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  1. #1
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    The average all mountain bike weight is ....

    Average Weight: 32.9 lbs

    Standard Deviation: 3.9 lbs

    Which means many AM bikes weigh between 29.0 lbs and 36.8 lbs

    weight based upon this thread

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    Average Weight: 32.9 lbs

    Standard Deviation: 3.9 lbs

    Which means many AM bikes weigh between 29.0 lbs and 36.8 lbs

    weight based upon this thread
    Oh really? What about my abundantly sub-25 5.5" travel front and rear Mojo with 180/160 disks and 2.4/2.25 tires? Ok that one is very light but one, but what about this one at 25 pounds? http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...81#post3045381 Being doing a bit of pick and choosing, ah

    One could probably point to hundreds of people riding allmountain sub-29 pounds 5.5" travel bikes (just start with a Blur LT, INTENSE FRO, YETI 575 Mojo ... to just name a few)

    PS from the statistician in me: mentioning the standard deviation is quite meaningless for a distribution that is obviusly truncated.
    Last edited by Davide; 05-22-2007 at 07:41 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    Average Weight: 32.9 lbs

    Standard Deviation: 3.9 lbs

    Which means many AM bikes weigh between 29.0 lbs and 36.8 lbs
    Interesting. Anyone care to guess when the average will be below 30? (More low end AM bikes might keep this figure up.)

    AM was probably much heavier as an average before the bikes that Davide pointed out started being built.

    Also look at the Spec Enduro, my 06 is a (beautiful) big fat pig, while the 07 is under 30 stock.

    Lighter and bigger squish seems to be the trend...

    Mr. P

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    Oh really? What about my abundantly sub-25 5.5" travel front and rear Mojo with 180/160 disks and 2.4/2.25 tires? Ok that one is very light but one, but what about this one at 25 pounds? http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...81#post3045381 Being doing a bit of pick and choosing, ah

    One could probably point to hundreds of people riding allmountain sub-29 pounds 5.5" travel bikes (just start with a Blur LT, INTENSE FRO, YETI 575 Mojo ... to just name a few)

    PS from the statistician in me: mentioning the standard deviation is quite meaningless for a distribution that is obviusly truncated.

    I intentionally left out all the mojo nutters

    There was a 40 pounder listed as an all mountain bike in the thread

  5. #5
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    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.
    Spot on !~!

    AM was seeded primarily with XC and FR people. And, with tough light 5 to 7" frames being built these days you see everything from XC to FR builds.

  7. #7
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    I never have any fun riding my bike unless it's under 30 pounds.

    Oh, wait, I just realized... that's not true.

    Huh! Funny, that!

    I hate scales.
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  8. #8
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    If you keep posting in this thread we can keep updating the average AM weight

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    Oh really?

    [snip]

    Being doing a bit of pick and choosing, ah

    [snip]

    PS from the statistician in me: mentioning the standard deviation is quite meaningless for a distribution that is obviusly truncated.

    Fell asleep in the lecture? It can happen.

    One (1) standard deviation (sometimes expressed as "one sigma") away from the mean in
    either direction on the horizontal axis accounts for somewhere around 68 percent of the
    data points. Two (2) standard deviations, or two sigmas, away from the mean account for
    roughly 95 percent of the data points. Three (3) standard deviations account for about 99
    percent of the data points.

    If a curve is flatter and more spread out, the standard deviation would have to be larger in
    order to account for those 68 percent or so of the points. That's why the standard deviation
    can tell you how spread out the examples in a set are from the mean.

    How do you calculate the standard deviation? It's not too difficult, but it IS tedious, unless
    you have a calculator that handles statistics.

    Basically...

    1. Find the deviation "d" for each data point
    2. Square the value of d (d times itself)
    3. Sum (add up) all of the squares
    4. Divide the sum by the number of data points (n) minus 1
    5. Take the square root of that value


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  10. #10
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    For the longest time I was always concerned about the weight of my bike. After breaking frames and dealing with sub par but light forks, etc, I've decided that it really doesn't matter. I've built my Heckler with strong and durable parts w/o concern for weight. It probably weighs about 35 lbs, but like I said, I don't care. It rides just as well, better than any other bike I've had, and I don't have to worry about it. Obviously, you're not gonna want to ride around on a 45lb+ bike all day, there are limits here, but I really believe that the only people who should be that concerned about weight of bike are racers, XC freaks and weight weenies. Thats my 2 cents

  11. #11
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    anything over...

