Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 36
  1. #1
    Blanco
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,291

    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Bionicon Edison: a long review

    The Bionicon Edison

    (Note: this is a long review. Skip to the end if you want the summary.)

    All my mountain bikes are currently broken, so I was all set to rent one for the Downieville gathering. As it turned out, Bionicon had a huge van and trailer full of demo bikes at the campground, and Paul, their US rep, generously set me up with a large Edison for the weekend.



    The first thing I noticed is that all the suspension bits are unique to Bionicon. The Edison sports a 150mm dual-crown "Double Agent" air fork on the front with beefy 35mm stanchions, and a custom-valved X-Fusion air shock on the 140mm single-pivot rear. Then there are the air lines connecting the two (mostly routed internally, through the frame tubes), plus the magic orange "Bionicon" button on the handlebars.

    Here's the functional explanation: push the button and push down on the fork. The front end drops and the rear end rises. Push the button and sit back on the seat, and the front end rises and the rear and drops. The theory is that you usually want slack angles for descending and steep angles for grinding uphill, and instead of compromising with one or the other, you can change on the fly. For the official explanation with technical details, you can go here:
    http://www.bionicon.com/standard.xml?vpID=425

    Anyway, my first impression is of a slightly ungainly but burly bicycle. It's not ugly -- the white rims are classy and the logo is pleasingly understated -- but the profusion of air lines, bolts (for the adjustable stem), triple clamps, and other paraphernalia around the head tube and handlebars give the cockpit a cluttered appearance, and the lines of the frame, while certainly not off-putting, aren't terribly elegant. However, I certainly appreciated the standover of the strongly curved and dropped top tube, and the nicely-machined triple clamps let you know that someone spent some time and money on the design. Definitely a case of function over form.

    Then I lifted it. Was the frame filled with helium? I really expected something with a fork that size to weigh a lot more. I guessed it at about 31-32 pounds, and that's with regular X-7 drivetrain, low-end Firex cranks, and some big Schwalbe tires that looked quite capable of handling Downieville rocks.

    Sitting on the Edison revealed a very short top tube, and a clever set of bar reach and height adjustments that give you the equivalent of anywhere from a 25mm to 105mm stem plus some height adjustment. (The "stem" is actually two integrated clamps, like a motorcycle.) I have long arms, so the bars felt most natural all the way forward. Paul threw on my spare flat pedals and I was ready to ride.

    Fast forward: I rode the crap out of it with three shuttle runs, covering Sunrise, Pauley Creek, Butcher Ranch, Third, Second, and First Divides. I've been to Downieville several times and ridden the trails on several different bikes, so I think I have a solid basis for comparison.

    I am neither a great nor a terrible rider -- so if you are an amateur racer or new to mountain biking, your results may vary.

    Pedaling

    The Edison pedals well for a 6" bike (actually 140mm) despite the lack of a platform shock. The rear end bobs a tiny bit, but I couldn't tell without looking down, and it didn't suck any energy. There wasn't enough pedal feedback to bother me, and unlike a high-pivot like a Heckler, the rear end was still active when cranking over bumpy sections or technical uphills. Overall I think the pivot location is a good compromise: higher and less mushy than a Ventana or Kona, lower and softer than a Heckler or Bullit.

    Even fully slacked out, the geometry isn't so extreme that you can't climb, and I did't feel like I was falling off the back of the bike like I am on many freeride sleds. But why work hard when I have the magic button? Suddenly, instead of hanging onto a slacked-out freeride bike, I was poised right over the cranks and spinning like a roadie.

    I found the button to be much more useful than any of the lockouts or travel adjustments I've used, for several reasons. First, one button, easily accessible from the handlebars, took care of everything, instead of having to remember separate levers for fork and shock. Second, when I was properly positioned over the cranks, my pedal stroke was smooth and I didn't need a lockout. Third, unlike a fork with a lockout or travel adjust, the bottom bracket didn't drop and I still had suspension, so technical obstacles weren't a problem. Last, unlike a lockout, it's impossible to forget that you're in climbing mode and start bombing your descent with a locked fork or shock.

    Cranking out of the saddle will make the Edison bob, but no more so than any other big bike I've ridden.

    The bottom bracket is lower than a typical freeride bike (13.5" claimed), which makes for more stable descending, but also more pedal strikes. I would personally use a bash ring instead of the big chainring, and I don't think naked Eggbeaters are the hot tip.

    I can't say the magic button makes climbing fun, but it certainly makes it less painful and tiring. Where normally you would bring a shorter-travel bike, sacrificing downhill performance for climbing performance, you will find yourself much more willing to take the Edison on epic rides. This is where the Edison wins big over its competition: you can take it places that you wouldn't previously consider taking a big bike.

    Steering

    A 150mm dual-crown fork has no right to feel so light or steer so quickly. I could slice and dice any line I wanted at any speed, and I had no problem with switchbacks or tight turns. Unlike most DC forks, the offset is all in the triple clamp, so you can turn the bars just about 90 degrees, and the stanchions are far enough forward that I didn't hit my knees once all weekend despite the short top tube.

    I'm not sure whether the quickness is due to the light weight, the huge fork rake (53mm), or both. Either way, you can lean it like a roadie, or shove it down under you moto style. It's happy to do both.

    Descending

    Now that you've pedaled to the top, just push the magic button. It feels like the bike is melting under you, and suddenly you have nice slack descending geometry (66 HTA, 70 STA). My first serious descent was the loose babyheads of Pauley Creek, and I was pleasantly surprised by the plushness and stiffness of the fork and frame. The bike produced no drama at any speed, and if I were more fearless I'm sure I could have pushed it a lot harder.

    There is one obvious difference between the Edison and a freeride sled with the same travel: weight. The momentum of a heavier bike causes it to completely float over the babyheads. The Edison is light enough that it bounces a little more, and I'm pretty sure that the fork isn't as plush over high-speed trail chatter as the best open-bath coil forks. This didn't slow me down, though, and extra pounds are a bad tradeoff everywhere else.

    The Edison absolutely ripped through lower Butcher and Third Divide. It felt stable in corners: I could get plenty of weight on the front wheel, and never felt like the front end wanted to push or tuck, even on steep downhill switchbacks. The damping was perfect for bombing through rock and root gardens, and I never felt the fork pack up or rebound too quickly. The only place it could use improvement was on small high-speed trail chatter, like bumpy fire roads.

    As far as riding position, it has a short top tube, so imagine a Bullit, but without the sky-high bottom bracket and ridiculous pedal feedback.

    As I took more runs and got more confidence, I was able to push the bike harder through the rocky sections of Butcher and Third, and I started to really get my flow on. You can ride the Edison in two ways: steamroller over everything in your path like a big freeride sled and let the suspension do all the work, or duck and weave like a quick XC bike. I tended toward cut-and-thrust just because I could, but the suspension saved me when I missed my line and hit rocks head-on.

    I didn't notice until the end of the day that the Bionicon fork used a regular QR hub. It felt as stiff as any 20mm thru axle fork I've used, and I never got it to twist or go off my line. Apparently there are no adjustments beyond air pressure (+ and - air are self-balancing, as is damping) but I never felt like I wanted to adjust anything, since it worked well as is.

    I didn't really think about the rear shock. It did its job very well, without ever calling attention to itself, and the lack of platform damping produced a very smooth ride. It's easy to forget how plush suspension can be without artificial stiction ("SPV", "ProPedal") to rough it up. Same with the wheels, tires, handlebars, and X-7 drivetrain: they worked well and I never noticed them. The Formula brakes are a one-finger affair with good modulation, and I noticed no fade or boiling during three 15-mile downhill runs -- some of them heavily rushed to beat the clock and make the next shuttle run.

    Service

    With any relatively unknown brand, service is always going to be a concern. Get this: I returned the demo bike, but forgot to get my credit card back. Paul *personally delivered it to my house* three days later when he visited dealers in the Bay Area...and I don't even own one of his bikes! I doubt service is going to be a problem.

    Since I don't own one, I can't say how difficult regular maintenance is or how often the Edison will need it.

    Summary

    I'm always sceptical of "New Suspension Technology!", which is usually some combination of needless complication, meaningless marketing blather, and denial of the fact that motorcycle guys already figured everything out 20 years ago -- but Bionicon actually delivers on their promise.

    The Edison would be an excellent all-mountain ride even without the magic button. It's a well-balanced bicycle: no single characteristic defines it. It has no annoying quirks, no parts that need to be upgraded or apologized for, and there's nothing you have to get used to in order to ride it. Unlike most bikes, which are basically a collection of parts from many different manufacturers -- some of which work better than others -- the Edison has the feel of a vehicle that was designed and built as a whole by actual engineers who understood what they were doing and how to do it.

    Then you get the bonus of light weight, quick steering, and adjustable geometry. The light weight and quick steering make it easier to ride downhill than comparable 6" travel bikes, and the adjustable geometry makes it substantially less tiring to ride uphill. This means that you can ride the Edison a lot of places you'd normally be unable to take such a big bike. This is what really makes the Edison exceptional.

    In summary: the Bionicon Edison is one of those rare new bicycles that doesn't just force you into a different set of tradeoffs -- it actually expands the possibilities of what you can do on a mountain bike.

    Up and Down

    Up:
    Well-balanced frame with well-tuned suspension
    Geometry adjust really works, and is easier to use than explain
    Climbs like an XC bike, descends like a freeride sled
    Light weight and quick steering for a 6" travel bike
    Clever adjustable stem

    Down:
    Should come with a bash ring
    Fork could be better with small high-speed chatter
    Not bad looking, but not sexy either
    No 29er version for us tall folk
    I don't own one

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    771
    Wow... you really nailed it on your review. Having had one for three years next month, I have to agree with everything you've said. I've taken mine on 400+ mile epics (across the rockies) and technical, exposed trails in Utah, lots of epic climbs, and rock garden descents, and it's always delivered.

    You were concerned about service, and I can understand that. I was nervous about it too, but went ahead and took the plunge and bought the first one in the U.S. before they were even officially available here. I haven't had any issues with the frame, fork or shock at all. I've just done routine service of the fork, and replaced the rear shock bushing once a year, and I replaced the drive train (derailleur, cluster, chain and chainrings) after 2 1/2 years of abuse.

    The fork wipers need lubing about once a week, and takes about the same effort as lubing a chain. The routine "complete" fork service takes about ten minutes and is ridiculously simple. I do it about every 2 or three months. It takes standard tools (a 5mm allen key to remove the brake, and a wrench) and some fork lube. There's no bath or damping oil to worry about, as the shock cartridge is a sealed system inside one of the fork legs. You just take off the brake, undo one screw at the bottom of one leg, slide off the lowers, wipe out the old grease, put in some new grease, and slide the lowers back on and re-attach the brake.

    I've never touched the rear shock or the swingarm pivot. The headset is also their own design with the bearing races machined on to the clamps, and I've not touched mine since the first week I owned it. Service hasn't been an issue for me at all...

    There are pics in my profile of my Edison, but I'm soon stepping up to a Supershuttle, the new 7" Bionicon. I'm told they're in their first production run right now, and I have no problems dropping in on the new design. The company has proven their reliability to me already.

    Thanks for sharing, and being so thorough.
    Last edited by Kanga; 06-13-2007 at 07:02 PM.
    http://www.bioniconusa.com - Bionicon USA
    http://otbmbc.com - Over the Bars MTB Club
    http://corbamtb.com - CORBA

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hikerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    707
    I've been riding the similar Bionicon Golden Willow for a couple of months now and really enjoy the bike. What I really like about the bike is that I can easily lift the front end even going down a fairly steep downhill -- this is very confidence-inspiring over those ledge drops and rock ramps that we have here on South Mountain in Phoenix. The fork works very well -- it makes my old Push'ed Fox Talas 130 RLC seem like something that belongs on a child's toy.

    The magic button is pretty useful -- when climbing a steep hill shifting the geometry forward lets me actually sit on the seat instead of using it as a prod. On cross country trails I usually just set the front fork down about and inch and a half into it's travel but sometimes can't resist messing with the magic button over short uphills and downhills -- just because I can.

    The suspension is so good I'm now taking the fun line instead of the safe line. I'm pretty sure now that after I roll over a ledge both wheels will hit the ground at the same time and the bike will suck up the landing just like it's supposed to.

    The bike is also great for the ride to and from the trail on the road, too.

    The Edison is probably better for that crazy downhill stuff, but I like the look of the Golden Willow better and don't ride really technical terrain -- yet. I think that the Horst link probably makes the bike a bit more compliant over bumps but can't tell because I haven't ridden an Edison. (Anyone want to swap bikes for a few days?)

    I've also spoiled a new rider by putting him on the Golden Willow for a few rides. (I put the new rider on the Bionicon instead of the Tank (my old Trek Liquid 30) because the Bionicon is very forgiving, easy to ride, and has good standover clearance.

  4. #4
    Warrior's Society
    Reputation: mtnbikej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    4,760
    Great review......Bionicon's are definatley bikes you have to ride to understand. We have a few demo's at our shop and they are a blast to ride.


    mtnbikej

  5. #5
    Just roll it......
    Reputation: ebxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,463

    Great review.

    El Caballo,

    Excellent breakdown and you did a good job of comparing it to bikes we've all ridden (bullit, kona, ventana, etc.). Seeing how you have ridden the D-ville trails prior, that's a great opportunity to try a new rig and see how it performs. Thanks for the info.

    Cheers,
    EB

  6. #6
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
    Reputation: crisillo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    20,759
    awesome review, Caballo!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,113
    Well done!

    Only quibble would be with the description of SPV or ProPedal as "artificial stiction." I'm not the hugest fan of the platforms, but I think that assessment is a bit off the mark.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tkul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    609


    As anyone tryed the SUPERSHUTTLE?

    Prices?
    Living in Portugal, would it be possible to try one?

  9. #9
    Purveyor of Trail Tales!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,071

    Good job! Killer Review!

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  10. #10
    Warrior's Society
    Reputation: mtnbikej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    4,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Tkul


    As anyone tryed the SUPERSHUTTLE?

    Prices?
    Living in Portugal, would it be possible to try one?

    Test rode the Supershuttle.....frame was a medium.....needed a large. Took it on a XC ride. Could definately see the potential that it has. Waiting to demo a production version when they come available.

  11. #11
    Bionicon Rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    216

    Thanks

    Great review El Caballo!!

    Glad you liked the Edison and that I could help you have a fun weekend. I really had a blast hanging out with everyone at Packsaddle and riding the great trails in Downieville.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Schweiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    55
    Excellent review!

    Does anyone know the current prices on the Edison & Golden Willow 0/I/II ??

  13. #13
    Paste eater
    Reputation: Jwind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,410
    I was already to get tits deap in your review until I came to the part of which you said "I noticed is that all the suspension bits are unique to Bionicon". Sorry folks , proprietary and suspension just don't belong together (yet?). Ya, connondale, specy, scott and prolly some more got some things goin on but I want OPTIONS.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    771
    Quote Originally Posted by Jwind
    I was already to get tits deap in your review until I came to the part of which you said "I noticed is that all the suspension bits are unique to Bionicon". Sorry folks , proprietary and suspension just don't belong together (yet?). Ya, connondale, specy, scott and prolly some more got some things goin on but I want OPTIONS.
    Hey Jwind,

    The proprietary part only applies to the front shock and the slave cylinder that allows for the adjustable geometry. The rear shock is an X-fusion, and there are rumors that other manufacturers may be releasing Bionicon compatible rear shocks. The slave cylinder is actually just threaded on to the piston of a standard x-fusion shock, so there's no reason any willing company couldn't make a piston with that thread mount.

    The "proprietary" front shock guts are an easily replaceable sealed cartridge that threads into one of the stanchions. The clamps stanchions, seals, and lowers are all easily replaced as well. Mine has over 4000 miles on it in three years, and I've never had to do anything but normal lubrication of the front shock bushings and seals, which requires no special tools, and takes about ten minutes. Proprietary, in this case, doesn't mean complicated or unserviceable. In fact, it's a return to simplicity in many ways.

    People on these boards seem to think Bionicon is a new company, but they've been developing this system for about ten years and have several thousand of their bikes being ridden in Europe, and I understand they're the fastest growing brand in Europe.

    I can understand your hesitation though.... until newer technologies are widely adopted, there will always be some risk. I took that risk three years ago and have no regrets.... Caballo's review echoes my own feelings about the Edison very closely (except for his last "down" point...since I do own one!).
    http://www.bioniconusa.com - Bionicon USA
    http://otbmbc.com - Over the Bars MTB Club
    http://corbamtb.com - CORBA

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    771
    Quote Originally Posted by Schweiz
    Excellent review!

    Does anyone know the current prices on the Edison & Golden Willow 0/I/II ??
    I'm not sure the exact prices, but I remember the II (Sram X7, etc) being around $2800 and prices going up from there with the better component builds.

    I paid around $3000 for my Edison I, but that was three years ago when the US dollar was worth a bit more, and the bikes weren't being distributed in the U.S then.
    http://www.bioniconusa.com - Bionicon USA
    http://otbmbc.com - Over the Bars MTB Club
    http://corbamtb.com - CORBA

  16. #16
    Bionicon Rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    216
    Quote Originally Posted by Jwind
    I was already to get tits deap in your review until I came to the part of which you said "I noticed is that all the suspension bits are unique to Bionicon". Sorry folks , proprietary and suspension just don't belong together (yet?). Ya, connondale, specy, scott and prolly some more got some things goin on but I want OPTIONS.
    You can look at proprietary suspension in a couple ways and both are valid points.

    Your view, OPTIONS, is one point.

    The other is that all proprietary suspension is designed to work perfectly between the fork, Shock and Frame, and in the case of Bionicon the Frame is 100% designed around the Bionicon suspension system for optimized performance.

    Think of it this way, you wouldn't put Audi front suspension and Mercedes rear suspension on a BMW because none of the componants would work together the way they are designed to function. And we have all seen this on many peoples custom built MTB's and a few OEM bikes as well, sometimes it simply doesn't work out the way it was planned or supposed to function.

    There is a reason and a place for Proprietary in the Bike world as there is in many other types of vehicles.

  17. #17
    "El Whatever"
    Reputation: Warp's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    18,664
    Quote Originally Posted by fergyrock
    Think of it this way, you wouldn't put Audi front suspension and Mercedes rear suspension on a BMW because none of the componants would work together the way they are designed to function. And we have all seen this on many peoples custom built MTB's and a few OEM bikes as well, sometimes it simply doesn't work out the way it was planned or supposed to function.
    But you can have adjustable Koni's or better and tune it the way you like. Many people out there also know their stuff and can get the best out of their equipment with a third party part.

    Options are a good thing.
    Check my Site

  18. #18
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
    Reputation: crisillo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    20,759
    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    But you can have adjustable Koni's or better and tune it the way you like. Many people out there also know their stuff and can get the best out of their equipment with a third party part.

    Options are a good thing.
    I agree that options are good and everything... but the suspension is the "core" of bionicon.. that is their whole reason for their bikes.. they way their shocks and fork work together... I am pretty sure there can be some tuning to be done.. but the integration is critical for the purpose of the bike...

    besides.. they did come up with the first adjustable travel fork patent .. they know their stuff

  19. #19
    "El Whatever"
    Reputation: Warp's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    18,664
    Quote Originally Posted by crisillo
    I agree that options are good and everything... but the suspension is the "core" of bionicon.. that is their whole reason for their bikes.. they way their shocks and fork work together... I am pretty sure there can be some tuning to be done.. but the integration is critical for the purpose of the bike...
    Well... It could have been said like that before...

    Makes perfect sense in that context.
    Check my Site

  20. #20
    Blanco
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,291
    Yes. The adjustable riding attitude is the whole reason that Bionicon built their bikes in the first place. You can't do that unless you integrate the front and rear suspension.

    Too often, stock bikes come with whatever parts the purchasing department could get cheaply, and there are inferior or inappropriate parts that need upgrading right out of the box. Even if parts were chosen purely for performance, they're usually not optimized for that specific frame. A nice side effect of the Bionicon system is that since there is only one option for front and rear suspension, the front and rear have obviously been tested and tuned to work together. Note that the cheapest Edison comes with the same fork and shock as the most expensive.

    Options are only a good thing if they're good options. I don't need the option to make something worse. Based on my test ride, there's not a lot you can do to an Edison that isn't purely a matter of taste (like a floating brake). If you want/need to go bigger than the Edison fork permits, you really should own an Ironwood instead.

  21. #21
    Are you gonna eat that?
    Reputation: Kyoseki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    502
    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    But you can have adjustable Koni's or better and tune it the way you like. Many people out there also know their stuff and can get the best out of their equipment with a third party part.

    Options are a good thing.
    You're not a Mac user, are you?
    Due to a lack of interest, tomorrow has been canceled

  22. #22
    Bionicon Rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    216
    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    But you can have adjustable Koni's or better and tune it the way you like. Many people out there also know their stuff and can get the best out of their equipment with a third party part.

    Options are a good thing.
    Without a doubt options are a good thing, when done right it allows for a lot of the best bikes that are out there.

    My thought was not to discredit using options it was just a way to explain the benefits of using proprietary suspension whether Cdale, Specy Scott or Bioncon. I guess I should have worded myself better.

  23. #23
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation: Boyonadyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,809
    Quote Originally Posted by fergyrock
    You can look at proprietary suspension in a couple ways and both are valid points.

    Your view, OPTIONS, is one point.

    The other is that all proprietary suspension is designed to work perfectly between the fork, Shock and Frame, and in the case of Bionicon the Frame is 100% designed around the Bionicon suspension system for optimized performance.

    Think of it this way, you wouldn't put Audi front suspension and Mercedes rear suspension on a BMW because none of the componants would work together the way they are designed to function. And we have all seen this on many peoples custom built MTB's and a few OEM bikes as well, sometimes it simply doesn't work out the way it was planned or supposed to function.

