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  1. #1
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    chain wear and tear

    I've owned my specialized enduro for 2 months with 6 to 10 rides, of 200 vertical feet single track trail. Should I need to replace the the chain??? The bike shop I purchased it from said it was out by .4 and damage would be done to the cassette .5 and above. I rode my old rocky oxygen for 11 years, removed 1 link after 6 months and replaced it after 7 yrs.

  2. #2
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    It's hard to believe that any chain would wear that quickly. If the chain has indeed worn that quickly I would keep an eye on it and just replace it with a much better chain in the next month or so. If I had my guess the shops chain checker is worn and indicating a worn chain sooner than is actually happening.

  3. #3
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
    Reputation: crisillo's Avatar
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    most chain checker give "very early warnings".. so take it with a grain of salt...

    also watch that you don't crosschain.. as this improves the chain's life...

  4. #4
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    Sounds like a park chain checker tool measurement.

    I have one new chains start at about .25 they are worn out at 1.0.

    This corresponds to 0.25% streach and 1.0% streach.

    The wear plateaus then seems to wear more quickly.

    You can check the streach with a ruler (calipers are best).

    You have worn (.4-.25)/.75=20% of the life.

    Mud and grit can wear a chain very fast.

    Industrially 3% wear is used, but the sprokets are changed at this time.

    Bikes 1% wear to keep efficiency high and get one or two cassttes and rings per chain.

  5. #5
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    nobody else likely to say it.....so I will......

    don't buy SRam chains. I love SRam for everything else, but their chains suck big time- even their high end chains..... I don't think they have much QC with the folks they get to make them or something.

    I have had many issues with them, most notably just a few weeks ago. Could not get the bike to shift right.....I bought new cassette, new rear dérailleur, new cables, new chain rings while I was at it.....just to find it was that 'brand spanking new' high end chain....put an XTR on it and wha-la...include that with SRams propensity to break, and the deal was sealed...never again an SRam chain.

    On my personal bike I ride most often, I would break a chain once every three months...when I swapped to XTR, I have ridden the same chain for over a year now.

    As much as it pains me to say- Shimano is heads and shoulders above the crowd. They wear longer, stretch less, and shift better.

    that may be the root of your problem.

  6. #6
    househusband
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    Quote Originally Posted by drewactual
    ...Shimano is heads and shoulders above the crowd. They wear longer, stretch less, and shift better...
    If you think Shimano chains are good, maybe you should try a German Rohloff - the SLT99. They're not cheap, but has a 20% greater pin retention than even the SRAM PC991 Cross-step. I'm a heavy rider and have never had one snap on me and I'm convinced, like you, that a better chain will elongate less and thus lengthen lifespan of chainrings and cassette!

  7. #7
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    Good job! Hear, hear for the Rohloff

    I second the opinion on the Rohloff - unbelievable strength and quality in those chains.

    The bad news is that they are no longer imported into the US; the good news is that if you go to www.eBay.de and type in Rohloff SLT-99, it will come up as a result of the search.

    If you do not read German, look for "9 facht" if you have a 9 speed or "8 facht" if you have an 8 speed.

    Mailed to you from Germany takes about a week. $60.00 US.
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  8. #8
    Five is right out
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior74
    I've owned my specialized enduro for 2 months with 6 to 10 rides, of 200 vertical feet single track trail. Should I need to replace the the chain??? The bike shop I purchased it from said it was out by .4 and damage would be done to the cassette .5 and above. I rode my old rocky oxygen for 11 years, removed 1 link after 6 months and replaced it after 7 yrs.
    Ignore all the posters who are suggesting new and expensive chains for a 2 month old bike

    As the more informed posters have been saying, the chain tools may be conservative or the chain could have come with a little bit of 'stretch' in it already. I measured my chain new, and it had 0.5% stretch. After 6 months of riding, it still measures at 0.5% stretch so it hasn't worn noticeably since then.

    From the Park Tools site:

    "A worn chain shifts poorly and wears sprockets at an accelerated rate. The CC-3 is a "go, no go" gauge designed to accurately indicate when a chain reaches .75% and 1% wear, the points at which most chain manufacturers suggest replacement."

  9. #9
    Birthday Collector
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    I have a hard time believing that the chain is gone after 6 to 10 rides with that little climbing, unless you are riding in a quartz powder quarry. I HAVE toasted a Shitmano chain on my '03 Enduro Pro after about 350 miles of riding. Contrary to what some say here, I have had fantastic results from SRAM chains, if you don't buy the cheapest ones. Rohloff are excellent, as they should be for the $$ required to acquire one. Keep your chain CLEAN and lubed with a good, non-dust attracting lube. I use Boeshield T-9 and have zero chain problems. My last chain (PC-990) lasted a year of moderately heavy use (about 1800 miles) with lots of climbing. It had not worn to the point where the CC-3 chain checker showed it at .75 wear (real close though...) but I decided to replace it before my expensive cassette and rings were worn. The Shimano XTR/Dura Ace quality chains are very good, but I find the the lower grade chains don't hold up that well, and most of the chain breakage cases that come into the shop are Shimano. Keeping it clean and lubed, regardless of make, is one thing that will make a big difference in both performance and wear.

  10. #10
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    I have no experience testing the method, but I ran into this web page through a post in mtbr: http://miketechinfo.com/SRAM/chains2.htm

    Seems like a good method to measure wear manually...
    "Early bird gets the worm", but the second mouse gets the cheese...

  11. #11
    Who are the brain police?
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    Mike T. is spot on. Chain wear devices like the Rohloff are very nice, but err on the side of caution. IMOP, that's a good thing as I don't mind replacing a chain a bit early.

    Actually measuring a chain as show by Mike T. is the most accurate method of measuring chain wear.
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  12. #12
    Hmmmmm
    Reputation: Ericmopar's Avatar
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Sram chains have gone bad...

    My old nickle plated PC- 59s and 69s used to last way longer than the new 900 series chains, which are now only lasting me 3 months before suffering serious stretch and shifting problems. I like the power link for servicing the drivetrain, but don't think I'm buying a Sram chain again any time soon.
    I've had serious wear issues with Sram cassettes as well. They have to be replaced every time I change out chains, where as, I used to get two chains, to a set of rings and cassette ( about 2000 miles ) with Shimano components before having to overhaul the whole drivetrain. This is in the desert with a lot of sand and low humidity which dries out the lubes.

    In all fairness though, I don't think anyone's parts are as reliable as they were.

    If this trend keeps up, I'll have to stop mountain biking, because I won't be able to afford to maintain the bike any longer.

    Later, Eric
    "I thought of that while riding my bike."
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    Peace and Long Rides...

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