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  1. #1
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    Buying an older used Full Suspension

    Hello all,

    I am looking to purchase my first high quality bike to start riding more and go on some decent flatter trails through woods etc.. wanted a bike I can keep for the long haul and maybe upgrade a few things here and there, don't ever plan to get too crazy as far as racing etc..

    The bike I am set to look at is a 2000 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR PRO XC.. have been told it is in great shape and has been stored inside for the past 9 years, not ridden at all... price is $375 no pedals.

    As this is an older full suspension, what should I be looking for when I go inspect it? any key things to check and verify?

    Is this 2000 fsr a good bike to get? has the technology changed much so that i would be MUCH better off getting a newer bike?

    Any help or input is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    No that's a good bike you don't need to buy something more expensive just because it is an older model. I would still buy it if it was in good shape.

    The problem with buying an older model like that is you don't really know what you'll be getting. Everything could look ok, but then you will take it home and it'll start falling apart, that may or may not be the case.

    Just examine the bushings and suspension design very carefully making sure nothing is loose, cracked, etc. Make sure the shock is working on the fork and the rear suspension. Make sure there are no cracks in the frame. I'm sure you will have to replace housing/cables that's usually a given. All in all just look for major wear and if you think there is some, don't buy the bike.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Investmentbiker
    Is this 2000 fsr a good bike to get? has the technology changed much so that i would be MUCH better off getting a newer bike?
    Just regarding this, a bike is a bike. Sure, some things have improved (shock dampening and adjustment on any new shock is probably better), and the geometry might not be as aggressive as some bikes today, but fundamentally it's a bike.

    As far as wear goes, some things like lubricants and plastics, even if unused, will break down over 11 years, so it will at least need some fresh grease and a tune up. Take it for a ride, and If you're really concerned, see if a LBS will look it over for cheap.

  4. #4
    usually cranky
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    $375 for an 11 year old bike. i dont know...

  5. #5
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    I paid $700 for an '02 cannondale jekyll last year and put 600 trail miles on it, zero problems. I might be a little concerned with seals if it sat for 9 years tho.

  6. #6
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    Fork and shock seals will probably need replaced as well as tires and tubes.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the replies..

    How is the stumpjumper fsr pro rated? compared to others? I see it has XT and XTR shimano drivetrain.... have they changed that stuff much or is it essentially the same design over the years? it looks to have the original rear shock.. fox float

    It does not have pedals, but I just bought some wellgo aluminum platforms..

    the seller says it has Panaracer Fire 2.1 kevlar folding tires on it now.. replaced back in 2001?

  8. #8
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    You'd probably need new tires and check the shock/forks seals as for drivetrain it should be ok as long as they are adjusted, feel like spending a bit down the road just change out the cable and housing. Got pic? $375 is a bit high for 11yr old bike that may need more $$ like b-kul said.

  9. #9
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    The problem that you'll run into is that bikes seem to lose value similar to a car. Meaning that they depreciate slower the older they are. You could probably find a newer bike for aittle more money. If I were you, I'd see about spending in the area of $700 on a newer model bike. Hell, you can find a new leftover for under a grand that will likely be a much better buy due to lack of immediate updating needs.

  10. #10
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    Personally, I wouldn't get it. Well not for that price. The bike was good for it's day but 11 years later, it's not as good.

    I don't know what you are going to use it for but since you posted in the All Mountain section, I'm thinking you want to use it as an all mountain bike. Don't think that is a wise idea.

    Betd makes a linkage to bring the travel up to 130 mm but the link costs $161.38 USD. Almost half the cost of the bike itself. Plus it's a V-brake bike. I think Specialized sold a disk adapter but you would probably have little chance of finding one now.

    Trying to upgrade it to a All Mountain bike can be done but not without spending an amount equal to a used All Mountain bike.

    Think about it.

  11. #11
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    If you have someone who knows what to look for, have them check it out. Worst you will be out is $375. Given your just getting back into biking odds are whatever you buy won't be exactly what you want or you will decide biking isn't for you. Kinda like going to Vegas, go into it assuming you may lose $375 --- or you will pick up a lifetime passion.

    Good luck

  12. #12
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    This bike is a classic. If it really was not ridden all those years and is in decent shape, including sprockets etc, it is definitely worth the money. After 10 years you have to replace all cables and all rubber (seals, tyres, tubes) to avoid problems on the trail, so do not judge the bike by this. Check sprockets, shifters, mechs and wheels.

    You may want to visit this forum http://www.retrobike.co.uk/ and ask there as well. They know better what to do.

  13. #13
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    My used hard tail was advertised as "like new" and "stored in a basement for X years". When I saw it, the saddle was sun faded (in a basement?) and torn on one side, saddle post shot, shifters scraped from a serious endo, snapping the plastic cover clean off on one side (guy said "it just fell off I dunno"). Soooo, don't believe the hype.

    (I got the HT for a much lower price, which then went into a full cable replacement, new saddle and saddle post, costing nearly the price of the bike itself. FYI)

  14. #14
    Biking Like Crazy!
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    Just did a review on a 2002 Spec Pro (only goes back that far)
    and it looks likes it doesnt have disc brakes on in.
    That's a deal breaker for me if true!

  15. #15
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    An older bike is a lot like an older car: If it has been cared for and well maintained all these years it might be ok, but if you just let a car/ bike sit unused for years you are asking for problems.
    09 Jamis XCT2 Marzocchi RC3 ti forks, XT/XTR drivetrain, Mavic Crossrides/ Kenda Nevegal DTC=29lbs

  16. #16
    BLAH BLAH
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    If your cool with putting $200 into it than go for it.

    For me, I wont by anything older than 3 years unless its special.
    Whats this line for?

  17. #17
    DIY all the way
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    Quote Originally Posted by Investmentbiker
    Hello all,

    I am looking to purchase my first high quality bike to start riding more and go on some decent flatter trails through woods etc.. wanted a bike I can keep for the long haul and maybe upgrade a few things here and there, don't ever plan to get too crazy as far as racing etc..

    The bike I am set to look at is a 2000 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR PRO XC.. have been told it is in great shape and has been stored inside for the past 9 years, not ridden at all... price is $375 no pedals.

    As this is an older full suspension, what should I be looking for when I go inspect it? any key things to check and verify?

    Is this 2000 fsr a good bike to get? has the technology changed much so that i would be MUCH better off getting a newer bike?

    Any help or input is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
    As I recall, the only issue that bike had back in the day, was the bushings needed replacement frequently. Counting out that, and the limited amount of rear travel, I'd say it's a nice bike.
    A modern shock will set you back like 100$ from Chainreaction or the like.

    I ride a '99 Intense M1 which I am very happy with, but you have to keep in mind that spare parts are getting hard to find for some brands, Ellsworth and Intense are particular bad at supplying spares for their bikes that are more than a few years old, I don't know how it is with older Specialized bikes.


    Magura

  18. #18
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    Its a classic design. The bike LOOKS great just standing there. That said, yes the suspension design within the fsr line has improved considerably. A stumpy today rides nothing like that generation. The components have improved along the way a well...but my xc bike runs 98 vintage xtr and it feels almost as crisp a the new xx I just put on my enduro. The xx is the only group I'd consider upgrading to at this point simply for the adjustable thumb lever position.

    Don't get hung up on the "need" for disc brakes. I've found that the high end avid, xtr, etc...v-brakes work just as well if not better than lower end disc brakes. My xc hard tail has magura raceline d's. The only time I notice a difference in braking is on very extended down hill sections...but that's where the enduro is more fun anyways.
    The fork and shock will 100% need a full service after sitting that long.

  19. #19
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    Yes!

    5 years ago I was a roadie who moved to the mountains and wanted to see if I would get into MTB. Bought used 2000 Stumpy Pro FSR to see if I would get into MTB. Yes I did, so I bought a new bike last spring. The point: this bike was great to see if I would really get into it. I rode it (and still do) all through the mountains of Montana. I have disc brakes on main bikes, but still have caliper on my hardtail, and ride with others who do - in mountains, in Montana. So don't worry about them.

    My take: Yes, $375 for that bike is a good price, and it's a good bike to see how serious you are about riding. If you get the bug and ride a lot, you'll upgrade in a few years.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dietz31684
    I paid $700 for an '02 cannondale jekyll last year and put 600 trail miles on it, zero problems. I might be a little concerned with seals if it sat for 9 years tho.
    Holly **** you got ripped off you can get a nice prophet for a little more.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet bill
    Holly **** you got ripped off you can get a nice prophet for a little more.
    Thanks for chiming in a week later to say what we all thought.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfox90
    Thanks for chiming in a week later to say what we all thought.
    No problem i was shocked and than laughed couldnt help myself

  23. #23
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    haha that post just made laugh

  24. #24
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    I've ridden that bike and its XC. See if you can find a 5" travel bike for around that price. I've seen 2005+ Kona Dawgs with 5" rear travel, propedal 5" front for go for $400-$500. save your money and get some thing thats a good bike. The old specialized fsr's are XC rigs with poor bearign life, and terrible geometry for anything tech or steep.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by eshew
    I've ridden that bike and its XC. See if you can find a 5" travel bike for around that price. I've seen 2005+ Kona Dawgs with 5" rear travel, propedal 5" front for go for $400-$500. save your money and get some thing thats a good bike. The old specialized fsr's are XC rigs with poor bearign life, and terrible geometry for anything tech or steep.
    Contrary to popular belief, 5" is not the holy grail of mountain bike design.
    Why would you assume an XC bike with XC geometry, isn't EXACTLY what this guy wants or needs? Just because it doesn't match your preference?

    The good thing about an FSR is it is a proven design that is still around. There are lots of old FSR's still on the trail, although the ones that are that age have usually been upgraded to more modern forks, shifting, tires etc.
    I can vaguely remember way back to the year 2000, and from what I recall, people were having a heck of a good time on those Y2K bikes!

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