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  1. #1
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    Explanation of suspension corrected frame??

    Can someone offer up an explanation of what exactly it means for a bike to have suspension corrected geometry?

    I've been looking at some older bikes on craigslist and ebay and have seen models from the same manufacturer (in different ads) that claim to have suspension corrected geometry. Does this mean different frame angles? Shorter headtubes?

  2. #2
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    Used to be the rigid fork was made a few/many mm longer, so that when you put on a suspension fork, it will not change the angles of the bike.
    This is a guess.

  3. #3
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    This is a guess that this is what the ads are refering to.

  4. #4
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by prefixie View Post
    Can someone offer up an explanation of what exactly it means for a bike to have suspension corrected geometry?

    I've been looking at some older bikes on craigslist and ebay and have seen models from the same manufacturer (in different ads) that claim to have suspension corrected geometry. Does this mean different frame angles? Shorter headtubes?
    Frames are designed for specific fork lengths.

    Suspension forks are longer than what a rigid fork needs to be. A frame designed for a suspension fork will have the distance to the bottom the of the head tube adjusted to maintain the proper frame angles. If you put a non-suspension corrected fork on a suspension corrected frame it would drastically steepen the frame angles and lower the BB ht.

    A suspension fork or "corrected" rigid fork on a non-"corrected" frame would slacken the angles.

    Be aware that different fork travel changes the fork length.
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  5. #5
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    If you put a non-suspension corrected fork on a suspension corrected frame it would drastically steepen the frame angles and lower the BB ht.
    It would lower the whole front of the bike, right?

    Make it sort of lean forward?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomBrooklyn View Post
    It would lower the whole front of the bike, right?

    Make it sort of lean forward?
    Yes. The shorthand is 10mm of axle-to-crown height = 1 degree of head/seat angle change. In practice you want to figure out where the fork is at like 25% sag and find a rigid fork with that length.


    Ideally you get a rigid frame to suit your rigid fork needs.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  7. #7
    RAKC Industries
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    Basically yes, would lower the front, thus making the angles steeper, lowering the front down as well as the pedals being closer to the ground.

    So suspension corrected "frame" doesnt actually exist. It is or isnt designed to use with a suspension fork. The rigid (non suspension) forks are what makes the "correction" allowing you to have a rigid fork while keeping everything else feeling and riding the same.

    Basically a road bike for example. Not meant for suspension, so the forks are just rigid forks. Nothing special, normal length, etc

    Now you buy a newer rigid mountain bike with carbon fiber rigid forks. That frame would have been used for the same branded bikes that came with suspension forks as well. So all they do is make the rigid carbon fiber fork the same length as what the suspension for would be with the riders weight on the bike.

    Can get messy these days with a million options. Older bikes in your case are EASY. Suspension corrected rigid forks or suspension forks installed.

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