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Thread: carrera centos?

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    carrera centos?

    Hey all, so i know what some guys are like with halfords bikes, but i have been riding a Carrea Centos for a while and i reckon it is on par if not outperforming other, higher end models. This is backed up by my recent visit to a few trail centers where i was passing many riders on higher end models from like likes of specialized and kona. Now, my question is, Is a 120mm travel hardtail carrera centos suited to AM riding or trail. I have ridden freeride comfortably aswell as long xc rides all day on this bike.
    Heres a link to the bike in question, Halfords | Carrera Centos Limited Edition Mountain Bike 2012 - 20"

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    This explains some of the differences between frames designed for different disciplines...

    Cross country (XC) mountain bikes are designed primarily around the discipline of cross country racing. Cross country racing with its emphasis on climbing as well as speed and endurance demands bikes that are both lightweight and efficient. In the 1980s and early 1990s XC mountain bikes typically consisted of a lightweight steel hardtail frame with rigid forks. Throughout the 1990s XC bikes evolved to incorporate lightweight aluminium frames and short travel (65 to 110 mm) front suspension forks. Recently full suspension designs have become more prevalent, and the use of advanced carbon fiber composites has allowed bike designers to produce full suspension designs under 10 kg. Full suspension bikes such as the Specialized Epic and the Mérida Ninety Two have been successfully used to win the World Cross Country Championships. The geometry of Cross Country bikes favours climbing ability and fast responses over descending and stability and as a result typical head angles are 70–71° Although intended for off-road use, Cross Country mountain bikes with their emphasis on lightweight construction are not designed for use on the most steep or severe terrain.

    "Trail" Bikes are a development of XC bikes that are generally used by recreational mountain bikers either at purpose built "Trail centers" or on natural off-road trails. They usually have around 5" (120-140 mm) of travel, weigh 11 to 15 kilograms (24 to 33 lb), and have geometries slightly slacker than XC bikes, though not as slack as AM bikes. Examples include The Giant Trance, the Trek Fuel EX series, the Specialized Stumpjumper FSR, and others. With less of an emphasis on weight, Trail Bikes are typically built to handle rougher terrain than dedicated XC bikes while having slacker head angles (69-68°) which provides greater stability while descending.

    Enduro/all-mountain (AM) bikes bridge the gap between cross-country and freeride bikes, such as the Trek Remedy series, Specialized enduro, typically weighing between 13 to 16 kilograms (29 to 35 lb). These bikes tend to feature greater suspension travel, frequently as much as 6 inches (150 mm) or 7" of front and rear travel, often adjustable on newer mid- and high-end bikes. They are designed to be able to climb and descend well, these bikes are intended to be ridden on all-day rides involving steep climbs and steep descents, hence the term 'all-mountain'.

    Downhill (DH) bikes typically have eight or more inches (200 mm) of suspension travel. They are built with frames that are strong, yet light, which often requires the use of more expensive alloys and very recently, carbon fiber. In the past few years, lighter downhill bikes have been getting below the 40 lbs mark (18 kg). Due to their typically large or high gears, long, plush travel and slack geometry angles, Downhill bikes are ideal only for riding down dedicated downhill trails and race courses. Downhill bikes have the most sag of Mountain Bikes to get ample traction to go fast over bumpy trails. Head Angles are often as slack as 63 degrees. Several types of bicycle speed records have been registered downhill. Due to the high-speed nature of downhill riding most bikes only have one chain ring in the front, a large bash guard and a chain guide, though many racers are now using chain guides without bash guards to reduce weight. Some manufacturers have experimented with designs featuring internal gearboxes built directly into the frame construction. This modification eliminates the need for the rear derailleur mechanism but has not been embraced due to durability issues with the gearbox during the stresses of a DH race.

    Freeride (FR) mountain bikes are similar to downhill bikes, but with less emphasis on weight and more on strength. Freeride bikes tend to have ample suspension and typically have at least 7 inches (180 mm) of travel. The components are built from stronger, consequently heavier, materials. They can be ridden uphill, but are inefficient and their moderately slack head tube angles make them difficult to maneuver while angled up a hill or traveling at a low speed. They are effective on technical downhill trails. Frame angles are typically steeper than those found in downhill bikes. This enhances maneuverability over and around small objects. Freeride bikes typically range in weight from 14 to 20 kilograms (31 to 44 lb). The most durable freeride bikes are often too heavy and have too much suspension to be ridden uphill as comfortably as other less-sturdy models, although newer, more expensive bikes come with suspension specifically designed to make them easier to ride uphill.

    its not really suitable for anything too heavy i own this bike aswell and am very impressed with it on and offroad and it can take a fair bit of hammering on moderately bumpy trails ive been down a few heavy trails on mine aswell and it handled it well enough but would advise something heavier duty for jumps drop offs or any seriously fast or aggressive off road riding the geometry of an xc frame isnt built for strength its built for lightness.... but for most applications ive found mine to be fine its a good all rounder.

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    also its no good looking for info and reviews etc on this bike because there isnt any except halfords website id like to hear from other people who own this bike and theyre experiences with it i was thinking of doing a good detailed review on it after another few months of riding it as there doesnt seem to be any in depth views on this bike.....watch this space!

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    this is mine
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails carrera centos?-centos.jpg  

    Last edited by LIVZY; 09-01-2012 at 10:36 AM.

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    handlebar brake levers grips and stem upgrade
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails carrera centos?-carrera-centos.jpg  


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    Honestly can't tell you which category it falls in - looks more XC than AM to me, but since there's no geometry sheet on the halfords page you posted there's not much more to go on.
    To be fair, carrera's have become a decent brand - when I first got into mtb they were very much entry-level-only (by which I mean entry level for bikes built to take offroad abuse, I'm not counting things like apollo's which are largely look-alike toys), where now they've expanded into some higher end areas.
    As far as halfords as a chain of shops goes... there are good ones and bad ones (and the same goes for evans, too), some have staff that really know what they're doing and some the staff are very much off-the-street and know only what they've been trained to know (generally low-end stuff as that's what they sell most of).


    Passing other riders isn't necessarily down to the bike (infact, in most cases it won't be) - you'll meet a wide range of people at trailcenters (on all grades of trail) from beginners to weekend-warriors to racers... some will be quick, some will be very very slow.
    Just because someone has a nice bike doesn't mean they're going to be super quick - some people have the expendable income to buy nice bikes and will do so even though they're not riding competitively, some will buy bikes with more suspension than their riding requires purely for comfort, etc.


    This is a very american-centric forum, you won't find many that have even heard of halfords/carrera here, though you will pick up plenty of more general bike info, maintenance info and the likes so welcome.


    Fwiw, I don't own a carrera - I had one about 6 years ago which was stolen (at knifepoint), turned out to be rather fortunate as the insurance replacement was a far better bike (a felt q820 - threw in a touch of extra money to get it, mind) and was really what got me into riding.
    Still have that felt now, though it almost never gets ridden anymore.

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    to update, i have now upgraded the fork to a 140mm rockshox sektor. any more thoughts?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ripper. View Post
    to update, i have now upgraded the fork to a 140mm rockshox sektor. any more thoughts?
    Good fork, good value too - wouldn't put anything longer travel on than that, manufacturer spec + 20mm is usually ok, beyond that all bets are off.

    That said, I wouldn't necessarily put that longer fork on in the first place - it depends on the geometry to begin with... if the bottom bracket is already high, a longer fork will make it higher (but since I can't find a geometry sheet for that bike, I just don't know whether it's a good idea or not).

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    it feels alot more stable geometry wise on the downs and since the fork can be crushed to 100 theres no compromise on the uphills.

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    might be worth noting that the carrera vengeance has the same frame and this bike comes with 100mm travel....would that mean that the centos is already +20mm more than what the frame was designed for?

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    not sure about the centos, but i'm riding the vulcan (it's fairly similar spec to the centos) and it rides a dream. I can't imagine why people pay 4-500 pounds more for bikes of practically the same spec. i'd say the centos is whatever you want it to be, it was probably intended as a XC bike, but by all means if you stick some 140mm forks on it and tweak it to your preferences with extras like bars and seat ect then it could easily be an AM bike. my vulcan is used for all sorts, road, trail, XC and AM, i've even tried a bit of dirt jumps on it and it worked fine, but the way you;ve set yours up, it could be anything

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    So, as it stands the bike has an upgraded rock shox sektor 140mm, a kore b1b stem, some race face evolve downhill bars, lock on grips and a new front mech. I now consider the bike to be set up in an AM hardtail configuration. ( would i be right in this)

    The new spec seems to help on trail center reds and when freeriding.
    Thanks for all the advice so far.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripper. View Post
    So, as it stands the bike has an upgraded rock shox sektor 140mm, a kore b1b stem, some race face evolve downhill bars, lock on grips and a new front mech. I now consider the bike to be set up in an AM hardtail configuration. ( would i be right in this)
    .
    Depends what the geometry was initially and how much it's changed...
    Allmountain in any bike is more about geometry than travel. The parts may be suitable for an AM hardtail, yet if the geometry was firmly in the xc camp to begin with, you still won't have arrived at AM (and won't without a frame change).
    You're probably about 1 degree slacker (though it could be more... or less.. depending on the relative axle-to-crown measurements of the two forks), but if the head angle with the original was 69 or 70, you're hardly looking at something especially slack.


    If the frame isn't strong enough to handle forks that long (it should be ok) then it'll break at the headtube before too long - probably won't happen, but if you're riding it very aggressively then you'll find out...


    If you really wanted to make it an AM hardtail... buy a 456-evo frame (a steel steal at 200 quid) and swap all your parts over onto it - then you'd have a much tougher frame, almost certainly several degrees slacker and yet with the bottom bracket nice and low.


    Still, if it's made it more fun to ride, then it's been worth it!

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    not sure bout that frame, i reckon im just gonna rip this as i like it how it is atm and im roasting other riders out on the trails quite comportably in this rig. tbh for me, the frame is slack enough for the downs and im more interested in it's uphill weight center.

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    If it works for you, that's cool - I hope the frame holds up (which it should - it just depends what it was originally designed for... if the frame is shared across models and 120mm is the max it's designed to handle you may have taken it too far.. you just don't know).

    You never know until you try something slacker whether you'll like it or not.

    If you lived anywhere near me, I'd be quite happy to swap bikes for a ride (or just use one of my others and let you try my slack hardtail) and if you ever want to try riding in the south midlands or south wales, I'm more than happy to hold to that offer (just PM me).
    As far as uphill goes, you might be surprised how slacker hardtails climb - I was.

    Until you experience a different kind of bike, you won't know quite how it feels - then again, if what you have suits you and is putting a great big smile on your face then rock on!


    And heck, if you do eventually break it (if you're riding very roughly, you probably will eventually - the strength of the frame will only determined "when") you can always upgrade then... but breaking something major can result in a serious wreck and a serious loss of confidence.
    If you're doing well and advancing (skillwise) quickly, I'd recommend upgrading the frame to something tougher (the frame is the last thing you want to break!)... but it's up to you - and good luck whichever way you choose to go.


    Ps.
    As one UK rider to another... if you don't already use Superstar components it's worth looking at their website, I've saved serious amounts of money on brake pads (though I don't buy much else there, it's largely due to snobbery and lack of reviews...)


    If I had any current pics of my bike I'd post them - unfortunately, I don't.

    I have videos of some spots that are local/semi-local to me if you're interested, though they'll take some significant travel from where you are.
    Last edited by EnglishT; 09-21-2012 at 03:50 PM.

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    cool, their website looks ok, btw how do you post photos on here because iv just taken a photo of the bike as it is now complete

  17. #17
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    Several ways....

    You can upload (if you look below in the "additional options" area, if you're on the advanced reply page, you should see a button marked "upload images") to this site, or you can upload to a photo hosting site, and get a direct image link (rightclick "copy image location") and put in an image link (squarebrakets: [ img ]link[ /img ] but without the spaced... or click the little picture button above the text body on the advanced reply page).

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    Nice red bike bro...


    Last edited by photomania01; 09-25-2012 at 02:52 AM.

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    There she is

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    just got a centos today from ebay and seems to be fine however how do u operate the gears, ive not been on newer bikes for a fair while but this has a lever gear system and as soon as you turn it to gear 1 it doesnt change again so seems to be stuck on a low gears

    any help? cheers

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