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  1. #1
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    The average all mountain bike weight is ....

    Average Weight: 32.9 lbs

    Standard Deviation: 3.9 lbs

    Which means many AM bikes weigh between 29.0 lbs and 36.8 lbs

    weight based upon this thread

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    Average Weight: 32.9 lbs

    Standard Deviation: 3.9 lbs

    Which means many AM bikes weigh between 29.0 lbs and 36.8 lbs

    weight based upon this thread
    Oh really? What about my abundantly sub-25 5.5" travel front and rear Mojo with 180/160 disks and 2.4/2.25 tires? Ok that one is very light but one, but what about this one at 25 pounds? http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...81#post3045381 Being doing a bit of pick and choosing, ah

    One could probably point to hundreds of people riding allmountain sub-29 pounds 5.5" travel bikes (just start with a Blur LT, INTENSE FRO, YETI 575 Mojo ... to just name a few)

    PS from the statistician in me: mentioning the standard deviation is quite meaningless for a distribution that is obviusly truncated.
    Last edited by Davide; 05-22-2007 at 07:41 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    Average Weight: 32.9 lbs

    Standard Deviation: 3.9 lbs

    Which means many AM bikes weigh between 29.0 lbs and 36.8 lbs
    Interesting. Anyone care to guess when the average will be below 30? (More low end AM bikes might keep this figure up.)

    AM was probably much heavier as an average before the bikes that Davide pointed out started being built.

    Also look at the Spec Enduro, my 06 is a (beautiful) big fat pig, while the 07 is under 30 stock.

    Lighter and bigger squish seems to be the trend...

    Mr. P

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    Oh really? What about my abundantly sub-25 5.5" travel front and rear Mojo with 180/160 disks and 2.4/2.25 tires? Ok that one is very light but one, but what about this one at 25 pounds? http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...81#post3045381 Being doing a bit of pick and choosing, ah

    One could probably point to hundreds of people riding allmountain sub-29 pounds 5.5" travel bikes (just start with a Blur LT, INTENSE FRO, YETI 575 Mojo ... to just name a few)

    PS from the statistician in me: mentioning the standard deviation is quite meaningless for a distribution that is obviusly truncated.

    I intentionally left out all the mojo nutters

    There was a 40 pounder listed as an all mountain bike in the thread

  5. #5
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    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.
    Spot on !~!

    AM was seeded primarily with XC and FR people. And, with tough light 5 to 7" frames being built these days you see everything from XC to FR builds.

  7. #7
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    I never have any fun riding my bike unless it's under 30 pounds.

    Oh, wait, I just realized... that's not true.

    Huh! Funny, that!

    I hate scales.
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  8. #8
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    If you keep posting in this thread we can keep updating the average AM weight

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    Oh really?

    [snip]

    Being doing a bit of pick and choosing, ah

    [snip]

    PS from the statistician in me: mentioning the standard deviation is quite meaningless for a distribution that is obviusly truncated.

    Fell asleep in the lecture? It can happen.

    One (1) standard deviation (sometimes expressed as "one sigma") away from the mean in
    either direction on the horizontal axis accounts for somewhere around 68 percent of the
    data points. Two (2) standard deviations, or two sigmas, away from the mean account for
    roughly 95 percent of the data points. Three (3) standard deviations account for about 99
    percent of the data points.

    If a curve is flatter and more spread out, the standard deviation would have to be larger in
    order to account for those 68 percent or so of the points. That's why the standard deviation
    can tell you how spread out the examples in a set are from the mean.

    How do you calculate the standard deviation? It's not too difficult, but it IS tedious, unless
    you have a calculator that handles statistics.

    Basically...

    1. Find the deviation "d" for each data point
    2. Square the value of d (d times itself)
    3. Sum (add up) all of the squares
    4. Divide the sum by the number of data points (n) minus 1
    5. Take the square root of that value


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  10. #10
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    For the longest time I was always concerned about the weight of my bike. After breaking frames and dealing with sub par but light forks, etc, I've decided that it really doesn't matter. I've built my Heckler with strong and durable parts w/o concern for weight. It probably weighs about 35 lbs, but like I said, I don't care. It rides just as well, better than any other bike I've had, and I don't have to worry about it. Obviously, you're not gonna want to ride around on a 45lb+ bike all day, there are limits here, but I really believe that the only people who should be that concerned about weight of bike are racers, XC freaks and weight weenies. Thats my 2 cents

  11. #11
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    anything over...