    For me anything over 36 pounds is too porky. My bike probably ways about 35 pounds, sun of a gun made a man out of me
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  12. #12
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    Ideal bike weight depends on rider weight, riding style and how long you expect the bike to last. For me at 200 lbs, my current AM bike weighs in at 33 lbs. I haven't yet seen anything significantly lighter that will do the job. All the bikes I've ridden below 30 lbs have felt like noodles.
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  13. #13
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    Totally wrong, Dog...

    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.
    We must know the "exact" answers for questions like this. I'm still wrestling with the age-old question of, "what is the average speed of an unladen African swallow?"

    Note: Bonus points for the first poster to guess which movie that useless bit of trivial came from.

  14. #14
    Get Down Do you
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    We must know the "exact" answers for questions like this. I'm still wrestling with the age-old question of, "what is the average speed of an unladen African swallow?"

    Note: Bonus points for the first poster to guess which movie that useless bit of trivial came from.


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    We must know the "exact" answers for questions like this. I'm still wrestling with the age-old question of, "what is the average speed of an unladen African swallow?"

    Note: Bonus points for the first poster to guess which movie that useless bit of trivial came from.
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  16. #16
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    Muggs, you win some useless Bonus Points...LOL!

  17. #17
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    " Whats the average speed of an unladden sparrow?"

    "AH.... africian or european?"


    My all mountain ride weighs in at around 33lbs and I just keep making it heavier,
    DHX be gone- your weight savings arnt worth the prformance gains of the CCDB coil.
    Intense 6.6..... Demo 9.

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P
    Interesting. Anyone care to guess when the average will be below 30? (More low end AM bikes might keep this figure up.)

    Mr. P
    Watching closely progression (or lack of thereof) in the XC weight weenie side, dont expect much out of it.
    Only way average would be bellow 30 if more XC oriented folks will add to it.

    My built (Nomad) is as high end as it can get. but it's sitting at 32lb and no way I'm putting any lighter component on it for stuff I'm riding.

    On another end, put Fox 140 fork (instead of 36 Talas), Crossmax SL class wheels (instead of XLs) , XC tires (instead of 2.4) and light pedals (instead of Mallets) and you got sub 30lb AM rig, the thing is only I don't wonna ride it
    I used to run tubes like you are, but then I got thorn in my wheel.

  19. #19
    TNC
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    Smartaleck!...LOL! You get extra useless Bonus Points.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.
    Only 2? I don't know... We'll have to wait for the latest marketing geniuses from MBAction to clarify this.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Locoman
    Only 2? I don't know... We'll have to wait for the latest marketing geniuses from MBAction to clarify this.
    It never ends just keeps expanding.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkeyfist23
    For the longest time I was always concerned about the weight of my bike. After breaking frames and dealing with sub par but light forks, etc, I've decided that it really doesn't matter. I've built my Heckler with strong and durable parts w/o concern for weight. It probably weighs about 35 lbs, but like I said, I don't care. It rides just as well, better than any other bike I've had, and I don't have to worry about it. Obviously, you're not gonna want to ride around on a 45lb+ bike all day, there are limits here, but I really believe that the only people who should be that concerned about weight of bike are racers, XC freaks and weight weenies. Thats my 2 cents
    Strangely, a lot of overweight and out-of-shape riders seem to obsess on bike weight, too.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    Spot on !~!

    AM was seeded primarily with XC and FR people. And, with tough light 5 to 7" frames being built these days you see everything from XC to FR builds.



    5 to 7" frames? (Mine's an 18)

    Jeeze!

    So, this is AM too?

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    Fell asleep in the lecture? It can happen.

    One (1) standard deviation (sometimes expressed as "one sigma") away from the mean in
    either direction on the horizontal axis accounts for somewhere around 68 percent of the
    data points. Two (2) standard deviations, or two sigmas, away from the mean account for
    roughly 95 percent of the data points. Three (3) standard deviations account for about 99
    percent of the data points.

    If a curve is flatter and more spread out, the standard deviation would have to be larger in
    order to account for those 68 percent or so of the points. That's why the standard deviation
    can tell you how spread out the examples in a set are from the mean.

    How do you calculate the standard deviation? It's not too difficult, but it IS tedious, unless
    you have a calculator that handles statistics.

    Basically...

    1. Find the deviation "d" for each data point
    2. Square the value of d (d times itself)
    3. Sum (add up) all of the squares
    4. Divide the sum by the number of data points (n) minus 1
    5. Take the square root of that value


    You still awake?



    What about confidence intervals?

  25. #25
    exacerbated member
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    I ride my 23 1/2 Lb Everest on All the mountains, down and up.

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