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  1. #1
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    Conti Mountain King II pinch

    So, I have one question about these:
    I am thinking about getting a pair of 2.4"'s without any sidewall protection for my trail bike.
    These: Continental Mountain King II Wire Tyre | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com
    But I don't know whether they'll pinch too easily? I'm used to running dual ply maxxis minions on my DH bike and want a tough tyre for my trail bike as i'm quite an aggressive rider. Will these do? Or should i just get single wall high rollers like i am tempted to?
    Cheers
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Grimmer View Post
    So, I have one question about these:
    I am thinking about getting a pair of 2.4"'s without any sidewall protection for my trail bike.
    These: Continental Mountain King II Wire Tyre | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com
    But I don't know whether they'll pinch too easily? I'm used to running dual ply maxxis minions on my DH bike and want a tough tyre for my trail bike as i'm quite an aggressive rider. Will these do? Or should i just get single wall high rollers like i am tempted to?
    Cheers
    The Mountain King's are crazy light which means unless they've broken the code on tires they've cut weight in the casing. Do people in your area have experience on these? Most guys here in CO who ride the rocky technical stuff prefer Trail King's black chili's or single ply High Rollers over the Mountain King.

    I pasted two links in. Notice how much lighter the MK's are in 2.4 than the TK's/RQ are in 2.4.

    Continental Bicycle -Mountain King 2.4

    Continental Bicycle -Rubber Queen/Trail King
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  3. #3
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    Cheers, no, I have not heard anyone talk about these unfortunately. But the RQ or the MK without any sidewall protection are less than half the price (15 instead of 43) of the protected, black chilli ones! I can get high roller single ply for 23 each so am tempted to go for these. I want a relatively light weigh tyre (hence single ply), but then again i need them to stand up to light DH. I've heard people have even had issues with the single ply high rollers being too thin..
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Grimmer View Post
    Cheers, no, I have not heard anyone talk about these unfortunately. But the RQ or the MK without any sidewall protection are less than half the price (15 instead of 43) of the protected, black chilli ones! I can get high roller single ply for 23 each so am tempted to go for these. I want a relatively light weigh tyre (hence single ply), but then again i need them to stand up to light DH. I've heard people have even had issues with the single ply high rollers being too thin..
    If you are use to DH casings, any single ply casing is going to pinch flat more easily.

    The single ply tire at higher pressure can have a similar feel to lower pressure in a DH casing, so inflate by ride feel rather than actual pressure.
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  5. #5
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    I refuse to ride continental tires. I was getting a pinch flat every single ride so I exchanged it for a Nevegal. 6 months, low pressure and not a single pinch flat.

    "The single ply tire at higher pressure can have a similar feel to lower pressure in a DH casing"

    This sounds terrible to me because if it has a higher pressure that means the tire has a smaller contact patch resulting in less grip. I wouldnt even use their tires if they were free because I'd spend so much money in replacing tubes it would cost more than if I bought my own tire.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ihaveagibsonsg View Post
    I refuse to ride continental tires. I was getting a pinch flat every single ride so I exchanged it for a Nevegal. 6 months, low pressure and not a single pinch flat.

    "The single ply tire at higher pressure can have a similar feel to lower pressure in a DH casing"

    This sounds terrible to me because if it has a higher pressure that means the tire has a smaller contact patch resulting in less grip. I wouldnt even use their tires if they were free because I'd spend so much money in replacing tubes it would cost more than if I bought my own tire.
    All else being equal, a stiff casing deforms less than a supple casing at the same pressure. The supple casing will have more grip. For the stiffer casing to deform the same amount, it has to be used at lower pressure.

    Talking about characteristics of tires only by brand rather than specific models, versions and size is not very useful. A Conti Race King Supersonic 2.0 is very different from a Conti Der Baron Apex 2.5. Just as the Kenda Nevegal 2.10 120tpi XC version is hardly going to perform the same as the Nevegal 2.70 Cap ply DH version.
    Last edited by shiggy; 09-13-2012 at 05:21 PM.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilsonblur View Post
    The Mountain King's are crazy light which means unless they've broken the code on tires they've cut weight in the casing. Do people in your area have experience on these? Most guys here in CO who ride the rocky technical stuff prefer Trail King's black chili's or single ply High Rollers over the Mountain King.

