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  1. #1
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    Is this bad for my bike?

    Ive been strapping my bike down in the back of my truck. I use the lockout on the front fork then strap it down to the tie downs in my truck bed... its only to transport to and from riding spots... never keep it like that overnight or anything.

    Just wondering if this is bad for the forks... it only compresses the front fork a tiny bit cause the lockout switch is flipped on. What do you guys think??

    Since the first time I did this I also started strapping down the rear tire so the rear end doesn't slide around when I'm driving up the canyon roads...

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  2. #2
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    Personally I wouldnt say "bad" being the abuse forks are designed to take, but I wouldnt pull down any tighter than you have to, just enough to hold the bike, not putting heavy pressure on the lockout. Strong advise though (learned a few things about trusting ppl in general or even ppl you know but wouldnt really call friends) get a solids cable and lock to lock it to the tiedowns in the truck bed. My "paranoia" since I couldnt afford to replace my bike atm, that screams "Hey nice bike, quick easy money, NO LOCK". Person with truck or simply guy walking and has pocket knife could be gone with that in the time it took you to grab a water from cooler in gas station, those few secs your eyes arent on it.

    beyond that, They make various things for truck bed mount for bike hauling if your interested. I use locking fork mounts, with brinks hd "round style" locks. Hell to try and get bolt cutters on anything to cut it loose as fork mounts are designed thick, just to make it hell on anyone trying to get a bike off. I have 2 in my truck bed, one for me, one for sons or brothers bike (gotta get a third in there at some point). I even lock up my sons 20" Trek,lol. Plus i have braided reinforced cable with lock to lock bikes together and to the bed, just to cost that much more time trying to get a bike out.
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  3. #3
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    Maybe being a bit paranoid, but my worry would be popping the shocks if you torqued down too hard on the straps.

    It's also a poor way to secure the bike as unless you really torque down and compress the suspension your going to get movement when the suspension compresses.

    If it where me i'd keep the anchor point, strap extend the straps and put one of either side of the rear swinging arm.
    I'd then use another set of straps anchored to the rear of the bed and attach each strap to each side of the fork bottoms.

    That way you're securing the bike without compressing the shocks.


    If you're intending to use the pick up to transport the bike on a regular basis though i think something like either of these would be a better solution.



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  4. #4
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    I do it all the time. However, I don't use the lockout on my fork. Just leave it open, push it down and snug up the straps. The compressed fork keeps it nice and tight to the floor and front wall of the bed. The rear doesn't move on mine either....I don't strap it at all.

    A riding buddy recently gave me three bolt on QR clamps and I've mounted them up on a 2x4 that I strap down into the bed. This work well, as I can now haul 3 bikes without having to figure out how to make it work with 3 different bikes each time.

  5. #5
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    I haven't stood a bike up in the bed of my truck(s) for decades. I'm always alone, and IMO no rack's needed if you've only got one bike back there.

    If I crash hard enough to lose the bike, then I'm probably more worried about the airbag up my nose than about any bike damage.
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  6. #6
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    I’m not saying what you are doing is bad for your bike, but I personally prefer to do the opposite.

    I put my bike in backwards, hook each tie-down to a seat rail & then to the corners of the truck…my thinking was about how pressure was being applied to my fork, I didn’t like the idea of pressure being applied to the fork in a direction is was not designed to handle…horizontal vs. vertical…seems like it would lead to premature wear on the bushings.

    When you tighten it this way the rear suspension compress’s a bit holding it in place, but in my mind with a force it’s designed to handle.

    Also I run a bungee through the rear wheel and front wheel…essentially hooking them together with one loop…this prevents the front wheel from turning sideways.

    I’m not an engineer and I did not sleep at a Holiday in Express last night …just my thoughts

  7. #7
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    Why not just lay down the bike in your truck bed? I feel if you only have one bike in your truck and are strapping it down like a motorcycle, you are trying to show off your bike.

  8. #8
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    Is this bad for my bike?

    I have a Bed Rug in the back of my pick up and I just lay the bike down . Never had an issue
    Chances are .. You're full of !$@&?

  9. #9
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    Not bad for it at all. No adverse or unusual loading is occurring there. The forks see more load with you sitting on the bike than the tie downs exert. Nothing internally is bothered by it either. Coil springs don't wear out from compressing, they were out from cyclic loading or cycling between compression and extension. With an air spring, when compressed all you are doing is increasing the pressure inside the air chamber. No different than if the air pressure was set for a larger rider. As far as the damper goes, it is just a piston passing through oil. Once the oil has moved passed the piston, and the piston is static, there are no forces going on there.
    This has been talked about at length on dirt bike forums and I see no reason the same wouldn't apply.

  10. #10
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    there's a good chance you're going to die.
    nothing witty here...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2w4s View Post
    there's a good chance you're going to die.
    lol.
    but... a good chance?
    everyone dies.

  12. #12
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    I think I really like this design, is it just PVC pipe? Don't need similar rack in the front of the bed? Does it travel well? Looks like it'd be nice in a shuttle rig, just throw the rack in the cab when riding.

    Quote Originally Posted by cbr6fs View Post
    If you're intending to use the pick up to transport the bike on a regular basis though i think something like either of these would be a better solution.


  13. #13
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    If I had a truck, I'd just get one of those gate blankets and throw it in . . . messing around with racks, tie-downs, etc. unnecessarily complicates the simplicity of a truck. Hell, just throw the thing in there . . . its a mountain bike after all, not fine china.
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  14. #14
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    Agreed, for one bike. But with 3-4, some kind of rack/stand would be nice.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by volklrevolution1 View Post
    Agreed, for one bike. But with 3-4, some kind of rack/stand would be nice.
    on a truck? tailgate pad is the easiest and best solution ever, $75 and you can carry 1-6 bikes.
    nothing witty here...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2w4s View Post
    on a truck? tailgate pad is the easiest and best solution ever, $75 and you can carry 1-6 bikes.

    This.

  17. #17
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    man I want that rack. Personally only reason I still own a truck (got rid of big dodge ram and got a s10) is for hauling bikes and occasionally camping gear. Plus just helpful to have a truck when needed. The rack would be awesome cause constantly taking the front wheel on and off does get annoying when just going from home to trails and back.

    This thread got me thinking now,lol.....
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  18. #18
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    Is this bad for my bike?

    I made a 3 position rack for my truck and I tie them down with a strap behind the fork and on top of the tire. Once the strap is set to the right length for the bike I can hook it in and out without adjusting, the tire gives enough to keep tension but still allow fast unhooking. It pivots at the top so I can still use the full bed for 4'x8' sheet material. I used to just put the bikes in the bed but they bounced around and into each other too often for my liking. This is a link to a pic that shows it.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/m/viewe...42813676985602

  19. #19
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    No.

  20. #20
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    Thanks to everyone for the replies... its a brand new bike and just wanted to make sure I'm not gonna mess up the front forks by just strapping it in for now.

    I might get a bed mat in the future but I don't want the bike sliding around in the bed and getting all banged up, esp. with the way I drive !

    My second car is a 4Runner so I might get a hitch rack for that someday, but right now I'm trying to limit my spending to just the necessary upgrades on the bike.

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