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  1. #1
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    Dropping chain issue.

    What are the main causes of dropped chains on the trail? The 05 Kona Stinky is mostly ridden by my brother (high school freshman), nothing extreme in terms of use. Lately he's been dropping the chain once or twice every time we go out. Sometimes never.

    Is the chain too long? Bad shifting? Would a BB-mounted Blackspire Stinger help resolve this issue?

  2. #2
    usually cranky
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    could be a long chain, could be bad, shifting, could be worn drivetrain parts, could be jarring terrain, could be the unfortunate stick, could be backpedaling. probably a combo of some if not all. try shortening the chain and go from there.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    could be a long chain, could be bad, shifting, could be worn drivetrain parts, could be jarring terrain, could be the unfortunate stick, could be backpedaling. probably a combo of some if not all. try shortening the chain and go from there.
    Thanks, I'll definitely try shortening the chain first. Definitely not a worn drivetrain, even though it may be a 2005 model, the bike looked mint when I bought it this summer, and it still does. The previous owner rarely rode saying it was too much bike for him in the midwest lol. As for jarring terrain, mostly it's singletrack.

  4. #4
    usually cranky
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    well if the drivetrain is good i doubt its backpedaling. most likely culprit is a chain that is too long, improper shifting, and some unlucky bounces.

  5. #5
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    If your chain is dropping for no reason, it is not likely any of those things listed. It is probably the f-derailer out of adjustment.

    Before you try to shorten the chain, and then rip you rear derailer off your bike cause your chain is too short, you need to make sure the front derailer is set up correctly. The plates should be parallel to the crank, a little above the largest gear, and you have to set the STOP SCREWS CORRECTLY!!! If you don't know how to do this, a local bike shop will probably charge you $15 to fix it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotu
    If your chain is dropping for no reason, it is not likely any of those things listed. It is probably the f-derailer out of adjustment.

    Before you try to shorten the chain, and then rip you rear derailer off your bike cause your chain is too short, you need to make sure the front derailer is set up correctly. The plates should be parallel to the crank, a little above the largest gear, and you have to set the STOP SCREWS CORRECTLY!!! If you don't know how to do this, a local bike shop will probably charge you $15 to fix it.
    Doubt it's that. Before he started riding, the bike was at the LBS for a $75 tune-up/overhaul.

  7. #7
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    If it just got tuned up the chain shouldn't be dropping. Take it back to the LBS and have them fix it.

  8. #8
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotu
    If your chain is dropping for no reason, it is not likely any of those things listed. It is probably the f-derailer out of adjustment.

    Before you try to shorten the chain, and then rip you rear derailer off your bike cause your chain is too short, you need to make sure the front derailer is set up correctly. The plates should be parallel to the crank, a little above the largest gear, and you have to set the STOP SCREWS CORRECTLY!!! If you don't know how to do this, a local bike shop will probably charge you $15 to fix it.
    if the chain was dropping due to over/ under shifting up front it would be pretty apparent.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    if the chain was dropping due to over/ under shifting up front it would be pretty apparent.
    yeah, you would think that.

    Guess there is absolutely no way the front derailer is out of adjustment. I suppose the last (and first) resort is going to have to be to shorten the chain, and better buy a $100 dollar chain guide while you are at it, for good measure.

    and by the way, you are suggesting it could be "improper shifting". How is improper shifting a possible culprit, but a derailer out of tune isn't? What is improper shifting anyway?

  10. #10
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotu
    yeah, you would think that.

    Guess there is absolutely no way the front derailer is out of adjustment. I suppose the last (and first) resort is going to have to be to shorten the chain, and better buy a $100 dollar chain guide while you are at it, for good measure.

    and by the way, you are suggesting it could be "improper shifting". How is improper shifting a possible culprit, but a derailer out of tune isn't? What is improper shifting anyway?
    do you post with the sole intention of starting fights and sounding stupid? if you overshoot your largest chainring because the fd moved out too far its rather obvious. the fd will quite plainly not be alligned with the largest ring. the same goes for under shifting. it doesnt take much for a chain to get bumped off, even if the terrain does not seem rough so shortening the chain is a good place to start provided the fd is adjusted adiquitly (as has been established). so before you go spouting off again why dont you try and learn a thing or two.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    do you post with the sole intention of starting fights and sounding stupid? if you overshoot your largest chainring because the fd moved out too far its rather obvious. the fd will quite plainly not be alligned with the largest ring. the same goes for under shifting. it doesnt take much for a chain to get bumped off, even if the terrain does not seem rough so shortening the chain is a good place to start provided the fd is adjusted adiquitly (as has been established). so before you go spouting off again why dont you try and learn a thing or two.
    What has been established? That he got a tune-up? Why don't you re-read through this thread, and then maybe take some of your own advice.

  12. #12
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotu
    What has been established? That he got a tune-up? Why don't you re-read through this thread, and then maybe take some of your own advice.
    are you saying i should shorten my chain? and yes it was established he got a tune up, and provided the mechanic and op are at least semi companent the fd is not over shifting.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    are you saying i should shorten my chain? and yes it was established he got a tune up, and provided the mechanic and op are at least semi companent the fd is not over shifting.
    Sure, take out 2 or 3 links. While you're at it, I recommend you crank down on your headset top cap too.

  14. #14
    usually cranky
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    i suppose you can always to come on the internet to remind yourself idiocy and ignorance are still prevelant.

  15. #15
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    Too true. That's the real reason why I keep posting on this forum--I am over 3,300 posts behind you. Although its going to be a lot of work and ignorance catching up to you, I think I am up to task.

    These past few weeks have been especially encouraging.

