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  1. #1
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    Best SPD equivalent to Crank Bros Mallet.....?

    Iam looking for a nice wide pedal for All mountain riding, ...I have a DMR V12 at the moment and Iam looking to make the switch....but would like a pedal that is a bit of both, like the Crank Bros Mallet but in SPD....

    ....what do you recomend...??

    Iam currently looking at the Azonic A Frame clipless pedal

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=11829

    Thanks.....
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  2. #2
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    647. or time z
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  3. #3
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    Shimano doesn't make a non-adjustable SPD pedal that breaks as much as the crank brother's mallet, but they do make the 647, which is a damn good pedal. 545s are also good, a little more compact, but with a strong metal cage.
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  4. #4
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    What i was kind of looking for is SPD one side and flat the other....the 647's look the best, but iam assuming they arent like that, they are SPD both sides.....?

    So are those Time Z's SPD too? they look totally different, with just two bars going across...

    thanks...
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    What i was kind of looking for is SPD one side and flat the other....the 647's look the best, but iam assuming they arent like that, they are SPD both sides.....?

    So are those Time Z's SPD too? they look totally different, with just two bars going across...

    thanks...
    G4, if you're talking about something like the Shimano 323, if you've never ridden pedals like those, I think you'll be sorely disappointed. That flat-on-one-side/SPD-on-the-other design is horrible on a trail. The pedal always rotates to a position that is hard to acquire. These types of pedals work OK for commuter applications, but if you're trying to ride a trail where you're going to unclip to any degree, they are horrible. I have a set of those pedals. IMO and experience I think they are a bad choice.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    What i was kind of looking for is SPD one side and flat the other....the 647's look the best, but iam assuming they arent like that, they are SPD both sides.....?

    So are those Time Z's SPD too? they look totally different, with just two bars going across...

    thanks...
    You don't want flat on one side. The SPD mechanism is always heavier and that side of the pedal with naturally rotate until it's face-down. That makes clipping in very difficult (you have to "flip" the pedal first) and more dangerous in rough terrain. The SPD on one-side is a terrible idea, up there with toe-clips. Either do flats or do clipless.

    If you want the "flat" side for technical stuff, that kind of defeats the entire purpose of clipless pedals. This means that you are decreasing your control during the technical sections (by unclipping). It also usually means you don't have the speed to clear the obstacles and crashing is usually more likely. Some DHers use flats, but they go flats all the way with sticky shoes. For some big crazy jumps and ladder rides, it's nice to be able to ditch the bike, but plenty of other DHers use clipless due to the control (mentioned above).

    Yes, Time Zs are like the CB pedal, but much better. The shimano 647s and 545s are the closest comparable.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    G4, if you're talking about something like the Shimano 323, if you've never ridden pedals like those, I think you'll be sorely disappointed. That flat-on-one-side/SPD-on-the-other design is horrible on a trail. The pedal always rotates to a position that is hard to acquire. These types of pedals work OK for commuter applications, but if you're trying to ride a trail where you're going to unclip to any degree, they are horrible. I have a set of those pedals. IMO and experience I think they are a bad choice.
    Agreed, useless on the trials.

  8. #8
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    Yeah i have tried pedals like that they came on my Pitch or something very simular....they were a nightmare, always spinning to the wrong side.....crap!

    I thought maybe they would have weighted them properly to be equal on both sides, so not spinning away.....

    I have a pair of Shimano MP66 shoes coming tomorrow....
    They have a really good rating in UK mags, so i think im gonna go with the Time Z control pedals to go with them and just get into using clipless.....just hope the bearings are something like my DMR V12's cos they are buttery smooth.....

    Thanks for the advice everyone....
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    my road bike pedals are one sided and I think it would be awful off road.

    How about shimano m424, wide enough platform to ride unclipped and reasonable weight, they are billed as a budget pedal but they have top end performance.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nsynk
    my road bike pedals are one sided and I think it would be awful off road.

