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  1. #1
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    Anyone had to fix a tubeless tire yet?

    Anyone had to fix a tubeless tire yet?

    If so what is the trick? Did you use HUTCHINSON REPAIR TUBELESS REPAIR KIT?

    I am hearing it is the best
    Always pay it forward!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by skos
    Anyone had to fix a tubeless tire yet?

    If so what is the trick? Did you use HUTCHINSON REPAIR TUBELESS REPAIR KIT?

    I am hearing it is the best

    I just use leftovers from inflatable raft repair kits - rafting shops give away the leftover chunks for free and it works great.

  3. #3
    I think I need to Upgrade
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    It depends on the damage that was inflicted on the tire. My friend has used those cotton/glue/silicon type plugs that you push in with a pointed tool before and they work very well for punctures and cuts about 1/2" or smaller in size. He even used them on a sidewall gash on a trip we took to Gooseberry last year.

  4. #4
    BCR
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    Just had my first UST flat - ran over a piece of glass on the trail. Pulled the tire off, dried out the inside with a hairdryer, sanded the inside of the tire around the spot where the glass poked through (or you could use Brake-Klean to degloss, as you have to be careful sanding as it is easy to take away too much material), then used the hairdryer to heat the inside of the tire, applied the patch from some old bike tire patch kit I had sitting around and let dry. Then realized that I had also pinch flatted the sidewall from riding on the flat tire, so I threw a scoop of Stan's sealant in, pumped it up, and have been riding on it ever since. Easy as pie...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCR
    Just had my first UST flat - ran over a piece of glass on the trail. Pulled the tire off, dried out the inside with a hairdryer, sanded the inside of the tire around the spot where the glass poked through (or you could use Brake-Klean to degloss, as you have to be careful sanding as it is easy to take away too much material), then used the hairdryer to heat the inside of the tire, applied the patch from some old bike tire patch kit I had sitting around and let dry. Then realized that I had also pinch flatted the sidewall from riding on the flat tire, so I threw a scoop of Stan's sealant in, pumped it up, and have been riding on it ever since. Easy as pie...
    How do you do that out on the trail?
    Always pay it forward!

  6. #6
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    Out on the trail, you throw on the tube that you have in your backpack to be able to ride out.

    You do all that once you get home.
    Quote Originally Posted by My Avatar
    WOOF!
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker
    Out on the trail, you throw on the tube that you have in your backpack to be able to ride out.

    You do all that once you get home.
    Your correct, I always ride with a spare tube. So far never had to use it
    I have never removed the Presta valve. How tough is it?

    just trying to be prepared for some of these 25+ mile rides with cactus in the trail
    Always pay it forward!

  8. #8
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    Super Glue.

    No really, it actually works really well. I got a slash probably 3/4 of an inch long vertically down my sidewall. Apply a bunch of super glue, wait for it to dry, and it worked great.

    Your correct, I always ride with a spare tube. So far never had to use it
    I have never removed the Presta valve. How tough is it?
    Removing the Presta valve isn't hard... getting the tire off the rim is quite hard. Doable, just takes forever.
    Speed has never killed anybody. Suddenly becoming stationary... that's what gets you.

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  9. #9
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    In my case, non UST wheels, I use Stan's strips. So the removal is no problem.

    BTW, I just use the same ole patches I used to patch tubes with, to repair gashs in tires. Done 3 allready, and no issues with any of them repairing them that way.
    Quote Originally Posted by My Avatar
    WOOF!
    My videos on Vimeo

  10. #10
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    I recently repaired a pretty gaping sized hole by gluing a piece of an old tube to the inside of the tire. I used Gorilla Glue and after three rides it seems to be holding up well.
    Last edited by KYMtnBkr; 07-24-2009 at 08:39 AM.

  11. #11
    Its got what plants crave
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    Most of the blowouts have been catastrophic failures that I couldn't patch, like damage to the bead from nailing big rocks at speed or coming down from jumps onto square edged rocks when I misjudged the jump. I have had two that were easily patched with the Hutchinson patch kit. Those ones were big enough that Stan's wouldn't seal it.
    Ocala Mountain Bike Association - www.omba.org

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by KYMtnBkr View Post
    I recently repaired a pretty gaping sized hole by gluing a piece of an old tube to the inside of the tire. I used Gorilla Glue and after three rides it seems to be holding up well.
    I'm not sure if you're still active on MTBR but now that you're surely more than three rides in (five years later,) I'd love to hear how well that repair held up over time. So it was just Gorilla Glue and a piece of old tube? Gorilla Glue is flexible but I wouldn't expect it to be bike tire-flexible.

  13. #13
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    shoe goo plus old sidewall, better fix

  14. #14
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    Crazy glue works on things stans won't seal up.
    Its easy to unscrew the valve core to pop a tube in, as long as your weren't an idiot, like I was recently, and used pliers to tighten it up. Then that thing is not coming off on the trail, and you're walking home.

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