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  1. #1
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    Confidence going from Stumpy to Enduro

    Will switching from a Stumpy to Specialized Enduro significantly increase my confidence such that I may be willing or daring descend more technical and steeper terrain than I would normally feel comfortable doing on a stumpy? Would I loose more in climbing efficiency than what I would gain in downhill confidence?

    I am a 42 year old that can descend technical and steep terrain as long as it is not crazy difficult. Sometimes I have to slow down but rarely do I need to get off the bike. I am working on building confidence and would consider switching to an Enduro if it helps me in being a little more daring on the downhill. I am in very good physical condition, so my stronger side is certainly climbing. I don't think I'd be willing to make the suggested change if I am giving up too much in climbing with respect to any additional confidence that the bike might offer.

    I currently own a 2013 S-Works StumpJumper FSR 29. I am considering changing to an S-Works Enduro 26 or S-Works Enduro 29 which will be available in the 2014 models.

    Will switching provide what I am looking for? If so, should I go with Enduro 26 or Enduro 29?

    Thanks
    Jesus

  2. #2
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    If confidence is your problem a bigger bike won't solve anything, you'll ride the same, just with 20mm more travel and a slacker bike.

    You're already riding almost a $10k bike, rather than spending several thousand more on another bike, why not spend a fraction of that on some skills training? Practice and someone helping you get the technique right will build your confidence way better than new stuff.

  3. #3
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    I think you should be able to ride any terrain with just about any bike, if the skills are there. More or less bikes like the Stumpy can handle pretty much anything you can throw at it. At least the 26" version I don't like jumps, drops with bigger wheels. Personal preference there, I think spade is on the money.
    Your big wheels are so awesome!

  4. #4
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    As usual, it is the rider more than it is the bike. That said, I can also tell you that I went from a bike with XC'ish geometry to my Enduro a while back. On my 4th ride on my Enduro, my brother happened to be visiting and came along. He said I was quite a bit faster on the Enduro -- usually, he is right on my tail, and he was falling back a bit on this ride. I also hit much larger drops and obstacles last summer on my Enduro than I have ever done, or thought I'd do -- the Enduro feels a lot more stable in the air, and makes me feel like I can go bigger and bigger. So having geometry that is better suited to going down hill fast and jumping off things does help one's confidence. I'd say that I'm not now able to ride terrain I was unable to ride before, but I can now ride it faster and with more confidence.

    I don't know about climbing, though -- I was slow on my old bike, and I'm slow on this bike. I climb to get to the downhills, and don't really care how long it takes to get to the top, as long as I eventually get there.

    Good luck!
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badpichu View Post
    I think you should be able to ride any terrain with just about any bike, if the skills are there. More or less bikes like the Stumpy can handle pretty much anything you can throw at it. At least the 26" version I don't like jumps, drops with bigger wheels. Personal preference there, I think spade is on the money.
    Good point, I know some guys with $50 bikes that ride more and better than some $2000 bikes owners...

  6. #6
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    My buddy weighs well over 200 pounds, and he feels much more confident on his new Enduro than he did on his Stumpy. Both carbon models. I can tell, because he's much faster on the downhills. He said the Stumpy just felt like it was going to explode on him. I believe much of the feeling was due to a standard quick release front axle, lighter and flexier frame, and a Fox Float that didn't have a compression adjustment, which resulted in a lot of brake dive. Confidence can go a long way.

    If you're feeling a lack of confidence in your ability, then buying a more capable bike is a waste. If you're lacking confidence in your bike, then buying a more capable bike is a wise investment.

  7. #7
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    More slack ht = better at descending.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the Replies so far. Sounds like it won't give me the skills to tackle riskier terrain but it will help me go faster on what I can already ride?

  9. #9
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    Confidence going from Stumpy to Enduro

    Quote Originally Posted by Fix the Spade View Post
    If confidence is your problem a bigger bike won't solve anything, you'll ride the same, just with 20mm more travel and a slacker bike.

    You're already riding almost a $10k bike, rather than spending several thousand more on another bike, why not spend a fraction of that on some skills training? Practice and someone helping you get the technique right will build your confidence way better than new stuff.
    Agree. A three day class could work wonders.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarango View Post
    Thanks for the Replies so far. Sounds like it won't give me the skills to tackle riskier terrain but it will help me go faster on what I can already ride?
    Not quite. I would think of the Enduro as a tool which is better suited to aggressive terrain. Your skills don't change (though they likely will improve with saddle time even if you don't switch bikes) but the bike is more suitable for technical terrain. Slack head angle and more travel are more forgiving when the trail gets rough or steep.

    In a pinch, you could use a set of pliers to turn a hex head bolt but it's not the best choice. Similarly, you could ride a rigid bike anywhere you want to go but that doesn't mean it's your best choice. Compared to the Stumpjumper, the Enduro is better suited to rough and steep technical terrain. If your goal is confidence in those situations, the Enduro will likely deliver. The best way to know is to test ride one on your trail of choice. Does your shop have demo bikes?
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  11. #11
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    Thanks Zebrahum,

    Yes, my goal is to increase confidence in terrain that I am not so confident. Saddle time is the main thing but if the Enduro speeds the process then why not.