    I pasted two links in. Notice how much lighter the MK's are in 2.4 than the TK's/RQ are in 2.4.

    Continental Bicycle -Mountain King 2.4

    Continental Bicycle -Rubber Queen/Trail King
    The weight differences are not really in the casings.

    The MK 2.4 does have a lower volume casing than the TK 2.4
    Some of the versions of the TK do have the Apex sidewall insert, while the MK does not.
    There is less tread rubber in the MK. Rubber is the heaviest part of a tire, and accounts for most of the difference.
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  8. #8
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    I have experience with the MK2's Pro, X-Kings Pro and the Trail Kings UST, all Black Chili, all run tubeless and all on my all mountain bike. I ride aggressive and in nasty, rocky terrain. I found the need to run the MK and XK (2.4's) at a higher pressure then when I run the Trail Kings (2.2's) This is because they are flimsier. They are both a good tire, but are no where near as tough as the Trail Kings in the same environment. The Trail Kings last 3 to 4 times longer then the others. Good luck and if you have more specific questions, I will try to answer them.

  9. #9
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    Why not just get the Protection version of the MK if you're worried? The added protection would be worth the weight penelty I'd imagine, unless you exclusively ride very smooth trails (and even then you might prefer the stability of the beefier side walls on the protection version).

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    The weight differences are not really in the casings.

    The MK 2.4 does have a lower volume casing than the TK 2.4
    Some of the versions of the TK do have the Apex sidewall insert, while the MK does not.
    There is less tread rubber in the MK. Rubber is the heaviest part of a tire, and accounts for most of the difference.
    You're probably right in the weight department I just experience tearing in the sidewalls of the MK and not in the TK. Like you said the rubber could just be better and thicker. I said casing including the rubber overlay was what I meant. Its just thicker on the TK's. I have the TK's with the Apex sidewall insert and just love them. I swore off non-UST tires for tubeless but these tubeless ready TK's are great and have won me over as long as I don't go below 25psi they are perfect.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ihaveagibsonsg View Post
    I refuse to ride continental tires. I was getting a pinch flat every single ride so I exchanged it for a Nevegal. 6 months, low pressure and not a single pinch flat.
    This will always be a problem when running tubes. I really like the Nevegals in UST. I think the TK's are better. My third ride on my Nevegal UST's the casing go punctured so I patched it and rode it until it wouldn't seal any longer. They are really good tires, but I think the TK's are better. Some day you should try UST, its so much better than tubed IMO whether Nevegal or TK's.
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  12. #12
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    I didn't get the protection because it was 43 instead of 15! But I ended up getting high roller 2.35's single ply. I guess I will just run them at a higher pressure and try not to hit any square edges!
    Well I've always considered tubeless, but i don't think i could be bothered with all the stans faff, and if you get a ripped tyre you're f***ed.
    Thanks for the help
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  13. #13
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    So I'm confused, are Rubber Queens and TK's the same tire in Canada?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by djball View Post
    So I'm confused, are Rubber Queens and TK's the same tire in Canada?
    Yes.

    And you're only screwed with a sidewall tear and tubeless if you're not prepared. I had the proper goods when my friend ripped his and it worked out just fine.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Grimmer View Post
    I didn't get the protection because it was 43 instead of 15! But I ended up getting high roller 2.35's single ply. I guess I will just run them at a higher pressure and try not to hit any square edges!
    Well I've always considered tubeless, but i don't think i could be bothered with all the stans faff, and if you get a ripped tyre you're f***ed.
    Thanks for the help
    If you are careful in your tire choice you won't have ripped sidewalls. If you go really light sure you could have that happen, but that's why you go with a UST or TR tire that's not under 800 grams. I have been riding them for 8 years in all kinds of conditions and never had a tire tear where I couldn't ride it home. Also, just carry a tube in your pack just in case something catastrophic happens.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilsonblur View Post
    If you are careful in your tire choice you won't have ripped sidewalls. If you go really light sure you could have that happen, but that's why you go with a UST or TR tire that's not under 800 grams. I have been riding them for 8 years in all kinds of conditions and never had a tire tear where I couldn't ride it home. Also, just carry a tube in your pack just in case something catastrophic happens.
    Not simply a tire choice. In 29 years of mountain biking in all terrain, using hundreds of different tires I have damaged the sidewalls of maybe 5 tires. Most of those were broken glass cuts or misaligned rim brakes. Maybe twice that number of tread area casing cuts.

