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  1. #1
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    Fezzari Nebo Peak - is it really all that and a bag of chips

    I was reading the reviews on this bike on the mtbr review section, and it is almost like a cult. The bike had NO weaknesses, and everyone loved it. 4.93 out of 5 is a pretty good rating. While it is pretty well spec'ed, I cannot help wondering if there is anything bad about this bike. For example, it's running the basic "faux bar" suspension (a la Kona and others), so you would think there would be some griping about brake jack and so on.

    Comments? Opinions? Any flaws? Warranty issues? Made with child labour?

    Seriously, if this bike is that good, it's what I will buy next.

  2. #2
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    No complaints with mine so far, have had it over a year. For the money, I don't think you can beat it. And their customer service is great. I have called a few times with questions and suggestions and they have been very friendly and helpful.

  3. #3
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    These reviews are always hard to decipher but I like my Nebo. The suspension is smooth and it holds up really well. I have been beating mine up for about 18 months now - just when the new design came out. The faux bar works pretty well with the pivot close to the middle ring chainline. I really don't feel any pedal feedback or brake jack. It is pretty neutral. I have had no issues with the pivots but I do ride in the high desert (Utah) so it's pretty easy on seals around here.

    The bike is relatively light for a 6" travel and climbs pretty well though it is no XC racer. Where I really like it is when you turn downhill. The bike tracks really good and it has good quality travel (i.e. you get to use all of it). I have taken it to the dirt jumps a bit as well and it flies straight and hold up. I am not much of a dirt jumper but it works me.

    I don't really have anything bad to say about it and you can't beat the price. I love mine.

  4. #4
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    I love my Nebo Peak. It has been and amazing climber and it is even more fun coming down. I came from the downhill/freeride stuff and have been getting more into the XC stuff as I have become older and the Nebo has done the trick for me. I am a bigger guy (6'4'' 210lbs) and the stock wheels are good but I prefer something a little stiffer so I upgraded my wheels to the Mavic Crossmax ST, but other than that the bike is completely stock and I haven't had any issues with it besides the regular maintanance. Also the sealaed bearings on the frame are nice. My last bike (Rocky Mountain) had bushings and the rear triangle got sloppy on me pretty quick. I've had my Nebo for almost a year and it's as smooth as the day I bought it. I'd say go for it, it's a sweet bike!

  5. #5
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    I've had my nebo since december and I don't have any weaknesses to report. I really like it. The rp23 probably improves the preformance of the rear suspension linkage. I upgraded the rear cassette and cranks when I purchased it and added a carbon bar, easton seatpost, and Easton Haven wheels running tubeless. I probably dropped a couple pounds off the bike. Mine should be in the 27lb range. My only minor gripe is that there is no room for a water bottle and hence no bolts for a cage in the triangle. I always wear a backpack anyway, but it would be nice to have the option. On the flipside the standover height is great and that's a bonus. The true test will be when I take it to Downieville in a couple weeks. I'll put it through the ringer and see how it hangs! I'll be blowing through all 6" a few times down that trail!

  6. #6
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    So you guys are happy with yours?

    I live near them and might get one.

    It has enough travel for some mild-dh stuff?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikedreamer
    I was reading the reviews on this bike on the mtbr review section, and it is almost like a cult. The bike had NO weaknesses, and everyone loved it. 4.93 out of 5 is a pretty good rating. While it is pretty well spec'ed, I cannot help wondering if there is anything bad about this bike. For example, it's running the basic "faux bar" suspension (a la Kona and others), so you would think there would be some griping about brake jack and so on.

    Comments? Opinions? Any flaws? Warranty issues? Made with child labour?

    Seriously, if this bike is that good, it's what I will buy next.
    Haven't ridden one myself but since it seems the cult's on too you and is following this thread. From a bystanders perspective let's give it a -1 for the name Fezzari (sounds like someone took the name ferrari and mixed it with the stupid utah tradition of spelling everything with double z's).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtwhip
    Haven't ridden one myself but since it seems the cult's on too you and is following this thread. From a bystanders perspective let's give it a -1 for the name Fezzari (sounds like someone took the name ferrari and mixed it with the stupid utah tradition of spelling everything with double z's).
    I can see what you are saying, dirtwhip. I'll see what the word on them is next year, after doing more intensive research. Maybe the bikes haven't been out long enough to have problems of any kind. Or maybe they are really fantastic.

  9. #9
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    any bike that is a good deal has inflated reviews.

    it looks like theres nothing special about the bikes at all, but thats not necessarily a bad thing. a good basic frame that doesnt upsell you gimmicks saves you a ton of money and a lot of times really rides pretty good. some people want the latest and greatest acronyms and "technology" and some people just want to ride a fun bike. i think the fezzaris are for the latter group.

  10. #10
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    I ran into the same thing with Canfield...seems everyone who owns one and posts here, loves it to death. I finally ordered a ONE despite the great reviews and surprise, surprise, the hype is correct.
    Unless you've tried one I can pretty much guarantee you've never seen a softer, mushier suspension yet it wont bottom and has absolutely no pedal bob no matter what. Pretty awesome for a 7.5" travel suspension
    So obviously there are some great bikes out there ...not really a surprise when you figure millions of bikers and less than 600 Canfields for example, probably the same with lots of small production bikes that just dont get the press exposure.
    2011 Canfield ONE 200mm DH 35 pounds
    2010 Specialized Pitch 100% non stock 29 lbs
    Wife: 2009 Canfield ONE also 29 lbs

  11. #11
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    I've been riding a Fezzari Nebo Peak for about two months now and I love the bike. It makes the Gary Fisher Tassajara I was riding seem like a Wal-Mart bike. The Nebo components are comparable to a Trek EX9 but the Nebo costs about $800 less. I did an internet price comparison of the forks, rear dérailleurs, rear shocks and rear cassettes between the Trek EX8 and the Nebo, which are very close in retail price, and the Fezzari components were 45% more expensive than the EX8's if bought separately. That says it all really. 45% more expensive components for the same overall price. Fezzari sells direct so you save the money the bike shop would have made.

    The Nebo has 6" travel with an adjustment to drop to 5" or 4" travel up front if you want. I've never needed or wanted to drop the travel though. If I'm climbing a long hill I just lockout the front.

    The Nebo comes in around 30 lbs which is very respectable for a 6" travel bike.

    The frame has sealed bearings at all the pivots which MOST other brands do not. That's a big selling point to me. You won't have to worry about the pivot points squeaking or getting sloppy over time. Don't underestimate how much better this is in the long run.

    You DO get mounting holes for a water bottle on 19" and 21" frame sizes. Smaller frames don't have room for a water bottle.

    I was a little concerned about buying a bike site unseen because I was worried about the fit but Fezzari shows you how to measure all the relevant body dimensions so they can set the bike up specifically for your body size and proportions. The Nebo fit me so much better than a Gary Fisher Tassajara I bought from a shop. The shop just sold it to me as-is with no consideration for fit other than me sitting on it and it felt okay. I wasn't sure what it was supposed to feel like when I bought the bike and the shop didn't do any measurements nor did they offer to change the bar rise, steering neck, shims, seat position or shock pressures to match my body. The Fezzari fit perfectly. They pick the frame size and component sizes and set shock settings based on the information you provide them. I think your chances of getting the right fit are better with Fezzari than with a local shop. I can say they did a better job for me for sure.

    I've ridden this bike hard all year including jumps and a lot of rocks, drops and roots, including a bunch of crashes and everything is still working like it did on the first ride. All I've had to do is clean it after each ride and oil the chain.

    Customer service was great and I'd have no worries about these guys supporting me if I needed something. They answered my questions very promptly the two times I asked.

    I only have the GF Tassajara to compare to (a $1000 hardtail) so I can't give a great comparison review but if there were any apparent weaknesses I'd post them up. So far the bike has performed flawlessly and my confidence has doubled compared to riding the GF hardtail with an anemic front fork.

  12. #12
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    tshulthise: I see you are a bit shy about writing. That's okay - give it some time, and soon you will be writing multipage essays about bikes.

    Seriously, though, thanks for the input.

  13. #13
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    Nebo peak

    Bought a Nebo Peak three years ago. The shock, fork, and most of the components have held up well. The frame wore out on the bottom pivot point and Fezzari warranty does not cover that. I have been completely unimpressed by their customer service. They never answer emails. Their replacement parts are expensive and often don't fit and they take forever to ship. Next time I'm getting a Specialized.

  14. #14
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    I've found there customer service (over the past year that I've had my Nebo) and prices for parts excellent and I'm not easy to please. Last year I tore up a wheel and I got one from them very quickly for a good price. I recently stripped a crank pedal thread and they took care of it right away. I needed the tools to replace the rear cassette ant that was taken care or fast and easy too. They've spent a lot of time with me on the phone answering mt questions about the bike.

  15. #15
    usually cranky
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    fezzari has always been a little cultish for me. but some people love them. as long as they're biking.

  16. #16
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    How about some comparisons to other bikes! Have any of you owned (not ridden once!) Respected bikes like a Nomad, Enduro, Rune, RFX- How do they measure up? If it doesn't have a fox 36 or Lyric, it makes me think the bike is leans towards trail riding than aggressive AM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haus Boss
    ... If it doesn't have a fox 36 or Lyric, it makes me think the bike is leans towards trail riding than aggressive AM.
    I have to ask exactly how aggressive you are getting that you need a fork with 36 mm stanchions? I'm running a Marz AM 1 (130 mm travel, 32 mm stanchions, 9 mm axle) and it has survived my sometimes less than skilled DH riding at Whistler and Panorama, not to mention the local Canadian Shield trails. If you are delving more into FR or DH, then I see where you are coming from.

    P.S. - not endorsing or defending Fezzi in any way - just curious about your definition of aggressive AM.

    Cheers!

  18. #18
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikedreamer
    I have to ask exactly how aggressive you are getting that you need a fork with 36 mm stanchions? I'm running a Marz AM 1 (130 mm travel, 32 mm stanchions, 9 mm axle) and it has survived my sometimes less than skilled DH riding at Whistler and Panorama, not to mention the local Canadian Shield trails. If you are delving more into FR or DH, then I see where you are coming from.

    P.S. - not endorsing or defending Fezzi in any way - just curious about your definition of aggressive AM.

    Cheers!
    bigger stanctions arnt about durability as much as stiffness. they will track better and not be as flexy (for some riders, im small enough where it doesnt matter for me but my bike came with a 55 so thats what i run). plus the trend in am bikes is a 160mm fork, im not aware of a 32mm fork that gets over 150mm of travel.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    bigger stanctions arnt about durability as much as stiffness. they will track better and not be as flexy (for some riders, im small enough where it doesnt matter for me but my bike came with a 55 so thats what i run). plus the trend in am bikes is a 160mm fork, im not aware of a 32mm fork that gets over 150mm of travel.
    Ah, now I see. Thanks, k-bul.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikedreamer
    I have to ask exactly how aggressive you are getting that you need a fork with 36 mm stanchions? I'm running a Marz AM 1 (130 mm travel, 32 mm stanchions, 9 mm axle) and it has survived my sometimes less than skilled DH riding at Whistler and Panorama, not to mention the local Canadian Shield trails. If you are delving more into FR or DH, then I see where you are coming from.

    P.S. - not endorsing or defending Fezzi in any way - just curious about your definition of aggressive AM.

    Cheers!
    Everyone has a different preference for riding style + their steeds. For me, my AM bike is really a mini DH rig that I can pedal to the top of the hill, and that's why I prefer a 35-36mm fork up front. They're stiffer, track better, and offer more than 150mm of travel.

    Again, I'd love to hear some Nebo owners compare the bike to some other brands/models.

  21. #21
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    I see it's 6k? I'd much rather buy a few 2,500 bikes if I'm going to break them.

  22. #22
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    Interesting knock off brand looks like a cheap frame with great components. A similar idea to a felt or motobecane. These days there are not many bikes that are truly horrible, not having ever ridden one I would predict a fairly run of the mill ride quality.
    Live to ride!

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  23. #23
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilycook
    Interesting knock off brand looks like a cheap frame with great components. A similar idea to a felt or motobecane. These days there are not many bikes that are truly horrible, not having ever ridden one I would predict a fairly run of the mill ride quality.
    felt

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    felt

    im thinking he meant sette. If not, there is gonna be alot of pissed off Felt owners when they find out their bikes are actually cheap knock offs and not expensive boutique bikes.
    -It's time to shred some mild to moderate gnar!!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haus Boss
    Again, I'd love to hear some Nebo owners compare the bike to some other brands/models.
    I own a Nebo but recently rode a Kona with the Magic-Link suspension while on vacation in Sedona AZ. I don't know the exact model of Kona it was but it had the RP-23 rear shock and the 2011 Talas front fork so that probably narrows it down. I put a little over 25 miles on the Kona and it felt a lot like my Nebo except the brakes didn't feel quite as good and it was a little more "twitchy" than the Nebo. We rode climbs, downhill, small jumps, smooth, technical and some drops so I got a good sampling of the bikes traits.

    I don't know how the Kona stacks up components or price-wise but couldn't tell a big difference. I missed my bike but it could be just because I'm very familiar with the Nebo. I'm not sure.

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