Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 36
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    46

    climbing with 160mm fork

    Does anyone climb with a 160mm fork? More specifically a marz. 66 rc3?

    Any opinions on this? I want to do freeride stuff, but don't want to shuttle with the "cheaters".

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,089
    I have Lyriks, non adjustable. Climb fine. With the marzocchis, just dial in a litlle low speed comp. Make sure your seatpost can go high enough to get a good leg extension

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    535
    I have a TALAS 36 with the 160-130-100 adjustment. I really don't like climbing with it set to 160 on technical terrain or when it's very steep. If you don't intend to do that type of climbing, you're probably fine with a 160. (Some people prefer the 160 even for technical and steep climbs because they say it creates a more consistent feel.)

  4. #4
    Mojo0115
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,667
    I have a Lyrik that I can dial down for climbs and do drop it down to around 140mm pretty regularly if I know the climb is going to last. I don't bother for shorter climbs.

    That said, I probably do about 80% of my climbs with the fork at full length simply because I can't be bothered and the difference is not that noticeable so I often just plain forget to dial down the fork and even more often forget to dial it back on the descent until get into it.

  5. #5
    Just roll it......
    Reputation: ebxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,486
    66 rc3 = 180mm of travel and a A2c of 565mm.

    36, Lyrik, Wotan, 55 = 160mm of travel and ~545mm A2C

    I've got a 36 and my bike climbs pretty welll at 160mm, but my frame also has a zero stack headset which keeps the front end lower. When things get steep, I drop it to 130mm. When they get really steep, I drop it to 100mm.

    Cheers,
    EB

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,746
    i can climb with my 160mm fox van no problem

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,848
    Me too, Van36R on ReignX1 and it climbs everything but the super-steep.
    But you are leaving out a huge variable - the bike!

    Virtual-pivot (style) bikes generally climb better with tall forks than single-pivot or FSR, etc bikes, since they squat less, and will keep the front wheel on the ground better.

  8. #8
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,032
    I've got a Lyrik on my 575 and climb most of the technical stuff with it at 150 or 160mm. I could dial it down but then my BB drops too much and I get a lot of pedal strikes. For long-ish smoother climbs I often run it at 130 or so, it just feels a bit better at 130 when seated and climbing for a while.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    7,900
    I am running a lyrik and did a little experiment yesterday - our most techy extended climb with no raising the seat or u-turn utilization.

    I found that TECHNIQUE is everything. Even after having switched to a 60mm stem and 2" risers, with some finesse you can still make it just fine.

    My technique was garnered from this bit of advice:
    Quote Originally Posted by Ro.nin
    There's a certain technique they teach you for climbing. Most of the guys have brushed a bit on it.

    Pardon my french - the technique is called: F@ck The Football

    So imagine you're holding a football and doing the 'respective' motion towards it. That means:

    - hands placed on the bars as close (narrow) as possible, without giving up control - the football is narrow, right; and you wanna 'hold it'...
    - slightly pull on the bars - this will keep your front wheel on the ground - you wanna pull the ball towards you...
    - keep your elbows tucked in, while pulling on the bars. Do not pull too hard - you will get tired - as usual
    - move your mid-section forward - you're holding a football with your hands/elbows and try to 'do it', remember?
    - lean slightly forward - maybe you want to be 'nice' to the ball at the same time...

    There you go. Basically all those things everyone said before me, but in a formula easier to remember...

    F@ck The Football.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    102
    I have a 150mm marz all mountain 3 fork. I do mostly cross country on it. I can switch the lever on the fork to lock it out on long climbs, but I usually forget until its too late. The only time it sucks to climb is when I don't have it locked out and I'm trying to stand up for medium length to long climbs. There is just too much give in the front.

    If I stay seated I have no problems. Raising the seat will help, but I usually forget that too.

  11. #11
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059

    First thing first...

    Maybe I missed it, but what kind of bike are we talking about? A 66RC on a Stumpjumper FSR will likely create a crazy climbing geometry, but on another bike...?

    I don't use travel reduction adjustments on any of my long travel forks. A Van 36, an '06 66SL, and an '08 Nixon 160 Elite. All of these forks have been on a Nomad and older Bullits. Practically nothing seems to hinder the climbing ability of my Nomad with these forks, and the Bullits only tend to feel the higher geometry issue with the 66SL at its 170mm full extension. A super short wheelbase bike with relatively short chainstays will probably not be as good for climbing with a 160mm fork, but most others should be fine. Lean forward a bit more as the climb steepens to improve front wheel stability.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    84
    I have a lyric also and do most climbs in 160 mainly because
    I often don't have time to switch down to 115, or it is too bumpy to take a hand of the bar to switch the fork.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nickgto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    785
    My BMC Superstroke (6 inch short 4 bar parallel link) is steered & suspended by a 170mm 66RC2X (555 AC height). Although the fork doesn't have travel adjustment, I can still do 8 mile climbs with 3,500 feet elevation gain as well as steep technical climbs with the bike. Luckily the Superstroke came with a zerostack headset thus the HA isn't that slack and sits at a guesstimated 67 degrees.

