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  1. #1
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    Cannondale Jekyll overpriced?

    Im looking into a new f/s am bike, and I was considering the Jekyll 3... until i looked it up online and saw it on sale for 7,499 heres the link
    http://www.basicbikes.co.nz/bikes/ca..._jekyll_3.aspx

    Is that a mistake possibly? I cant see how this bike can be that expensive.

    While were on the topic, any advice on a good AM for around $3000?

  2. #2
    rmi
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    IMHO, all Cannondales are overpriced. You can get more bike with other brands.

    Ryan

  3. #3
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    Of course it's overpriced. Most everything about cycling has been for the past decade or so.

    Once the sport/hobby became popular with folks with enough disposable income to spend relatively freely, prices for bikes, parts, and accessories all went through the roof. This happens with anything that can remotely be called a hobby.

    And that Jekyll 3? They'll sell some at that price, and I suppose if someone has that kind of cash free for such a purchase it might even be worth it to them. Just the way things are - and are likely to stay.
    If you go looking for trouble, you can be sure it's gaining from behind.

  4. #4
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    At that price I would start looking at flights to the states, combine a North American bike trip and pick up your new ride, that would buy you an Ultimate here in the US.

    Seriously come to the states (cough cough, West Virginia) and make it a destination vacation, and fly back with a Jekyll 1 for almost the same money.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by dblvanos
    At that price I would start looking at flights to the states, combine a North American bike trip and pick up your new ride, that would buy you an Ultimate here in the US.

    Seriously come to the states (cough cough, West Virginia) and make it a destination vacation, and fly back with a Jekyll 1 for almost the same money.
    might have to take up that offer, that price is ridiculous though

  6. #6
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    I second that, do some research with cities that you would want to go ride in. Then call around to all the Cannondale dealers around that city for the lowest price quote on the Jekyll. Which ever shop/city got the lowest price go to that. Chances are you'll end up in California as "Mikes Bike" sells the most cdales in the USA and gets the lowest prices because of that. Still call around to all the Cdale dealers because you never know, you might find some shop thats cheaper.

    Start planning a family vacation my friend!

  7. #7
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    That model is around $4k in the US although at that price point you might as well get the Carbon 2 model.

    I have a Jekyll Carbon 1 arriving around the beginning of January.
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  8. #8
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    If you want it in January then you'd pay premium, but if you can wait, then it would come down considerably. Same with Moto, it was so expensive when it first came out, now it's cheap.

    I skipped a couple of generations of Cannondale already, my last 2 was Prophet, and Rush, I think I'd get the Jekyll though, if everything works half as well as they claimed then it would be a sweet AM bike

  9. #9
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    Pete Denk designed it.

    It's in his contract that anything he designs must be ludicrously priced and impractical, if it isn't his ego contracts to a singularity and takes the rest of him with it...

  10. #10
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    Every time someone comes up with a new suspension design, they think it's worth the bike's weight in diamonds. They try to sucker in a few early adopters with fancy marketing and something to lust after, then when they're not selling many, they drop them down to the reasonable price point they should have been in the first place. Cannondale will lower the price by the end of 2011 once they realize they're not the coolest thing since sliced bread. The markup on that now is still stupid high. There's plenty of room to drop and still maintain a good margin.

    It's not just bikes. Look at the TV industry. 1080P used to be a premium. Now it's pretty standard on almost every HDTV. Prices are now thousands cheaper. But then they couldn't charge as much so they had to release new things to charge a premium for, like LED and 3D. 3D is such a money grabbing game. Pay a premium for the TV to replace the HDTV you just bought within the last few years, then pay $200-$400 for each set of glasses for every person in your household. F that.

    In any case, when the 2012s come out, there will be plenty of deals left on 2011s if you know where to look. If you're not a common size, you can get even luckier. Anyone who rides S or XL can almost always get some sweet end of year deals on leftover stock. Medium and Large are the common sizes that tend to sell out first.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaeckerX1
    Every time someone comes up with a new suspension design, they think it's worth the bike's weight in diamonds. They try to sucker in a few early adopters with fancy marketing and something to lust after, then when they're not selling many, they drop them down to the reasonable price point they should have been in the first place. Cannondale will lower the price by the end of 2011 once they realize they're not the coolest thing since sliced bread. The markup on that now is still stupid high. There's plenty of room to drop and still maintain a good margin.

    It's not just bikes. Look at the TV industry. 1080P used to be a premium. Now it's pretty standard on almost every HDTV. Prices are now thousands cheaper. But then they couldn't charge as much so they had to release new things to charge a premium for, like LED and 3D. 3D is such a money grabbing game. Pay a premium for the TV to replace the HDTV you just bought within the last few years, then pay $200-$400 for each set of glasses for every person in your household. F that.

    In any case, when the 2012s come out, there will be plenty of deals left on 2011s if you know where to look. If you're not a common size, you can get even luckier. Anyone who rides S or XL can usually get some sweet end of year deals on leftover stock. Medium and Large are the common sizes that tend to sell out first.

    While it's definitely true in digital world, it's not as much apply to analog world. Digital get 2x speed, 2x smaller/bigger, 2x capacity at half the price on the next generation, it doesn't really apply to analog. Tubes amp of the same brand does not get cheaper, it gets more expensive

    If you can wait til 2012 for the 2011 Jekyll, it would be cheap(er) for sure, it's hard to bargain for product that's hot or not available yet. Not to mention the dollars is very weak now, $100 now worth less than $100 last year or the year before.

  12. #12
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    I always wanted to try a bike with a lefty fork. I've checked out cannondale a few different times, & always ended up going elsewhere, because they seem to be priced higher for equal components on other bikes....
    oh well....
    Riding.....

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885
    While it's definitely true in digital world, it's not as much apply to analog world. Digital get 2x speed, 2x smaller/bigger, 2x capacity at half the price on the next generation, it doesn't really apply to analog. Tubes amp of the same brand does not get cheaper, it gets more expensive

    If you can wait til 2012 for the 2011 Jekyll, it would be cheap(er) for sure, it's hard to bargain for product that's hot or not available yet. Not to mention the dollars is very weak now, $100 now worth less than $100 last year or the year before.
    Are you telling me you still use a CRT? I was speaking of the vast majority of HDTVs.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaeckerX1
    Are you telling me you still use a CRT? I was speaking of the vast majority of HDTVs.
    No but I have a McIntosh tube amp. What's a CRT?, is it similar to URT?

  15. #15
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    went to a lbs that stocks cannondales, they say the jekyll 3 will run around 4100 here in Canada. Thats still damn expensive...

    Looking at a Spec StumpJumper FSR elite instead. The same bikeshop is selling them for 3299. Sure, the jekyll is a little better specd, and has a little extra travel, but just cant justify the 4000+ price tag...

    Any other advice for a decent AM rig in the price range of the Spec? Was looking at a yeti 575 as well.

  16. #16
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    Will be going to cali for a wedding in May, and checked out the price of a SJ FSR Elite on Mikesbikes, and they're going for 2699... thats quite the difference, may have to buy in Cali

  17. #17
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    Not quite sure how you go from a $4k bike to a $2.5k bike. They do offer lower end models of the jekyll the 4 and 5 that would be comparable to the specialized in price only. The specialized is an old design as is the 575 and both have been around a while as 140mm rigs for mainly XC use. The enduro is more of an all mountain rig from specialized.

    Seems like you need to decide do want more of an XC rig or an all mountain rig.

    A transition covert, trek remedy, santa cruz nomad, or ibis hd would all be good all mountain choices. I was not impressed with the ride of a specialized.
    Live to ride!

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  18. #18
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    If you were looking at the Jekyll with serious interest in no way should you be looking at the SJ right now. that is a completely different bike. If the Jekyll proves to be too much money for you then you should look at the Scott Genius. That is a comparable bike to the Jekyll and might offer a lower price.

  19. #19
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    I know it seems like a bit of a stretch, but i dont know if i really need 150mm of travel enough to justify spending an extra 1000 on it. I know the SJ and the Jekyll arent the same bike, but it seems that the SJ would fit my needs, and sits at a much better price point.

    Maybe im being ignorant here, and correct me if im wrong, but i dont know if 10mm makes that large of a difference in riding.

