb'ing again after a long break. I'm 38 now and first started when I was 18. This was after spending my early teens on BMX. I'd say my skill level is pretty good. I find that the technique is just hard wired into my brain. It's just that my stamina needs to catch up.

    What I decided to do along with getting a new bike, was to kit myself out with some proper cycling gear for the first time. Man, what a difference!

    The helmet, (Bell Slant) fits so well I forget I'm wearing it. It's also really well ventilated. I got a pair of Shimano SPD pedals that are double sided and have a decent vinal cage for grip, useful if you un-clip for a more demanding section of trail. For me, the SPD pedals and shoes are an increadible upgrade. After a few weeks, I could not imagine cycling now with out them. They take a bit of getting used to and I am am not quite there yet, but they are awesome. I got Specialized Taho shoes and they are a superb fit.

    Make sure you have some nice comfortable cycling gear and once you build up some experience, go SPD. Highly recommended.

    Good luck.

    Andy

  22. #22
    ride hard take risks
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    After 8 years riding MTB on flats & also racing BMX cough cough 35+ years ago im sticking with my flatz.
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  23. #23
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    Start saving now for new bottom bracket and cranks.
    Trek 4300 2006
    M580 LX cranks
    11-34T Cassette
    Kool-stop pads
    El Notre 7075 Seatpost
    Laser V saddle

  24. #24
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    Originally Posted by ajyoung
    My priority for kit would be:

    Helmet + gloves - already sorted.
    Puncture repair kit + levers + pump.
    Water vessel bottle or camelback type.
    I second that, at first all you need is a backpack with a simple puncture repair kit, tire levers, some kind of pump and a bottle of water. Forget the clipless pedals, just ride out the platforms until you get better in the trails. You may actually like the security that you can hop off the platforms any time you feel nervous. Plus as an added bonus, your riding technique will actually improve between the hardtail and the platform pedals. Then when you know that you like trail riding, spring for pedals, shoes, stems, handlebars, brakes, whatever, but make sure you like the sport first.

    Errol

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