    Even been on rides where others using the same tires riding the same lines destroy tires and I had not as much as a sidewall scuff mark.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Not simply a tire choice. In 29 years of mountain biking in all terrain, using hundreds of different tires I have damaged the sidewalls of maybe 5 tires. Most of those were broken glass cuts or misaligned rim brakes. Maybe twice that number of tread area casing cuts.

    Even been on rides where others using the same tires riding the same lines destroy tires and I had not as much as a sidewall scuff mark.
    Thanks for easing my mind, shiggy! So, the Mountain Kings II I bought a coupla months ago will handle the volcanic-rocky terrain of Bend just fine, assuming I pick my lines like an expert (which I think I do)? I know you've ridden Bend dozens of times. This thread almost - almost - had me worried about my choice.

    Thanks!

  18. #18
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    I did a review, you might find it usefull:

    All Mountain Next: Review: Continental Mountain King II Racesport

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Not simply a tire choice. In 29 years of mountain biking in all terrain, using hundreds of different tires I have damaged the sidewalls of maybe 5 tires. Most of those were broken glass cuts or misaligned rim brakes. Maybe twice that number of tread area casing cuts.

    Even been on rides where others using the same tires riding the same lines destroy tires and I had not as much as a sidewall scuff mark.
    Personal experience is hard to argue with because it varies so much. There are also many factors to consider as to why you or I experience what we do on the trail. My buddy loves Weirwolves from WTB. In UST they are around 700-800 grams. He keeps ripping or having the side walls cut, and that would be three of them. He's given up on them. Another buddy had Geax and he ripped both of them. Maxxis Crossmarks I have also seen several of them torn. Softer lighter tires with thin sidewalls don't fair as well here in Colorado. If you choose tires that don't suit your conditions you can be punished by them.

    While you have seen only 5 torn side walls in 29 years all the ones (6-8) I have personally witnessed have been in the passed 18 months. I have also seen a Speicalized Eskar torn but some fancy patch work and duct tape fixed it in Moab. Certain areas of the country have rockier terrain that challenges certain lightweight x-country tires like Arizona, Utah and Colorado. Just search the front range forum for tire recommendations to see how many times people get their tires thrashed here and look to the locals for recommendations. Certain riding styles and types of riding also require more careful tire choice. That's why DH's don't use 400 gram tires. This an AM forum so tire choice is a big deal for your 6+ AM rig.

    For my personal experience I have never ripped any sidewalls in 17 years of riding. I also went for about 5 years without a flat. My buddies who wreck tires tend to bulldoze their way down our rocky trails while I tend to pick better lines and ride smoother than they do. They also brake frames and dent rims and I ride everything as fast and as hard as they do. Colorado also has its share of meadowy smooth singletrack. You could ride those for years without anything happening to your tires. So like I said personal experience is just that, its not definitive.
    Last edited by wilsonblur; 09-15-2012 at 06:42 PM.
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  20. #20
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    Black chili's SHRED (not in a good way) on hard SoCal pack. I blew through a pair in 200 miles, full on knobs ripping off down to the base layer. Not sure what you ride on but I'd really re-consider black chili stuff. I came off a pair of Schwalbe RaRas that I thought I burnt through quickly, they lasted 2.5x as long as my Mtn King 2.2s. Very unimpressed.

  21. #21
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    I run the mountain king 2 in 2.4" front and 2.2" rear and I haven't had problems with pinch flats on my all mountain bike. I'm pretty happy with them and will probably get another set when they wear out. I ride some pretty rocky terrain as well and they are holding up great.

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