    Edit: Oops, that would be over 3,200 posts. See? I am getting better with my mathmication skillz 2.

  16. #16
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotu
    Too true. That's the real reason why I keep posting on this forum--I am over 3,300 posts behind you. Although its going to be a lot of work and ignorance catching up to you, I think I am up to task.

    These past few weeks have been especially encouraging.

    Edit: Oops, that would be over 3,200 posts. See? I am getting better with my mathmication skillz 2.
    dont get discouraged, your stupidity is second to none and you are completly ignorant!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek
    Thanks, I'll definitely try shortening the chain first. Definitely not a worn drivetrain, even though it may be a 2005 model, the bike looked mint when I bought it this summer, and it still does. The previous owner rarely rode saying it was too much bike for him in the midwest lol. As for jarring terrain, mostly it's singletrack.
    * Could be a bent chainring tooth.
    * A bad chain. I have had a cheap chain drop constantly. Switched brands and it stopped with no other changes.
    * Using the big-big combo. Extreme chain angle when on the larger cogs and big ring can let the chain drop easily.

    Highly unlikely front derailleur has any affect on the issue.
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  18. #18
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    Sweet chic fight! OP, I'd take the advise of the guy whose been around since 05 to the guy who just started riding a year ago, experience trumps info learned from reading, arm chair mechanics rarely get it right.

  19. #19
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by missoularider
    Sweet chic fight! OP, I'd take the advise of the guy whose been around since 05 to the guy who just started riding a year ago, experience trumps info learned from reading, arm chair mechanics rarely get it right.
    turns out the new guy was right (see shiggy's post). dont see how only riding for a couple of years would make me less knowledgable about cause and fixes of dropped chains.

  20. #20
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    Yeah, I don't really know either. I'm just a fan of flame wars! The old school ones in the DH/FR forum always kept me entertained.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    turns out the new guy was right (see shiggy's post). dont see how only riding for a couple of years would make me less knowledgable about cause and fixes of dropped chains.
    Oh really? Is the bike fixed?

    Its funny how quick this got out of hand. I was just trying to help this guy out. Even at this point, the best thing this guy can do is take the bike to the shop that "tuned" it up, and have them dial it in. If he just spent $75 on a tune, it should be dialed. Even if he can diagnose the problem himself, which he can't, I would still suggest not even putting a wrench on it and have the shop that did the tune finish the job.

    However, if the bike has been crashed, or messed with by the OP or his little brother, the shop is not responsible. AND in that case anything, including the front derailer, could be an issue. The first step when diagnosing problems is to make sure everything is adjusted correctly. Then you start replacing crap. At the very least, never assume anything when diagnosing things, that includes bikes, cars, motos, whatever.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotu
    Oh really? Is the bike fixed?

    Its funny how quick this got out of hand. I was just trying to help this guy out. Even at this point, the best thing this guy can do is take the bike to the shop that "tuned" it up, and have them dial it in. If he just spent $75 on a tune, it should be dialed. Even if he can diagnose the problem himself, which he can't, I would still suggest not even putting a wrench on it and have the shop that did the tune finish the job.

    However, if the bike has been crashed, or messed with by the OP or his little brother, the shop is not responsible. AND in that case anything, including the front derailer, could be an issue. The first step when diagnosing problems is to make sure everything is adjusted correctly. Then you start replacing crap. At the very least, never assume anything when diagnosing things, that includes bikes, cars, motos, whatever.
    That's the thing, it wasn't crashed nor messed with by either of us. Since the tune-up last summer, we went on maybe 5 rides or so, this was last summer. I doubt the LBS will look at it in the spring since so much time has passed. I would rather attempt to fix it myself before heading to the LBS.

  23. #23
    usually cranky
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotu
    Oh really? Is the bike fixed?

    Its funny how quick this got out of hand. I was just trying to help this guy out. Even at this point, the best thing this guy can do is take the bike to the shop that "tuned" it up, and have them dial it in. If he just spent $75 on a tune, it should be dialed. Even if he can diagnose the problem himself, which he can't, I would still suggest not even putting a wrench on it and have the shop that did the tune finish the job.

    However, if the bike has been crashed, or messed with by the OP or his little brother, the shop is not responsible. AND in that case anything, including the front derailer, could be an issue. The first step when diagnosing problems is to make sure everything is adjusted correctly. Then you start replacing crap. At the very least, never assume anything when diagnosing things, that includes bikes, cars, motos, whatever.
    look, all i did was say if the fd was throwing the chain it would be apparent, i didnt even disagree with you, that could have been the problem. but for some reason you got all bent out of shape and tried to cut cut down all my valid suggestions.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek
    That's the thing, it wasn't crashed nor messed with by either of us. Since the tune-up last summer, we went on maybe 5 rides or so, this was last summer. I doubt the LBS will look at it in the spring since so much time has passed. I would rather attempt to fix it myself before heading to the LBS.
    In that case, I suggest you start with the easiest things first. Make sure everything is adjusted correctly.

    here, read this.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    look, all i did was say if the fd was throwing the chain it would be apparent, i didnt even disagree with you, that could have been the problem. but for some reason you got all bent out of shape and tried to cut cut down all my valid suggestions.
    Hey, it is great to go ahead and make suggestions, and working on you own bike is a truely wonderful experience. (Ahh...so warm, so nice!) I guess your suggestions are "valid" in that you made them, but I don't get the point of offering advice on something you clearly aren't that sure about. Maybe I'm wrong, and you are personally familiar with this bike. Otherwise, shortening the chain without knowing if the chain is in fact too long is really bad advice. But as the great, late Allen Sherman once said "Bad advice costs nothing, and its worth the price!" (I might be paraphrasing here).

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