    How about shimano m424, wide enough platform to ride unclipped and reasonable weight, they are billed as a budget pedal but they have top end performance.
    Good shout...!!
    What is the difference between the Shimano 647 and the M424 then? both got the resin cages on them.....the cheaper M424 is lighter too.......?!
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    Iam looking for a nice wide pedal for All mountain riding, ...I have a DMR V12 at the moment and Iam looking to make the switch....but would like a pedal that is a bit of both, like the Crank Bros Mallet but in SPD....

    ....what do you recomend...??

    Iam currently looking at the Azonic A Frame clipless pedal

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=11829

    Thanks.....
    I've been in just this position before. I liked the feeling of SPDs but never found one with any kind of decent platform. The answer were the Time ATAC Z's. Seriously these are like the offspring of a SPD and the Mallets.

    The locking mechanism looks almost the same as the CB's but it feels a lot more like SPD to me. I really hated the 'mushiness' (read: too much float) of the CBs. The Times aren't like that at all.

    http://www.time-sport.com/product-sh...0.idp.134.html
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  12. #12
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    Atomlab Quickstep...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vulcan
    I've been in just this position before. I liked the feeling of SPDs but never found one with any kind of decent platform. The answer were the Time ATAC Z's. Seriously these are like the offspring of a SPD and the Mallets.

    The locking mechanism looks almost the same as the CB's but it feels a lot more like SPD to me. I really hated the 'mushiness' (read: too much float) of the CBs. The Times aren't like that at all.

    http://www.time-sport.com/product-sh...0.idp.134.html
    Yeah iam looking at these at the moment.......it is between the Shimano M424's and these Time Z Controls......the 'time' do look a lot better tho, and a lot easier too clean.....dont look like they will hold onto any mud at all.....
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayDial
    Atomlab Quickstep...
    These had a bad review over here in the UK, but i think that mainly because of the original asking price... £109.99 was a bit salty wasnt it.....down to £59.99 now.....you have these then...?
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    Yeah iam looking at these at the moment.......it is between the Shimano M424's and these Time Z Controls......the 'time' do look a lot better tho, and a lot easier too clean.....dont look like they will hold onto any mud at all.....
    They do significantly better with mud than SPDs do.
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  16. #16
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    Yep i have them. Picked them for around $80 from CRC back when the exchange rate was in our favor. I absolutely love them. The only difficult part was shoe selection. Must be a flat bottom spd skate style shoe. I went with the 661 Launch. Easy in / easy out.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vulcan
    They do significantly better with mud than SPDs do.
    I think my main concern is, is there any grip when you just put your foot/shoe on the pedal not clipped in.....because when the **** hits the fan, you do want to have a dab with the foot and stay out sometimes dont you.....perhaps its my novice riding abilities but i do have close ones regular because iam pushing it all the time.....

    the other would be bearings....my DMR's are awsum, smooth....hope i can find the same with a clipped'in pedal....
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayDial
    Yep i have them. Picked them for around $80 from CRC back when the exchange rate was in our favor. I absolutely love them. The only difficult part was shoe selection. Must be a flat bottom spd skate style shoe. I went with the 661 Launch. Easy in / easy out.
    Yeah i got the shimano MP66 coming 2mo....so perfect....
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    I think my main concern is, is there any grip when you just put your foot/shoe on the pedal not clipped in.....because when the **** hits the fan, you do want to have a dab with the foot and stay out sometimes dont you.....perhaps its my novice riding abilities but i do have close ones regular because iam pushing it all the time.....

    the other would be bearings....my DMR's are awsum, smooth....hope i can find the same with a clipped'in pedal....
    I'm convinced that it is impossible to make a pedal that works as well as I would like both clipped in and unclipped.

    If the pedal is too grippy then you will never be able to get properly clipped in or clipped out. You can counteract this by raising the interface but if this sits too high it compromises grip while unclipped.