    Ok, i threw in the possibility of a Diamondback Mission 3 in there, as its a good price at mikes bikes for 3399
    Last edited by Marko G; 11-17-2010 at 08:01 AM.

  20. #20
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    I would say every mm of efficient travel makes a difference. Ever since mountain bikes started having suspension people have been wondering do I need that extra 10 to 20mm.

    My take when I buy a new bike is to get the greatest amount of efficient travel that is available at the time because in a couple of years all bikes will have that amount of travel. Right now I think 150 to 160 is the spot to be.
    Live to ride!

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilycook
    I would say every mm of efficient travel makes a difference. Ever since mountain bikes started having suspension people have been wondering do I need that extra 10 to 20mm.

    My take when I buy a new bike is to get the greatest amount of efficient travel that is available at the time because in a couple of years all bikes will have that amount of travel. Right now I think 150 to 160 is the spot to be.
    For serious AM riding with large drops I'd say yes, but I still think the sweet spot for all around riding is 120-140, provided it's a good suspension design with efficient travel and a stout frame. If you're thinking you need a 35 pound bike for everyday trail riding, even highly technical with some jumps/drops, I'm thinking that's a bit overkill. 10 years ago almost everyone was riding the same trails on hardtails, not to mention the dirt jumper crowd. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to have a 160 mm travel bike for some very specific types of terrain, but for most of the things I ride (even in Colorado and Utah) it's overkill. If you can only have 1 bike for all around riding, I'd recommend going for something in the 140 range. It's not just weight either. I know that you can build up a 160mm travel frame fairly light with some pricey components. Sometimes those taller forks (if they don't have a travel adjust) make climbing steep terrain a bit more difficult.

    I will admit that it's really amazing how far suspension design and long travel bikes have come though, especially regarding weight and pedaling efficiency. It's really not out of the question to use a bigger bike for everyday riding nowadays, so if you need the bigger bike for your riding, go for it. Just don't think you need a ton of travel because that is the trend these days. Fit your bike to what you ride. You'd look awfully dumb riding a 160mm travel bike on a lake side bike path, for example.
    Last edited by BaeckerX1; 11-17-2010 at 09:53 AM.
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  22. #22
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    Sj Evo

    145mm back 150 front

    $3900 USD


  23. #23
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    Don't sell the stumpy short, mine was a beast on the trails. If you're keeping it on the ground and are more concerned with downhill speed than climbing, its pretty sweet.

    IMHO, I think that buying a 120mm frame and then replacing the rear with a rp23 and a travel adjust fork in the front (pike maybe) would be the ticket. It won't do big drops if you're heavy, but its a lot more bike than most people will tell you. You can use it for AM if you keep your drops short, and don't launch it too hard.
    Just another redneck with a bike

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlockinz
    Don't sell the stumpy short, mine was a beast on the trails. If you're keeping it on the ground and are more concerned with downhill speed than climbing, its pretty sweet.

    IMHO, I think that buying a 120mm frame and then replacing the rear with a rp23 and a travel adjust fork in the front (pike maybe) would be the ticket. It won't do big drops if you're heavy, but its a lot more bike than most people will tell you. You can use it for AM if you keep your drops short, and don't launch it too hard.
    Yeah, I think it's important when asking about bikes and which one is right for you to adequately describe your riding style. Different people have widely differing opinions of what "All Mountain" riding really is, so this is an important factor to consider. If you're doing massive drops you're going to need a bigger, burlier bike. I think that's more free-ride territory than all mountain, but that's not really the point.

    Yeah it's nice to have more bike than you need sometimes, but it can also suck. Sure you can do it, but pedaling a 40 pound downhill sled uphill is not ideal, which is why you don't see most people doing it. If you're doing more mellow riding 95% of the time and the other 5% you're at Northstar/Whistler, just rent a bigger bike while you're there. You'll be happier in the long run than trying to find 1 bike to do everything. Or just acquire a quiver of bikes.
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  25. #25
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    I would be getting all over the Jekyll for my one and only bike. Having it in the 90mm mode and 120 up front would make it the ideal bike for most XC trails. Then if you start hitting the rougher downhills you'll have the full 150mm to play with. Jekyll definitely not going to be over kill due to its versatility. Especially with the carbon frame, the weight will be comparable to most trail bikes.

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