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  1. #1
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    Are carbon bars worth it?

    I'm looking to upgrade my current bar, a Bontrager Earl-690mm, to a carbon riser bar. The Easton Havoc looks like a winner. 174g and 711mm is really close to what I want. My main concern is are carbon bars brittle in anyway? If it hits rocks, logs, concrete, etc., will the bar be able to take it or will it usually crack?

  2. #2
    usually cranky
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    hit as in ram your bars into it or hit as in ride over? if option #1 i wouldnt do that to any bar and certainly not a $150 bar, if #2 you will be fine.

  3. #3
    Axe
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    I think if your bars are hitting rocks, logs, or concrete then you have some issues beyond the brittle nature of carbon.

    Install it properly, and it is pretty darn bulletproof. Use carbon assembly paste and do not overclamp stem and brakes, that's about it.. Good end plugs are useful..

  4. #4
    T.W.O
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    I just don't think they add a huge weight reduction significance for the price difference between alloy bars. Cut down on the rolling weight if anything, but if you want to spend the money for bling then that's fine. Easton's stuff holds up fine, and they have a good warranty if it doesn't.

    If it were me I'd rather upgrade my brakes or something else that is important.

  5. #5
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    I ran carbon bars on my road bike and mtb for a couple of years. I am back to aluminum bars, IMO they are not worth it. Carbon is cool but meh.

  6. #6
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    dampening

    Hey,
    I just switched to Easton carbon bars. One benefit is that high frequency vibrations are dampened by the carbon bars. Is it worth the extra money? hmmmm.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    hit as in ram your bars into it or hit as in ride over? if option #1 i wouldnt do that to any bar and certainly not a $150 bar, if #2 you will be fine.
    I meant hit as in falling. I would never purposely ram something with my bike, but I push myself pretty hard and going down hard is just a part of it. My trails are mostly dirt, but there are lots of rocks and some logs that I've gone down on before. It's not like every time I ride I go down, but it happens.

  8. #8
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    The concrete is when I'm when I messing around on campus trying (key word is trying) to throw 180s and 3s. This only a small part of my riding when its too dark to see the trails, but it's still fun

  9. #9
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    I went with easton monkeylite xc highrise bars an love em. But, once I took the stock alum. bars off, an weighed both of em..... minimal at best difference. one thing about easton... 5 year warranty on alum bars an lifetime on carbon. I figured it would've been the other way around but.. when I asked, that's what they told me.
    determined to put the "mountain" back in "MOUNTAIN BIKING!!!" "HIT IT!"
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  10. #10
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastcars12
    The concrete is when I'm when I messing around on campus trying (key word is trying) to throw 180s and 3s. This only a small part of my riding when its too dark to see the trails, but it's still fun
    I think you need cheaper parts on that bike. Does not matter what they are made of.

    I have my BMX bike for that sort of fun.

  11. #11
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    I have aluminum bars and have never tried carbon - is it a noticeable difference in vibration reduction with the carbon? That's the only benefit I'd be looking for.

  12. #12
    g3h6o3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastcars12
    I'm looking to upgrade my current bar, a Bontrager Earl-690mm, to a carbon riser bar. The Easton Havoc looks like a winner. 174g and 711mm is really close to what I want. My main concern is are carbon bars brittle in anyway? If it hits rocks, logs, concrete, etc., will the bar be able to take it or will it usually crack?
    I use a MonkeyLite DH bar on my AM build. They now renamed it to Haven and I think you speak of this bar as it's 711mm wide and 170g versus 750mm & 235g for the Havoc...

    Anyways, I had a crash one day on a tight turn leading to a rocky descent. My front tire washed out, I went down and the bike flew away stumbling down the rocky descent. The bars took the biggest hit, a rock went straight through my grips, shredding them and scratched the carbon underneath. I was afraid of finding a hole in the carbon but after removing the grips it turns out they have a small scratch at most. I reinstalled the grips, used epoxy to patch the hole and make them usable (they we're brand new) and kept on riding the bars without problems.

    So you don't have to worry about it, they're as strong as anything well made out there.
    Last edited by PissedOffCil; 04-18-2011 at 11:10 AM.
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  13. #13
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil
    So you don't have to worry about it, they're as strong as anything well made out there.
    He most definitely needs to worry about his parts no matter what they are made of. He rides street on his MTB. Folk blow up heat treated cro-moly bits doing that - say nothing about $150 fancy-pants carbon.

  14. #14
    g3h6o3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe
    He most definitely needs to worry about his parts no matter what they are made of. He rides street on his MTB. Folk blow up heat treated cro-moly bits doing that - say nothing about $150 fancy-pants carbon.
    They're as strong as any other well made bar out there. That's my conclusion. You can break anything in a bad landing. Your point is irrelevant to the discussion.
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  15. #15
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil
    They're as strong as any other well made bar out there. That's my conclusion. You can break anything in a bad landing. Your point is irrelevant to the discussion.
    They are most definitely not as strong to a sharp blows on edge and repeated abrasion compared to parts made with urban jumping in mind and cost is most definitely a major part of this discussion.

    Bad landing is a bad landing. Riding street that is situation as usual. Big difference.

    I ride carbon bars and do not worry about their strength at all, but then I do not learn to do tricks on that bike, and cost is not a factor.

    OP needs to decide how often and how hard are his street sessions and select parts accordingly. Sure is nothing wrong with Easton for MTB use.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe
    They are most definitely not as strong to a sharp blows on edge and repeated abrasion compared to parts made with urban jumping in mind and cost is most definitely a major part of this discussion.

    Bad landing is a bad landing. Riding street that is situation as usual. Big difference.

    I ride carbon bars and do not worry about their strength at all, but then I do not learn to do tricks on that bike, and cost is not a factor.

    OP needs to decide how often and how hard are his street sessions and select parts accordingly. Sure is nothing wrong with Easton for MTB use.
    wait, carbon isn't perfect for everybody doing anything????!!!!!

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcar964
    I have aluminum bars and have never tried carbon - is it a noticeable difference in vibration reduction with the carbon? That's the only benefit I'd be looking for.
    I find it to be barely noticeable, but after a few hours of DH my hands/fingers aren't aching like they were with an aluminum bar.

  18. #18
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    Carbon bars have significantly more elastic properties before the ultimate strength is reached. Compared to aluminum.
    The carbon weave, depending upon the preparation, is significantly stronger than aluminum in absolute terms as well. Like 100x or more than 6061-t6.
    Aluminum can take hard hits and small area damage without total failure on a lot of situations where carbon would fail.

    the only bar I've damaged beyond reasonable usability was a coda aluminum flat bar. Torque from cranking on the bar ends while climbing bent the crap out of the lady couple inches.
    I ride carbon bars on my xc hard tail and my spesh enduro now and likely won't ride any other material unless I get a dj or full free ride set up.

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