    For me anything over 36 pounds is too porky. My bike probably ways about 35 pounds, sun of a gun made a man out of me
    I don't have everything I want.

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  12. #12
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    Ideal bike weight depends on rider weight, riding style and how long you expect the bike to last. For me at 200 lbs, my current AM bike weighs in at 33 lbs. I haven't yet seen anything significantly lighter that will do the job. All the bikes I've ridden below 30 lbs have felt like noodles.
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  13. #13
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    Totally wrong, Dog...

    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.
    We must know the "exact" answers for questions like this. I'm still wrestling with the age-old question of, "what is the average speed of an unladen African swallow?"

    Note: Bonus points for the first poster to guess which movie that useless bit of trivial came from.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    We must know the "exact" answers for questions like this. I'm still wrestling with the age-old question of, "what is the average speed of an unladen African swallow?"

    Note: Bonus points for the first poster to guess which movie that useless bit of trivial came from.


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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    We must know the "exact" answers for questions like this. I'm still wrestling with the age-old question of, "what is the average speed of an unladen African swallow?"

    Note: Bonus points for the first poster to guess which movie that useless bit of trivial came from.
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  16. #16
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    Muggs, you win some useless Bonus Points...LOL!

  17. #17
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    " Whats the average speed of an unladden sparrow?"

    "AH.... africian or european?"


    My all mountain ride weighs in at around 33lbs and I just keep making it heavier,
    DHX be gone- your weight savings arnt worth the prformance gains of the CCDB coil.
    Intense 6.6..... Demo 9.

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P
    Interesting. Anyone care to guess when the average will be below 30? (More low end AM bikes might keep this figure up.)

    Mr. P
    Watching closely progression (or lack of thereof) in the XC weight weenie side, dont expect much out of it.
    Only way average would be bellow 30 if more XC oriented folks will add to it.

    My built (Nomad) is as high end as it can get. but it's sitting at 32lb and no way I'm putting any lighter component on it for stuff I'm riding.

    On another end, put Fox 140 fork (instead of 36 Talas), Crossmax SL class wheels (instead of XLs) , XC tires (instead of 2.4) and light pedals (instead of Mallets) and you got sub 30lb AM rig, the thing is only I don't wonna ride it
    I used to run tubes like you are, but then I got thorn in my wheel.

  19. #19
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    Smartaleck!...LOL! You get extra useless Bonus Points.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.
    Only 2? I don't know... We'll have to wait for the latest marketing geniuses from MBAction to clarify this.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Locoman
    Only 2? I don't know... We'll have to wait for the latest marketing geniuses from MBAction to clarify this.
    It never ends just keeps expanding.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkeyfist23
    For the longest time I was always concerned about the weight of my bike. After breaking frames and dealing with sub par but light forks, etc, I've decided that it really doesn't matter. I've built my Heckler with strong and durable parts w/o concern for weight. It probably weighs about 35 lbs, but like I said, I don't care. It rides just as well, better than any other bike I've had, and I don't have to worry about it. Obviously, you're not gonna want to ride around on a 45lb+ bike all day, there are limits here, but I really believe that the only people who should be that concerned about weight of bike are racers, XC freaks and weight weenies. Thats my 2 cents
    Strangely, a lot of overweight and out-of-shape riders seem to obsess on bike weight, too.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    Spot on !~!

    AM was seeded primarily with XC and FR people. And, with tough light 5 to 7" frames being built these days you see everything from XC to FR builds.



    5 to 7" frames? (Mine's an 18)

    Jeeze!

    So, this is AM too?

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    Fell asleep in the lecture? It can happen.

    One (1) standard deviation (sometimes expressed as "one sigma") away from the mean in
    either direction on the horizontal axis accounts for somewhere around 68 percent of the
    data points. Two (2) standard deviations, or two sigmas, away from the mean account for
    roughly 95 percent of the data points. Three (3) standard deviations account for about 99
    percent of the data points.

    If a curve is flatter and more spread out, the standard deviation would have to be larger in
    order to account for those 68 percent or so of the points. That's why the standard deviation
    can tell you how spread out the examples in a set are from the mean.

    How do you calculate the standard deviation? It's not too difficult, but it IS tedious, unless
    you have a calculator that handles statistics.

    Basically...

    1. Find the deviation "d" for each data point
    2. Square the value of d (d times itself)
    3. Sum (add up) all of the squares
    4. Divide the sum by the number of data points (n) minus 1
    5. Take the square root of that value


    You still awake?



    What about confidence intervals?

  25. #25
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    I ride my 23 1/2 Lb Everest on All the mountains, down and up.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick


    5 to 7" frames? (Mine's an 18)

    Jeeze!

    So, this is AM too?


    Just needs a gravity dropper, ODI Rogues and your good as gold

    A Lyric wouldn't be a bad idea either...

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronoranina
    For me anything over 36 pounds is too porky. My bike probably ways about 35 pounds, sun of a gun made a man out of me

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by uktrailmonster
    Ideal bike weight depends on rider weight, riding style and how long you expect the bike to last. For me at 200 lbs, my current AM bike weighs in at 33 lbs. I haven't yet seen anything significantly lighter that will do the job. All the bikes I've ridden below 30 lbs have felt like noodles.
    These are words of wisdom. I've had bikes below the 30 mark but the parts never lasted long (and were more expensive) and forks get noodly.... some frames got snapped.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorldWind
    I ride my 23 1/2 Lb Everest on All the mountains, down and up.
    hardtails for hardasses !~!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    We must know the "exact" answers for questions like this. I'm still wrestling with the age-old question of, "what is the average speed of an unladen African swallow?"

    Note: Bonus points for the first poster to guess which movie that useless bit of trivial came from.
    But far more relavent, what is the average velocity of a swallow riding an average AM bike? And is it African or European? And what if you have two swallows riding the same bike?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    But far more relavent, what is the average velocity of a swallow riding an average AM bike? And is it African or European? And what if you have two swallows riding the same bike?
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  32. #32
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    Some of us do care about weight while riding AM/FR.... I only weigh 125 pounds so a heavier bike becomes a bigger proportion of what I have to get up a mountain in order to come down. For example: my 28.5 pound 6" bike is about 23% of of my bodyweight or about 18% of the total bike/rider/pack weight. For someone who weighs 200 pounds an equivalent 23% of their body weight bike would weigh 46 pounds.

    Before you get going, I'm no physicist, and I know there's plenty of variables I'm ignoring. I do know the total amount of Work I have to do to get up the mountain is a lot less than a 246 pound bike/rider package. There are advantages and disadvantages to being a featherweight.

    The only "lighter" components I'm running are spinergy XC wheels, which have taken everything I've thrown at them and took almost a pound off the bike. Everything else is stock Bionicon, except the Gravity Dropper that I wouldn't wanna be without. Theoretically I should be able to get much more weight off it, but I don't have the money, and I'm not really looking to shave a minute or two off a 60 minute climb. I'm just looking to have fun.

    But I'd be interested to hear others take on the bike as a percentage of total mass approach...
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanga
    Some of us do care about weight while riding AM/FR.... I only weigh 125 pounds
    People like you, HAB or even my son at 110 i totally understand a -32lb bike for AM. The twist on that would be a FR/DH rider that is really hucking & very fast on the DH then the weight comes up again to keep everything together. The average my guess would be about 175+ around here.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Oh jezz there are at least 2 categories of AM but there could be more. There is XC/AM those are the weight weenies, then there are the AM/DH 40lbs is just fine, no whining just riding.

    well put!
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanga
    But I'd be interested to hear others take on the bike as a percentage of total mass approach...
    It's a consideration, but I think it's not such a big deal if you have extended climbs with a steady pace. In rolling terrain, where you need to sprint up small hills to keep your speed up, it will really work you.

    The wife's (115lb) Moto Lite is about 30lb,,, it keeps getting heavier and she keeps get faster on the DH.

    I'm 150lb and my XC bikes have been 27,30,37 & 35 lbs. The 37 & 35lb builds have been the only ones enjoyable to me on the DH. A lot of that weight is in the tires. 1500g front and 1000g rear - tubeless. No more constant snakebites and minimal rim dings .
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  36. #36
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    .............................................
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    .............................................
    Well I saw your reply via email, but it's gone now. I won't quote it, but I think it's pretty off base. For one thing, the weight of the front of the bike is very important for my wife when lofting the front wheel in technical terrain and/or slow speed drops. Cycling up a smooth hill might be a endurance sport, but technical moves also requires strength. Two different types of muscle fiber.
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71
    It's a consideration, but I think it's not such a big deal if you have extended climbs with a steady pace. In rolling terrain, where you need to sprint up small hills to keep your speed up, it will really work you.

    The wife's (115lb) Moto Lite is about 30lb,,, it keeps getting heavier and she keeps get faster on the DH.

    I'm 150lb and my XC bikes have been 27,30,37 & 35 lbs. The 37 & 35lb builds have been the only ones enjoyable to me on the DH. A lot of that weight is in the tires. 1500g front and 1000g rear - tubeless. No more constant snakebites and minimal rim dings .
    I have to agree with your first paragraph.... most of my riding in So Cal comprises sustained climbs of a few thou vertical, 45 min to 2 hours, followed by extended, technical descents. The Edison rocks on the descents (at 28.5 pounds), and compared to my 24 pound Sugar 1 XC bike, the difference is not terribly significant time-wise on a climb since I'm not racing.

    Handling though, is a different story. I didn't see Ferday's email, but your response about the heft of the bike being important for handling for us featherweights, especially lifting the front wheel over stuff, makes a big difference. I'm strong for my size so it's less a consideration for me than for your wife. My old XC bike I'd ride technical stuff with lots of finesse and careful line picking. The lighter bike dictated and allowed that type of riding. But for the type of riding I do, it wasn't the right bike. The 6" bike is much more point, shoot, hang on and grin! (pics on my profile...)

    Soon I'm stepping up to a 7" rear/6" front bike that comes stock at 32 pounds (Bionicon Supershuttle), and will probably do the same... put on lighter wheels to help the climbs, but not much else. I expect to get it to around 30 pounds and change. The slacker angles are what I'm looking forward to, and the extra couple of pounds overall weight for downhill bombing was really nice when I demoed it. The adjustable geometry (65 - 71 deg) still makes it a fairly nimble climber.

    I run tubeless as well...forgot to mention that. I usually run about 18 - 22 pounds on the 2.35's and can get great traction and haven't dented the rims yet. One of the featherweight advantages, no doubt
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    People like you, HAB or even my son at 110 i totally understand a -32lb bike for AM. The twist on that would be a FR/DH rider that is really hucking & very fast on the DH then the weight comes up again to keep everything together. The average my guess would be about 175+ around here.
    I'm not quite that light- more like 145. My bike currently sits a 35.5, though it'll lose 2# when I get the new wheelset together. Plenty light enough for me.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    I'm not quite that light- more like 145. My bike currently sits a 35.5, though it'll lose 2# when I get the new wheelset together. Plenty light enough for me.
    And im gonna quit drinking beer, i'll loose 5lbs
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    And im gonna quit drinking beer, i'll loose 5lbs
    ....that would be more like a 15 pounds savings

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    ....that would be more like a 15 pounds savings
    I shoulda said cut back
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    Muggs, you win some useless Bonus Points...LOL!
    and some Shrubbery...

  44. #44
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    I would say the average weight is between 27 and 36 pounds. With the average being about 31
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  45. #45
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    what does it even matter
    i have a giant pistol that is more towards freeride than crosscountry but its 37 pounds
    what does it matter
    i smoke people with 29 pound bikes up hills all the time on a single pivot when they have lock out
    so stop complaining geez
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  46. #46
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    what does the bike weight matter
    cuz i have a fully tricked out giant pistol that is more freeride than crosscountry
    it weighs 37 pounds
    and i smoke people with sub-30 pound bike up hills all the time
    on a single pivot when they have their 5000 dollar carbon bike with lock out
    its not the arrow its the indian
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  47. #47
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    what are you guys complaining about weight for
    my bike is a single pivot and its around 37 pounds
    i still smoke Mr. 5000 dollar carbon bike boy all day long
    who cares and its not the arrow its the indian if you know what i mean
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djponee
    what are you guys complaining about weight for
    my bike is a single pivot and its around 37 pounds
    i still smoke Mr. 5000 dollar carbon bike boy all day long
    who cares and its not the arrow its the indian if you know what i mean

    Wow it must be amazing going thru life everyday as you. I mean being you must be like winning the lottery everyday. Such eloquence, grace, and style. Perhaps you should sell tickets to meet you or at the very least have your own TV show because a person such as yourself people must be clamoring to be you. .. WOW just WOW ... A round of applause for you because you are just an amazing person.
    Progression is fine just remember to respect your roots.



    Click to see my Orange Ano Blur LT

  49. #49
    exacerbated member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djponee
    <snip>its not the arrow its the indian if you know what i mean,<snip>







    I know what you mean.

    But in Muggsly’s case he has no arrow only a stick, and while he thinks he is poking you with it is his foot that bleeds.

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