    I think its a matter of striking a balance between the two. The Z's do a good job of that.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    Good shout...!!
    What is the difference between the Shimano 647 and the M424 then? both got the resin cages on them.....the cheaper M424 is lighter too.......?!
    The dif is in the pedal body itself. The 647 has an updated body which is better for muddy areas and has a much better feel overall than the older style 424. I've used the 424, 636 (old school DX pedal with red body; still have them actually), 520 & 647's and prefer the new style body. Also the cage on the 647 is much more robust, I actually broke the cage on my 424's, cracked it around the spindle, which is what lead me to the 647.

  21. #21
    TNC
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    G4, stay away from the Shimano 424/434 series. I have a drawer full of these in my shop...all with broken cages. Even when the cage doesn't break, the mechanism on the end of the spindle comes loose and the cage flops everywhere. Please stay with the 647. The two pedals look quite similar but they are not even in the same league.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    Iam looking for a nice wide pedal for All mountain riding, ...I have a DMR V12 at the moment and Iam looking to make the switch....but would like a pedal that is a bit of both, like the Crank Bros Mallet but in SPD....

    ....what do you recomend...??

    Iam currently looking at the Azonic A Frame clipless pedal

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=11829

    Thanks.....
    I've got the Shimano 647s which have a nice platform (helps when you don't get clipped in right away), are extremely easy to clip into (& out of), and are known as very reliable. I picked up a pair for around $85.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    Yeah iam looking at these at the moment.......it is between the Shimano M424's and these Time Z Controls......the 'time' do look a lot better tho, and a lot easier too clean.....dont look like they will hold onto any mud at all.....
    Me and my girlfriend both use the 647's and really like them. And we beat them up bad in our AZ rocks on our Motolites.

    I would go the 647's over the 424's for durability. Big difference between the two. The 647 is one of the easiest pedals ever to get into. And it has excellent release.

    One nice thing with the 647 is the ability to really tune how it releases. Not only can you adjust the tension, but you have the option of running the Multi-release cleat like we do. I like this cleat adjusted with a little more tension than the standard cleat. I can dab almost as easy as a platform, but get great climbing power, and my feet stay on when downhilling. If you are a big hucker and whip the bike, it may release too easy, so use the standard cleat.

    No other pedal gives you so much tuning ability to get the feel you like.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayDial
    Yep i have them. Picked them for around $80 from CRC back when the exchange rate was in our favor. I absolutely love them. The only difficult part was shoe selection. Must be a flat bottom spd skate style shoe. I went with the 661 Launch. Easy in / easy out.
    Caught in a pinch with the wrong shoes or for casual rides, the Quiksteps really do work manageably well with plain old (no cleat) skate shoes in the sense that the cleat retention wings mash down fairly flat when you're not clipped in. So you can actually contact the cage for traction. You do have to maintain some downward pressure on them in bumpy conditions, but you get less of that protruding lump feeling underneath that you might get with say a shimano caged pedal. If you had shoes with cleats on, you might defeat the notion of riding clipped out just in sketchy situations. It uses a big cleat compared to spd, and the cleat interface has a lot of surface area. I'm not sure that you could keep from clipping back in accidentally under those circumstances. I don't recall trying. Instead, I was more curious about whether they would work with clipless AND flat shoes so I could just hop on the bike no matter which I had on.

    They have their advantages, but as mentioned you really need a skate style SPD shoe like the 661 Launch. Particularly one with a VERY shallow recessed area for the cleat so it can sit almost outside out of the soles. I had trouble getting clipped in reliably with the deep cleat trench in my normal SPD shoes.

  25. #25
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    I have been running the Shimano PD-M545 pedals on my AM/DH rig for a full season now and heading into another season with them. So far I love these pedals for aggresive riding, they have a nice platform and strong metal cage. I run M-520s on my hardtail and CB eggbeaters on my hybrid. So far I love all of these pedals!

    The M545
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  26. #26
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    The 647 or M545

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vulcan
    I'm convinced that it is impossible to make a pedal that works as well as I would like both clipped in and unclipped.

    If the pedal is too grippy then you will never be able to get properly clipped in or clipped out. You can counteract this by raising the interface but if this sits too high it compromises grip while unclipped.

    I think its a matter of striking a balance between the two. The Z's do a good job of that.
    Do the Time Z control have multi release cleats....? could be a deciding factor....so many votes for the 647's on here........