    On long fireroad climbs, I set the rebound knob of my fork to full slow and set the low speed compression of the fork 3/4 from full stiff, and this setting takes out most of the suspension bob up front. I also turn the propedal of my RP3 to the strongest setting and this gives me the right pedalling platform for that type of climbing. I raise my seat just enough for proper leg extension.

    On steep, short, and rocky technical climbs; I set my fork with low speed compression dialed 1/4 from full plush and the rebound knob set at 5 clicks from full close. I set my propedal on the middle setting, and my seatpost is lowered by about 20mm from my smooth fire road height.
    Last edited by nickgto; 10-31-2008 at 02:02 PM.
    DH:Mountain Cycle Shockwave 9.5 w/ 888R
    FR:Marin Quake w/ 888RC
    AM:BMC Superstroke 01 w/ 66RC2X

  14. #14
    ♥ ς╥33
    Reputation: longcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    488
    I think even 135mm (crappy tora) is too much when climbing, well it depends on how steep it is but on one particular hill I have to ride up everyday it feels like I'm gonna fall over backwards, and if I stand up it feels like its sucking power from me bouncing up and down.
    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Carbon is a fad.
    Quote Originally Posted by robicycle
    Just lube your ass with asscream and ride for how long you want.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    123
    It depends on bike geometry.

    I have a bike with a 180 mm non-adjustable totem and I don't mind climbing on it in the least bit. Even on the super steep techy sections the only disadvantage I see is the slackish head angle.

  16. #16
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
    Reputation: scrublover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    8,408
    Body english. I find myself moving around and having my weight more forward on the bigger forked/slacker angled bike 66*HA - 180mm fork), as well as using the granny to sit and spin far more than on my hardtail. Which has a 160mm fork.

    It's that fine balance of maintaining rear wheel traction and no bringing the front wheel up/getting it too floppy. Experiment a bit, and try the football humping thing. Moving forward a bit on the seat helps on its own as well, though not so hot if you don't have a decently padded up saddle nose...
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  17. #17
    4od
    4od is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    29
    I have a big chunky Domain 302. For climbing I usually don't either bother to drop down the travel.

    I think a good balance between shock/fork and decent bump threshold/Pro-Pedal/lockout on the shock are more important than having a short fork up front.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Broccoli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,769
    Quote Originally Posted by first.hander
    Does anyone climb with a 160mm fork? More specifically a marz. 66 rc3?

    Any opinions on this? I want to do freeride stuff, but don't want to shuttle with the "cheaters".

    I drop my Wotan down to 120mm with a press of a lever, turn platform on, and it climbs like an XC bike (well, if an XC bike was 35lb). I also use Crank Brothers headset that is another 5mm lower in front then most others)

    Magura Wotan, Lyric 2-step, TALAS 36 are made for this.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    59
    You should be able to pedal it OK, its all about technique. Insert the seat into your butt (to get your weight forward) and pedal nice and smooth.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Luigiugueto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,491
    Get used to it, what bike are you pedalling up a hill with a 66??
    The bike's geometry will have a major roll as well..

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    46
    Thanks for the responses. I actually made a typo and it's supposed to be 180mm of travel. It's going to be on a Canfield brothers CanDiggle.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wormvine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,163
    I have a 66RC2X (180mm) on my 6point. Puts HA at 67deg with a 14.2" BB height. I climb a lot with this bike. I had a 66sl ata and would lower the fork but I just didn't see any real difference so I went to the fixed 180mm RC2X. The front end will want to lift on the steepest of climbs but all I do is move forward and the front stays down. I have a climb on a local trail that is utterly brutal. It's smooth but sooooo steep. My bike does fine when I position myself more forward. The hard part is not puking my lungs out when I reach the top!

    I am running:
    IH 6point
    DHX5-air
    Hope Pro2/DT 5.1d wheelset
    66 RC2X
    Shimano 08' XT brakes
    37-38lbs
    Go for the 180mm fork. If you want the plush travel, you will adjust your riding style to make it work. I love my 66RC2X.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Luigiugueto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,491
    Those CanDiggle have adjustable geometry right?
    You should be fine.
    How much does she weigh?

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13



  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wormvine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,163
    Is that Marzocchi's new travel adjust system!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •