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  1. #1
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    In between sizes - L and XL - tough call - help please!

    I'm 6'2, 170 lbs and seem to be right in between L and XL. I test rode both today - Giant Talon 3 (2017) 27.5"... and went with what the salesman encouraged - the XL. I was kind of wondering though if he was trying to unload a bike at a size that sells less often. He was about my height and said all of his bikes are XL, so kind of persuaded me in that direction. I'm having second thoughts though. I felt like I had a tighter turning radius with the Large size, better control anyway. On the XL I liked the height of how I sat on it, but am noticing my arms/elbows seem to be somewhat locked out,on my reach. I'm wondering if they should be more bent, in order to safely control this bike. What is the rule of thumb on this? I haven't taken it on a full ride yet though, just the shop parking lot. My main use I expect will be mild trail riding (nothing too gnarley or intense as I just hit 40 yrs old and health/safety are pretty key right now ---and may be taking out my 7 yr old son on his bike), and will do plenty of road riding too - mostly leisure, fitness, not racing or tricks or anything.
    Any and all advice and suggestions are welcomed.

    thanks!
    Drew

    image attached is me on the XL - does this look about right? or am I too stretched out? In between sizes - L and XL - tough call - help please!-talon-3-xl.jpg

  2. #2
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    I'm not an expert fitter by any means but heres my 2 cents.

    I'm between M and L and veer toward the smaller size. Its easier to make a small bike fit larger with a taller seat post and longer stem. You can't really make a big bike fit smaller. There are certainly limitations though especially with slack seat tube angles!

    Looking at the photo you are probably on the right size. You're sitting very upright so the reach isn't to far by any means. With your elbows bent slightly you'll be in a good riding position. You're saddle height seems a little low judging by the knee bend but the saddle looks slightly below handlebar height which would be fine for your type of riding. A large frame would likely have the saddle level with or higher than the handlebars which would be better for XC racing.

    It might be a good idea to contact Giant and ask what they think.

  3. #3
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    thank you for your reply, this is definitely helpful...

  4. #4
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    Right. Tough call to make, even with the picture. I think long term you'll be better off with the XL though, because honestly, I work exactly the opposite of Dave - if someone is on the line between sizes, I'd size up every time. You're better off moving the saddle forward on the rails a little and putting a slightly shorter stem on if you need it than you are to take the smaller size and put the saddle all the way back or put a super long stem on. Bringing the saddle forward will get you over the pedals more if that's a problem for you, and get you closer to the bars. I will agree with Dave about your saddle height in the picture though - it probably only needs to come up 1/4" but it should come up some.

  5. #5
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    Your bike comes with a 110mm stem (ridiculously long) just like my 2017 Fathom did and that was the very first thing I swapped. A 110mm stem gives a weird sweeping feel to the steering. I also felt like I was leaning too far forward. I initially swapped to an 80mm stem but eventually swapped to 787mm bars and 50mm stem. Stems are cheap and your Giant dealer can order you one and even install it for you for about $30.

    Your bars are pretty narrow so I personally would suggest a 80mm stem, 70mm at a minimum. Your steering will start to feel too fast and twitchy around or below 70mm. If you want to go to a stem below 70mm, then I'd suggest wider bars.

  6. #6
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    That pic doesn't really depict a realistic riding position. I'd imagine you will not be that upright when actually pedaling... or at least that isn't the intent of that geo/design. Looks like it'll fit fine with perhaps a stem swap if it still feels too long.

    .01

  7. #7
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    That XL doesn't look stretched out to me. You could lean forward more. You can tweak the fit of either bike eg. with a shorter stem as suggested above since they are both within range so I wouldn't stress over it, just go with one and ride!

  8. #8
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    thanks to all for your replies....these are very helpful.....great insights. I rode the XL on the street a little more today, adjusted my own riding position (leaning forward, bending elbows a bit) and it feels much better. Hopefully will have the same feel on a trail. I checked out the stem and you're right..I can see how getting a shorter one will make a big difference if my upper traps/neck feel strained over time. Thanks again!

  9. #9
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    Unfortunately this picture isn't worth anything because you will not look anything like that when riding the bike.

    With that said, reaches are getting longer and longer and stems are getting shorter. A bike that is larger will also be more stable at speed and keeps you from feeling like you will go over the bars when descending. I think you made the right choice at 6'2". I am only 6' and sometimes an xl will feel better than a large, so bear in mind that sizing has some flex to it.

    Anyway, welcome to the sport! Hope you have the chance to take your bike out on some cool trail rides soon.

  10. #10
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    Have someone take a side view picture of you riding each size. You might look at the smaller bike and immediately realize it's too small for you. That's what I did between an xl that was on sale and the xxl that I needed.

  11. #11
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    I would say it looks like the right size for you, if you feel stretched out, as others have said, it most likely came stock with a 100mm or longer stem, so you can easily swap to a 50, 60 or 70mm, just ask the shop if they have an old one you can test. Going to a shorter stem will help a lot with your ability to steer and give you the proper elbow bend you need.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  12. #12
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    You could do a shorter stem, bars with 12 degree backsweep and a -1 angle set or combination of all three if you feel too stretched out. One or all three of those things should get the fit right.

  13. #13
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    You're not even remotely between sizes. Some XL's may be too small. I doubt anyone makes a large you actually fit.

    I'm 5'7 and can fit quite a few larges.

    From the pictures it looks like the seat is too far back on the rails, but the bike isn't too big by any means.

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