    ...also had my MP66 shoes today, look like they will soak a fair bit of water but apart from that look very good....will have to try them....
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4VNJ
    Do the Time Z control have multi release cleats....?

    No. You must move your heel outward. That said, once the cleats get brocken in, it is very easy and predictable.

  29. #29
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    I have read in another thread that the M454 (assuming it is the same with the 647's 454's etc) retracts, and can then be used as a platform...?

    What does this mean....?.......the cleat can be set deep in the pedal....?
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    the M545s are a decent pedal

    But if you deal with alot of mud go Time. They clear mud. Shimano's have too many small parts that get all gunked up.

    If you are already running SPD then the 545 is your best choice

  31. #31
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    Z's. I've been running mine for 3 or 4 years with no maintenance, still smooth and working fine.

  32. #32
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    don't plan on using the Zs unclipped if the pedal or your foot will be getting wet.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    You don't want flat on one side. The SPD mechanism is always heavier and that side of the pedal with naturally rotate until it's face-down. That makes clipping in very difficult (you have to "flip" the pedal first) and more dangerous in rough terrain. The SPD on one-side is a terrible idea, up there with toe-clips. Either do flats or do clipless.
    Just a matter of getting used to. Actually the bigger problem is finding a good pair of shoes that will accomodate both the clipless and platform side equally well. Most spd specific shoes are too narrow when on the platform side and cannot utilize fully the studs/pins for the best grip

    Have posted about this pedal before...
    Wellgo Wam D10



    I have tried all the Shimanos...nothing comes close if you are looking at "fully clipped" and a "true platform feel" without changing pedal. Plus the mud shedding is much better than Shims.

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    if you have clipless pedals, why would you want a platform at all? the more rocky, nasty a trail is, the more of a benefit you get from clipless pedals.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomsmoto
    if you have clipless pedals, why would you want a platform at all? the more rocky, nasty a trail is, the more of a benefit you get from clipless pedals.
    tom, aren't we talking about a clipless/platform combo pedal? Some riders want a pedal that has both elements for some of the reasons already mentioned in this post.

  36. #36
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    I have decided to go with the Time Z Control pedals, ordered them last night, should be here tomorrow.....

    Thank you to everyone for your input, it was valued a lot !!

    Now just got to get used to Mtb'in clipped in....?????!!!!
    If i had to guess how it will go, i will crash a lot and because of that, i will have to smooth out my riding a lot in order to stay on. Where as now, where im just pushing it all the time and coming off or very near to it regular.......
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    when they arrive

    the cleats have instructions. you can mount them 2 ways. 1 has a much lower release angle.
    There is a star on one of the cleats. Star on left foot = 1 thing, Star on right = the other

    clicking out is easy, kick the heel out. think Wizard of Oz "I wanna go home"

    don't try at the top of the pedal stroke, hardest place

    most common fall to newbs is actually on climbs. You'll want to make it over the top, won't want to quit or give up and all of a sudden you have lost speed and are tipping to the side where your foot is high. (and by murphy's law) the side where the hill falls away, cactus, rocks......

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by haaki
    You'll want to make it over the top, won't want to quit or give up and all of a sudden you have lost speed and are tipping to the side where your foot is high. (and by murphy's law) the side where the hill falls away, cactus, rocks......
    I partially agree here, but sometimes you just can't make it (loose balance or spin out). You still should practice twisting your foot out from almost any pedal position, especially if the side you are falling to has your foot in the high position.

  39. #39
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    Yeah point taken......its not so much the climbs that concern me.....its the descents, having a huge crash, and being clipped to the bike, where as i wasnt before, or coming close to one and not having the ability to stick a foot out and have a dab to regain control.......

    It will all come i suppose....there is a reason most have them, they are better......
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  40. #40
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    Well from personal experience (YMMV), most of the your falls will be from going up

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    I have 3 years of experience on the shimano 647's. I think they excel for descending. I just bought a pair of Crank Bros Candy C's (beyond bikes has them for $44 right now!), in an attempt to lighten up my rotational mass. I tell you, 647's are heavy, and you can really feel a difference in that rotational mass. The Candy's are more than half as light. But, if weight isn't an issue, the 647's are bombproof and set em and forget em.

  42. #42
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    Can anyone comment on how the cage of the M647s feel under foot when clipped in? I'm currently looking for a SPD pedal with more foot support and more of a "platform" feel when doing some faster runs. Currently using M520 pedals with Shimano MT31 shoes.

    Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by madstace
    Can anyone comment on how the cage of the M647s feel under foot when clipped in? I'm currently looking for a SPD pedal with more foot support and more of a "platform" feel when doing some faster runs. Currently using M520 pedals with Shimano MT31 shoes.

    Thanks.

    Feels very stable. Paired with shimano shoes, you will be standing on the platform.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by madstace
    Can anyone comment on how the cage of the M647s feel under foot when clipped in? I'm currently looking for a SPD pedal with more foot support and more of a "platform" feel when doing some faster runs. Currently using M520 pedals with Shimano MT31 shoes.

    Thanks.
    I feel that they give more foot support than regular clipless pedals.

    It is also nice because if you restart on an uphill, and miss the clip in(which only happens on this pedal if you put the foot on too far forward) you have a better base to make a couple pedal strokes on until you can slide your foot back a little, and then it goes right into place. They are real easy to clip into.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by madstace
    Can anyone comment on how the cage of the M647s feel under foot when clipped in? I'm currently looking for a SPD pedal with more foot support and more of a "platform" feel when doing some faster runs. Currently using M520 pedals with Shimano MT31 shoes.

    Thanks.
    madstace - The 647s feel very stable and confidence inspiring. They're also very easy to clip into and out of. The platform is also great for those times when you can't quite get clipped in before taking off. I'm using Sette Element shoes which work great and were only $45 from PricePoint. Good luck...

  46. #46
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    Time ATAC Pedal

    I think that the Time ATAC pedals are the best. I've been riding with them for years and they are the best. They are tough and they are a good all round pedal.

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    Thanks to jamusT, twowheelsdown2002 and lipton for your feedback, think this might be my next upgrade!

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    As i stated earlier in this thread, i have gone with the Time Atac Z controls, got them on the bike....have not had a chance to ride with them yet, but a big concern of mine was the bearings, how good they would be, esecially in comparsion to my DMR V12's....gotta say they are awsum, just as smooth......will take me while to get used to these as i havnt really riden clipless a great deal...but its lookin good so far....top quality at a good price...
    Hold on 2 your f***n fillings !!!!!

  49. #49
    Pin it to win it
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    Not to hijack the thread too much, but I've been wondering about this a bit too. I've been running clips for several years right now, and overall I really like them, especially in technical sections. However, I've been doing a lot of riding in snow and mud lately where my SPDs have become useless, so I've been rocking some Wellgo B25 pedals. I've really been liking them, not so much for technical sections, but for those tight, loose corners where I feel I can really throw the bike hard into the corner and still have that foot available if I slide.

    Of course, I can stop the slide with clips too, but then usually I have to bother with getting my foot back in, which slows me down. So generally while clipped in I'll just take the corner a bit slower to avoid the situation at all. But I really do like how the flats encourage me to push it a bit more.

    SO! I like the idea of something that is a clipless pedal (on both sides), but has at least a bit of a platform so I can still be okay charging the next section even if I don't get clipped back in right away.

    So far, I've mostly been looking at the Crank Bros Acids, they seem like a good platform and are rather light. I'm not a huge weight weenie, but I checked and those 647s everyone is raving about weigh quite a bit more then the beefy DH flat pedals I'm running now!

    Any ideas?

  50. #50
    mtbr member
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    594

    if you are having issues in mud and snow

    just avoid any SPD. There is a reason the only guys who race cyclocross who use them are getting paid to use them (sposored)

    Time, Crank Bros and now Look have far superior mud shedding ability. They also have about 1/3 the parts so they are more durable and easier to maintain

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