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  1. #1
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    Blueprints for backyard drop?

    Anybody build a drop/ledge in their backyard. I want something to practice on during the winter. It would really be cool if I could design something that i can raise as I get better. Maybe start at a foot and go up to 3. I have some ideas in my head but wondered if anybody already had some great designs to share.

    (thought this fit in all mountain more than freeride because they would mock a 3 foot drop )

  2. #2
    {Believeland}
    Reputation: XCkiller's Avatar
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    what i did was find a small hill from 3 to 5 feet tall and carve out a drop into once of its sides (start small at first), this way you can always dig out more and more until your dropping to flat ground/height of the hill, i like this more than actually building something becasue i will never have to worry about tearing down old drops once i am read to increase in size.
    i wouldnt suggest this if your making a drop any bigger than 4 feet though, it would really suck w/o a backhoe
    ride fast.... live slow

  3. #3
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    I have been thinking about this some more, and I think I might just get a bunch of wooden pallets set them two of them end to end for the top. At fist it might just be two or three pallets tall, and two long. I can always add more pallets when I get better (to make it taller). At some point I will build a ramp when the pallet stack gets tall enough.

    My back yard is completely flat so I need to build some sort of wooden structure.

    Any other ideas?

  4. #4
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    Here's one quick idea:





    In a nut shell, you need 2 4x4 treated posts (probably 8' long). Direct bury the posts & tamp the soil you place back in the hole as hard as you can (concrete would be even better). Get a level, mark the center lines of holes in each post at 8" centers (or 12", or whatever you like). Drill the holes with a 1" auger bit.

    You then need two 8' long treated 2x8s. Drill a 1" hole in each, approximately 4" from the end of each board, and just below the center.

    Next comes some decking boards. I've shown 5/4 treated boards, but they may get awfully slick, so cedar or cypress might end up working better. Just make sure they're thick enough to support you on your bike. I'd think 5/4" would be fine if the whole assembly is 2' wide.

    I'd suggest a #8 rebar for the piece running through the whole assembly. Pull it out and adjust the height to suit you.

    You might need to use a shovel and just a bit of dirt to create a transition onto the ramp.

    I could also imagine a slightly fancier setup involving four posts and a couple of good barn door style hinges. You could then create a flat area to launch off of after climbing the ramp.

  5. #5
    Perpetual Hack
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    one quick comment...

    if you do the adjustable ramp thing, make sure you have handlebar clearance on the uprights otherwise you could be flying sans bike...

    michael

  6. #6
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    space the posts like 4 feet wider across, and use a longer bar to hold up the ramp! thats too close to be safe.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by architectx
    Here's one quick idea:





    In a nut shell, you need 2 4x4 treated posts (probably 8' long). Direct bury the posts & tamp the soil you place back in the hole as hard as you can (concrete would be even better). Get a level, mark the center lines of holes in each post at 8" centers (or 12", or whatever you like). Drill the holes with a 1" auger bit.

    You then need two 8' long treated 2x8s. Drill a 1" hole in each, approximately 4" from the end of each board, and just below the center.

    Next comes some decking boards. I've shown 5/4 treated boards, but they may get awfully slick, so cedar or cypress might end up working better. Just make sure they're thick enough to support you on your bike. I'd think 5/4" would be fine if the whole assembly is 2' wide.

    I'd suggest a #8 rebar for the piece running through the whole assembly. Pull it out and adjust the height to suit you.

    You might need to use a shovel and just a bit of dirt to create a transition onto the ramp.

    I could also imagine a slightly fancier setup involving four posts and a couple of good barn door style hinges. You could then create a flat area to launch off of after climbing the ramp.
    I would suggest you check the re-bar frequently were it makes contact with the pressure treated wood. The new generation on PT wood uses a copper solution to treat it. The downside is the copper tends to corrode steel very quickly. So I might be a good idea to paint the rebar and grease the holes in the wood where the re-bar makes contact.

    I made some ladder drops / jumps in the backyard last month. I made the platforms similar to the one shown in the diagram above. But I am using some concrete blocks I had laying around to adjust the height. The blocks not only make it easy to adjust the height, but I can move the entire setup every couple of weeks so I don't wear at path in my back yard grass.

  8. #8
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    I think the easiest (and cheapest) way to do it is just to go to a beach and get a bunch of drift wood logs. Than you can cut ladder bridge slats from the smaller ones with a chainsaw, or a regular saw, and use too strong ones that are around the same lenght for the actual bridge. When I and my friends build, we use around one foot for slat wideness. (its important that you use close to the same lenght on the slats, unless you are going for some other affect.) But if you're just starting out, i recommend using something a little wider. A foot and a half shuld be good. Try to have all the slats the same thickness, and around two inches apart when you nail them on. Other than that, all you really need is something to prop it up. We sometimes just pile wood. Or you can easily nail together struts on one end. If you need to make it bigger, just add a few flattish logs to the bottom.
    Happy Trails
    Do, or do not. There is no try. Yoda

  9. #9
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    So is that a drop or a jump?

  10. #10
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    Double post

  11. #11
    Seeeriously easy Livin
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    looks like a jump to me, but if you take it slow enough it could count as a drop

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