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  1. #1
    unrooted
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    Could you ride this trail




    I watched this and thought I wish I could ride that well, maybe with a lot of practice and a lot more padding I would have the balls, or maybe they just look so much more badass because of the gap between landings and jumps which scare me too much!

  2. #2
    meow meow
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    maybe with practice but theres really nothing like that where i ride.

  3. #3
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    Looks like both fun and pretty there but not overly difficult.

  4. #4
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    I agree. Nice section of trail, but nothing out of the ordinary out here in the west where bike parks are springing up everywhere.

  5. #5
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    That really isn't anything too special... though it looks like a blast!

  6. #6
    unrooted
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    I'm a pu$$y..

  7. #7
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    I'd ride it on my 29er
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #8
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    Yup without a doubt!
    I like to fart when I'm in front of you on a climb

  9. #9
    FM
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    Trail network in transitions home turf area is mind-blowing- and they've helped make it happen!

    They've got the full spectrum of trails for all skill levels. Look at some of the photos from Brad Walton on pinkbike for example. The average skill level of riders in bellingham is ridiculous. I enjoy getting served everytime I ride there....Fortunately it's a great scene focused on building the sport- tons of ladies and kids getting after it.

    If you like these kinds of trails- and who wouldn't- check out Freehub magazine. Cool people, solid riders.

    Could you ride this trail-p4pb9683721.jpg

  10. #10
    > /dev/null 2&>1
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    Re: Could you ride this trail

    No offense but you clearly don't watch a lot of mountain biking vids.


    http://www.redbull.com/en/bike/stori...yle-strait-run

  11. #11
    unrooted
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    I just don't expect the owner of a bike company to be such a solid rider. The sh!t straight does is way too far out of my league to to even think I may ever ride that well.

  12. #12
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    While Red Bull Rampage is totally crazy staff and is for elite few, the riding skills demonstrated in the Transition video are totally attainable for a layman...
    It's just progression - you slowly (may be not so slowly for talented ones) improve you balance, position, skills on easier terrain and go bigger and bigger. Those riders in the clip don't overcome fear before every jump, they have made them - or similar - many times before. Sure, sometimes it is about overcoming fear but mostly it is about flow and fun.
    Go to downhill MTB resort, you will learn in a day more than in month of tamer riding. You don't learn how to ski without ski lifts after all - though you can...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I just don't expect the owner of a bike company to be such a solid rider. The sh!t straight does is way too far out of my league to to even think I may ever ride that well.
    Most of them are, or were, great riders that's how they can design such great bikes.
    "You don't stop playing because you get old, you get old because you stop playing!" - Unigeezer

  14. #14
    > /dev/null 2&>1
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    Re: Could you ride this trail

    Well said Sergio

  15. #15
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    Those are some great looking trails. If I read one of the comments right, that's Galbraith?

    My only issue riding some of that stuff is as my skills progress, my age marches along in the opposite direction. Luckily, equipment technology is staying ahead of the latter.

  16. #16
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    Yes I could...

  17. #17
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    Nope, I would hit a tree and die.

    But I have only been riding for like a month, so it makes sense.

  18. #18
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    It's not really as bad or hard as you think as long as you're confident and carrying speed. The key is to follow better riders to get your confidence up. Also there are "B" lines around all of those features. I will say that a solid frame with at least 6" travel (5 if you're really smooth) is a must for that type of riding. I remember the first time I rode "Drop Out" (very similar trail) and thought I was going to die too, only to find out that it's a LOT easier than it looks and wondered why I ever had reservations about riding it before!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  19. #19
    North Van/Whistler
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    That's all we have to ride. Sometimes I want to go to Utah or Colorado and just ride perfectly baby butt smooth trails where you can actually spin out a big ring
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  20. #20
    unrooted
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeL View Post
    That's all we have to ride. Sometimes I want to go to Utah or Colorado and just ride perfectly baby butt smooth trails where you can actually spin out a big ring
    You should go to Bend Or, much smoother than Utah or CO.

  21. #21
    I like bikes
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    But of course, I am Canadian.
    The older I get, the faster I was.....

  22. #22
    Huffy Rider
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    Yes, I could and I would, and I will someday. That looks like a ton of fun!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I just don't expect the owner of a bike company to be such a solid rider. The sh!t straight does is way too far out of my league to to even think I may ever ride that well.
    You ought to check out Chris and Lance Canfield (the owners of Canfield bikes). They're former Red Bull Rampage competitors. And they're not just dead sailor hucksters like Bender was. They can actually pedal too. I by chance rode Bobsled (salt lake city) with them years ago while they were testing out a prototype frame, and I've never seen anyone able to ride it that fast.
    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
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  24. #24
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    Could definitely ride that after living in New England all my life. I've done most of my riding in Massachusetts and there are some absolutely ridiculous trails around here... obviously they aren't nearly as fun, flowy, big, or popular as stuff out West but there are several trails even within 30 minutes of my house that are essentially "unrideable" as in if you can make it through the entire trail without getting off your bike once you are either getting paid to bike and make videos or you're an idiot.

  25. #25
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    Im fortunate enough to live a 10 min drive through bad traffic from those trails. I started mt. biking a year and a half ago and when I first went on those trails the stuff seemed huge and reserved for the young and crazy. After alot of practice, practice, practice, and taking the next step within my abilities, I have hit pretty much everything in that video. So if you stuck with it and didn't go over your head, I bet you could. It really helps too that the trail builders here have great skill and vision, you don't have to start out on the biggest stuff, there is plenty of slower speed, smaller jumps to freak you out until you go to the med. stuff etc. etc.

  26. #26
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    I'm pretty sure i just got tricked into watching a stupid advertisement.

  27. #27
    Norđwegr
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porch View Post
    I'm pretty sure i just got tricked into watching a stupid advertisement.


    I must agree. It even tricked me into looking at their website and the pricing is bonkers for a brand I've never heard a whisper of before.

    The Covert 29 frame does look nice though.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vegard View Post
    I must agree. It even tricked me into looking at their website and the pricing is bonkers for a brand I've never heard a whisper of before.

    The Covert 29 frame does look nice though.
    Never heard of Transition? What rock have you been living under?

    As for the video, I might have to work up to some of the gap-ier jumps but I'd certainly be able to manage most of it without much issue. Looks super fun!

  29. #29
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    Pfft, try Champery, in the wet.

    "How does Danny Hart sit down with balls that BIG?"

  30. #30
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    My takeaway from that video: "This bike is really good at jumping." There was a lot of talk about quiver killers, being decent uphill and downhill, etc. but all of them seemed to agree that the place the bike really rocked it was being "poppy" for jumps, and the footage was basically all of them taking little to mid-sized jumps and drops. Looks like a fun trail, but unless that's all you ride I didn't come away with the impression that the bike is particularly interesting.

    And yeah, I'd ride that trail. Looks like a lot of fun. None of the features look too difficult - after a couple of laps, once I knew what was coming, I think I'd be willing to hit most of it pretty fast.

  31. #31
    unrooted
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porch View Post
    I'm pretty sure i just got tricked into watching a stupid advertisement.
    Not trying to trick anyone, I was just interested to find out if anyone thought that the riding in this trail looked very hard/scary to you.

    I have been riding a hardtail for a long time, I am currently riding a Transition Transam 29 because it was the cheapest frame I could find that was considered an AM bike.

    This summer I demoed an Ibis Mojo, I think it had 6" of travel. I was able to bomb through stuff I would've been picking my way through on my ht (at the time I was riding a Motobecane Phantom29). I was really blown away by how easy everything felt on the Mojo, I even blasted through a section of braking bumps that would've been miserable on my ht.

    I really want a 5" Am 29er and I'm hoping it will open up more options for me. I ride a lot at Mammoth mtn, pedaling my way up and going back down. This summer the only "black diamond" trails I would go down were the sections that were smooth but with a lot of table tops. I accidentally went down some steep rocky stuff and did not have a good time doing so. I'm hoping that I'll be able to hit up anything at the mtn if I find the right bike.

    Last week I went to Bootleg and had a horrible time on anything but the "xc" trails, I tried to ride Eastern leg and it SUCKED.

    I have been mtn biking for 19 years now, the one ride on the Ibis being the only FS bike I've ridden, and I'm a decent rider (according to my strava times!), I feel like it's time to finally get a FS sled so i can be as good a rider as all you guys that have only been riding a few years but started on full suspension bikes...

  32. #32
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    That trail looks pretty easy to ride. As a first time on it, I'd want to ride behind someone so I'd know how fast to hit the jumps though. That's probably the trickiest part about drops and jumps - not knowing how fast to hit things to nail the transitions. After you've ridden the trail a few times and know the right speeds and what's coming up, a trail like that is actually pretty easy (and fun!).

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeL View Post
    That's all we have to ride. Sometimes I want to go to Utah or Colorado and just ride perfectly baby butt smooth trails where you can actually spin out a big ring
    Funny, because that trail was more baby butt smooth than most trails out here in CO. The trails I ride regularly are nowhere near that smooth/groomed. Airing into rock gardens is a pretty common occurrence - so is blurred vision from your eyeballs rattling inside their sockets. On the other hand, we don't have jumps and gaps manicured into our trails - you have to be creative and find them. That's what bike parks are for though.

  33. #33
    unrooted
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    I was blown away by how rocky the trails in the front range were, I rode Lyons, Breckenridge and Lair o the bear. Lair o the bear was the only one I enjoyed! The riding in Eagle and Fruita was amazing though!

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lindahl View Post

    Funny, because that trail was more baby butt smooth than most trails out here in CO. The trails I ride regularly are nowhere near that smooth/groomed. Airing into rock gardens is a pretty common occurrence - so is blurred vision from your eyeballs rattling inside their sockets. On the other hand, we don't have jumps and gaps manicured into our trails - you have to be creative and find them. That's what bike parks are for though.
    The videographer took out the parts where there are roots because it would make Colorado riders heads explode with the sheer alienness of any hint of technicality
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  35. #35
    dwt
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    Could you ride this trail

    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post

    I have been mtn biking for 19 years now, the one ride on the Ibis being the only FS bike I've ridden, and I'm a decent rider (according to my strava times!), I feel like it's time to finally get a FS sled so i can be as good a rider as all you guys that have only been riding a few years but started on full suspension bikes...
    I started a few years before you did when ALL bikes were hardtails and guys like John Tomac rode anything and everything hard and with skill and grace and speed on one bike.

    So for the bazilionth time, it is the motor not the machine that cleans the terrain. In my case, simply lacking the innate coordination and athletic ability, no amount of practice and no bike will suddenly make me into a shredding stud, landing the tiniest gap or doing any approximation of a tail whip, for example. Cleaning technical terrain certainly can be mastered by most average riders with practice and experience, and definitely easier on a full squish with at least 5" of travel, but to do it fast with big air requires practice, experience and something you are born with.

    That's my excuse, anyway, but as a grey geezer I still have fun and love mtn bikes above anything else, even if I'm just an average joe.

    If were you, I'd ditch the 29'er and get a Bronson or a Tracer or other 5-6" 27.5 bike. As the cliche goes, a little better roll than 26" without losing too much of the maneuverability.

    One more thing: f**k Strava
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  36. #36
    unrooted
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    I use strava to see if I'm actually improving since I almost exclusively ride by myself, or with my very slow wife. I do like that i can see how I compare to the other riders in the area, I tend to be in the top 10% on climbs but in the top 50% on downhills. I can definately see why strava gets a horrible rep, especially in populated areas where people tend to be douchey already!

    I have never been a great on the downhills, and I obviously do not have the genetics that John Tomac or his son Eli were obviously born with, but I also don't think todays trails look anything like the stuff that Tomac was killing it on in the early-mid 90's (I actually got my first mountain bike in 1989, a Bridgestone MB-6!). I think todays trails are built/designed with 4-6" of travel in mind and that someone with my ****tty genetics need that type of bike to have fun. I do have a friend that has always been an amazing athlete and I'm pretty sure he could destroy me on any downhill with him on a cross bike and me on a downhill sled!

  37. #37
    dwt
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    Could you ride this trail

    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I use strava to see if I'm actually improving since I almost exclusively ride by myself, or with my very slow wife. I do like that i can see how I compare to the other riders in the area, I tend to be in the top 10% on climbs but in the top 50% on downhills. I can definately see why strava gets a horrible rep, especially in populated areas where people tend to be douchey already!

    I have never been a great on the downhills, and I obviously do not have the genetics that John Tomac or his son Eli were obviously born with, but I also don't think todays trails look anything like the stuff that Tomac was killing it on in the early-mid 90's (I actually got my first mountain bike in 1989, a Bridgestone MB-6!). I think todays trails are built/designed with 4-6" of travel in mind and that someone with my ****tty genetics need that type of bike to have fun. I do have a friend that has always been an amazing athlete and I'm pretty sure he could destroy me on any downhill with him on a cross bike and me on a downhill sled!
    That was the same bike I started on. NOW we have disc brakes that stop the bike and modulate both, indexed shifting, front and rear suspension, tubeless tires, clipless pedals, dropper posts, and other upgrades and improvements that make the experience much more fun.

    Nothing we can do about genetics, but we can still improve our skills and fitness and have fun. We can also buy awesome and hugely expensive bikes. But I don't need or want to time myself up or down hills. I'm hard enough on myself as it is; objective evidence of how much I suck won't help.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  38. #38
    unrooted
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    I haven't been riding much the last few years due to an addiction to rock climbing, but I broke a toe last spring which put me back on my bike. Now I can't stop thinking about riding. I live less than an hour from Mammoth so I have spent quite a few evenings up there. There are alot of trails up there that I can ride with my hardtail, and I have a great time doing so, but there a whole lot of trails that I've tried riding and was thrown all over the place. Same problem when I rode at bootleg a couple weeks ago.

    I'm 35 now, and I finally have a "real job", so I should be able to afford an "expensive" bike, which to me would be in the 3k-4k range. Maybe a new bike won't make that big of a difference, but I'll find out!

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