    Yes, I am arranging for an Enduro 26 demo with my LBS. The problem is that one demo ride is often not enough, even if it is in proper terrain. For example, I did a 12 mile demo on a good technical single track to determine if I should go with a large or small stumpy. I switched a few times between the sizes and by the end of the demo I was still not sure. It took some time to realize that my size was medium.

  12. #12
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    Why go all-in on the S-Works Enduro? If you like the Stumpy for some of your riding, why not keep it and get a lower spec Enduro for the rougher stuff? Or something even a bit more burly?

    The way I looked at it when I bought my Enduro, I had about $3500 to spend, and I like to ride a wide variety of terrain -- from longer XC'ish loops to bike parks and lifts and everything in between. I figured I'd rather have a nice bike that I could ride everywhere than two $1500-2000 bikes. But I would rather have 2 $3000-4000 bikes (keeping in the Spesh lineup, say, a Stumpy 29er and a Demo or an Enduro Evo) than one "do it all" bike for $6-8k. Don't get me wrong -- I love my Enduro, and it does as well in all circumstances as I could expect any one bike to do -- but next time I'm bike shopping (and hopefully my budget will be double my budget last time around), I won't likely be getting another Enduro.

    Good luck!
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  13. #13
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    The enduro certainly inspires confidence.. I haven't ridden the stumpy but my good friend did a long term demo on one and just felt like it was not quite enough bike.
    BBZ

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  14. #14
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    Re: Confidence going from Stumpy to Enduro

    I have done this switch. The answer is yes for going down.
    I went from a stumpy evo to to an enduro. I am way better at speed with enduro, though I feel the longer stiffer fork plays a big part. I also feel the bike climbs better.
    Whats this line for?

  15. #15
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    I've had five stump fsr bikes and two enduros over the past 10 years. I would say that the enduro is way more bike than the stump. I've ridden both a lot in races and bike parks, jumps and crazy rocky terrain. Along with the enduro came wider, tougher tires and the stiffer chassis and slacker angles REALLY made a difference in my riding.

    I spent all last year at bike parks riding the enduro off of stuff that would curl your hair. I was doing 10 foot drops, 20 foot gaps, wall rides, step ups, step downs... The stump is a GREAT bike but the enduro really is a different beast.

    People who tell you 'it's not the bike, it's the rider', don't have enough bikes. Get an enduro and buy a lift ticket for a few weekends. You'll learn SO MUCH your brain will hurt. At 42, it's time. I'm 38...

    mk
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbiker24 View Post
    If you're feeling a lack of confidence in your ability, then buying a more capable bike is a waste. If you're lacking confidence in your bike, then buying a more capable bike is a wise investment.
    Well put. I would like to add that new riders or XC oriented ones might struggle to tell the difference.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailbildr View Post
    Get an enduro and buy a lift ticket for a few weekends. You'll learn SO MUCH your brain will hurt.
    This is the way to go. You will get SO much better in just a few days at a bike park.
    6'5" 230lbs
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  18. #18
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    Climbs better than the Stumpy?

  19. #19
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    Invest in some skills clinics then a new bike.

  20. #20
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    I've never ridden an Enduro or a Stumpy, but personally I'd love to own both. I don't believe in one do-it-all bike. I think about 10 bikes are ideal!

    Keep both! I'm saving for an Enduro, love that geometry.

  21. #21
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    I don't want to twist any panties here, but PLEASE check out the Intense Tracer 275 bike. It's pretty close to enduro geo but with the bigger wheels, it's makes the bike that much better. 275 feels like 26 most of the time but it spins up to a higher speed when going down hill and holds lines better in the rough. Maxxis has their 275 big-boy tires available now.

    mk
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailbildr View Post
    I don't want to twist any panties here
    I dont wear any panties
    6'5" 230lbs
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailbildr View Post
    I don't want to twist any panties here, but PLEASE check out the Intense Tracer 275 bike. It's pretty close to enduro geo but with the bigger wheels, it's makes the bike that much better. 275 feels like 26 most of the time but it spins up to a higher speed when going down hill and holds lines better in the rough. Maxxis has their 275 big-boy tires available now.

    mk
    I suppose if money isn't an option this sounds like a good idea.. on the other hand, seeing as 26 wheeled bikes are obsolete, I bet you could pick up a used enduro for a pretty discounted price, I mean really, who in their right mind would ride a 26 wheeled bike?
    Last edited by billybobzia; 04-24-2013 at 07:26 AM.
    BBZ

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarango View Post
    Climbs better than the Stumpy?
    The rougher the trail the better the Enduro will climb relative to the Stumpy. On a fireroad grind: no.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  25. #25
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    Well I guess the direction this is all going that 26" tires are no longer a valid wheel size and you should buy a down hill bike! ha It is interesting all the different angles you get. I like a bigger bike myself but I learned on smaller bikes and the fact that I can do it on a smaller bike has helped my skills. I was riding a good size drop not long ago, some dude hit it with his XC bike which goes to show the point that many here are saying, the rider skill is vital. I think the main reason to purchase a bigger bike is because you feel the bike can't handle what you are throwing at it or it is holding you back. Please post pictures of your bike either way. haha
    Your big wheels are so awesome!

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