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  1. #1
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    Astro Engineering has an AM frame w/ Horst Link

    Interesting...the company that made my frame (Sette Flite AM) seems to have gotten their hands on the Horst Link rights...

    http://www.astroeng.com.tw/productsdetail.asp?id=6



    Compare to the old model:


    Has anybody seen the new frame in the wild? I know it's nothing exciting, but it is a good bang for the buck.

  2. #2
    maker of trail
    Reputation: essenmeinstuff's Avatar
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    Anyone outside the US has the "rights" to use that design

    If you see this frame getting imported to the US, then they are paying spec.

  3. #3
    usually cranky
    Reputation: b-kul's Avatar
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    how much does one of these cost/ where can i get one. looks pretty interesting.

  4. #4
    Resident Texican
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    Ok, I'm confused. What is the difference between the two frames? They look almost exactly the same to me.
    F@%K! Where the hell did that rock come from?!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texico
    Ok, I'm confused. What is the difference between the two frames? They look almost exactly the same to me.

    Suspension design.

    Look at the pivot near the rear wheel dropouts. On the Flite you will see it is up on the seat stays. On the Astro bike it is on the chain stays.

  6. #6
    Resident Texican
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    Ahh ok, thanks.
    F@%K! Where the hell did that rock come from?!

  7. #7
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    with the horst link it's much more interesting than without. Reminds me of the azonic saber i'm riding ,not as beefy in the front end,i think the saber is indefukinstruckable. A friend of mine once siad that non horst linked rear suspension bikes break alot of swing arms,by the dropouts.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbn
    with the horst link it's much more interesting than without. Reminds me of the azonic saber i'm riding ,not as beefy in the front end,i think the saber is indefukinstruckable. A friend of mine once siad that non horst linked rear suspension bikes break alot of swing arms,by the dropouts.
    Your friend is wrong, sort of.

    Plenty of horst link bikes fail in those areas too, there's a lot of stress and movement going through the swingarm.
    By the same token plenty of both types of design don't fail there because they've been properly designed/made/mainstained.

    Main advatange of a Horst link is that it has less pedal feedback and brake jacks marginally less than a single pivot. Disadvantages is they don't carry momentum as well as most single pivots (which usually have more rearward inital axel path, better across roots/rocks). But a good rider can compensate for this.

    They can also be quite flexy as the rear wheel is on the end of a long wishbone, but designers generally engineer around it.

  9. #9
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    Isn't the angle of the swingarm between the main pivot above the bottombracket and the horstlink pivot a downward angle,so the axle path would be more rearward than the single pivot. That angle sort of creates the lock out effect under pedaling pressure,as an example the first gen giant nrs had very low horst links at the bottom of those very large dropouts, they locked out to much,so they changed them. The lockout effect of the horst link seems almost as if it should be personalized, a very strong rider can make the suspension lockout more than necessary,it's sort of a power to weight issue.

  10. #10
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    Reputation: singletrack's Avatar
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    I prefer that my rear axle be connected to the mainframe by as few pivots as possible.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbn
    Isn't the angle of the swingarm between the main pivot above the bottombracket and the horstlink pivot a downward angle,so the axle path would be more rearward than the single pivot.
    Nope, horst link bikes actually develop a forward axle path. The dropout rotates in the opposite direction to the swingarm, keeping the chaingrowth low, which is why they don't pedal feed back much.

    Single pivots tend to have the most rearward path of the popular suspension designs (and chain growth/feedback, unless the pivot is concentric to the bb), although it depends entirely on where the pivot is placed. Other four bar systems like VPP and DW link produce S and U shaped axle paths respectively.

    I recommend you try the free version of this http://www.bikechecker.com/bikelib.phtml
    It's better at explaining it than me.

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