    There is a reason and a place for Proprietary in the Bike world as there is in many other types of vehicles.

    I can clearly see your line of reasoning on this, having owned many a german diesel sedan, from jetta's to Audi5000TD's, to currently a Passat TDI and a Jetta TDI.

    Honestly, I don't understand why Americans just feel the need to have to tinker with great integrated German engineering. Germans usually build a package that is engineered to work all the various systems together seamlessly.

    I demo'd an Edison Labor Day weekend up at Mammoth Mountain, and granted, as a newbie, I don't have much experience in newer technology double suspension bikes. I can say that the bike felt unbelievably light with those forks, especially pulling it out of a shelled 4x4 Ford pickup truck with 4" of lift. I can also say the bike, with 6" of fork travel, in my opinion, liked it better being pushed hard. The harder you push it over the terrain. the better it rode and the more predictable the suspension behaved. I picked my lines, the bike delivered flawlessly. I could have gone rockbashing too, I suppose, but it was more fun to me to dissect the trail and pick the clean lines.
    This, the Edison does well. I believe the germans designed this bike to be ridden like their cars are to be driven, fast, and on autobahns, canyons, mtn roads, with extreme performance in mind from a production vehicle.

    If I buy one, I understand how the German mindset is on routine maintenance. Do it, when it needs it, not when you feel like it, or "get around to it".

    Myself, I'll worry about the integration package when and if it fails, which I believe is only likely if you grossly abuse your equipment.
    Last edited by Boyonadyke; 09-12-2007 at 07:52 PM.

  24. #24
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation: Boyonadyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,809
    Quote Originally Posted by Kanga
    I'm not sure the exact prices, but I remember the II (Sram X7, etc) being around $2800 and prices going up from there with the better component builds.

    I paid around $3000 for my Edison I, but that was three years ago when the US dollar was worth a bit more, and the bikes weren't being distributed in the U.S then.
    I believe the current price in US $ is $2780 for a Bionicon Edison Ltd II. I feel with what you are getting component wise, and performance wise, it's an outstanding value in todays mountain bike / All Mountain category. I don't buy something for someone else's appreciation or bling factor, I buy it for what it does for me. The Edison delivers the goods /performance for my style of riding.

    I've seen some of the pics of Kanga hucking it, 3 years worth, and he's not broken a thing yet on his Edison. I'll ride my bike, and we'll see if this bubba grenades a frame. I have my doubts, though, the design of the frame is such that the load is spread over such a large structural area, that the swing arm bending or the rim getting D'd is my biggest worry, or bottoming out a rear shock and blowing a seal. Ride the bike within it's design, and it won't be an issue.

    For me, it was a no brainer. I demo'd it, loved it, ordered it, picked it up, rode it. I put my money on the line, where my mouth is. I have no doubt or hesitation that I got pretty much two functional bikes for the price of one. Who know's maybe someday I'll upgrade to a Super Shuttle. Right now, I'm riding their bread and butter flagship bike, and I'm loving it. After riding it and then seeing the price tag, I thought the bike was a great value for the price, when comparing it to other big name brands.

    Demo one, see for yourself, only then will you know if it's for you. Bring a credit card, you might need it after the demo.

    One other thing...

    Quote

    The bottom bracket is lower than a typical freeride bike (13.5" claimed), which makes for more stable descending, but also more pedal strikes. I would personally use a bash ring instead of the big chainring, and I don't think naked Eggbeaters are the hot tip.


    This lower crank height, I feel, plays an advantage, for me. I am able, due to the lower crank height, to feel quite comfortable, all 6'5" of me with a 36" inseam, on a Large Frame, instead of an extra large. It lowers my center of gravity on the bike, makes me feel more like I'm part of the bike instead of on top of the bike. The cockpit arrangement feel very comfortable to me. Of course, it's a trade off with bashing rocks, but if you are gonna bash rocks with pedals, you are gonna bash your deraillieur and hanger too, best to choose a cleaner line.
    Last edited by Boyonadyke; 09-13-2007 at 09:18 AM.
    "i'll brazilian when YOU do boy, right around the ol' rusty star. Actually, whole fruit bowl. Get on it!" NicoleB

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    356
    Great thread here. I am trying to convince myself that I don't need a new bike!! But it ain't working. The more I hear about the Bionicon bikes the more I see myself needing one.

    I have a Kona Stinky 2000 and maybe it's time to check out some new technology.

    By the way, does any Bio. owner feel the need to lower there seatpost on long descents?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •