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  1. #1
    The guy with 5 kids
    Reputation: Climb-n-Bomb's Avatar
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well Anybody have this problem??

    Just got a new all mountain rig(upgrade from a Haro R5) to a Blur LT, much beefier from wheel set to longer travel fork as well(pike 454). Went on first real ride wed am and had difficulty with keeping front wheel tracking on steep and steep tech climbs. The head angle is more slack already and i know with the pike made it even more slack from my old 130mm fork on the Haro. I noticed when looking at the two bikes that I had at least double the amount of spacers under my stem on the Blur.
    Anybody have this same issue? how many spacers or amount of space did you reduce it to?

    Thanks for any help

    dave

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: laurenlex's Avatar
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    Move all your spacers to the top of the stem. Give it a shot, it's free to try.

    Also free is a different technique. On steep climbs, slide forward on the seat so your 'taint is riding on the nose of the saddle. Not very comfy, but helps weight the front end.

  3. #3
    The guy with 5 kids
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    Thank you for the tip, Even sliding to the nose of the saddle was not enough, i was having to completely get out of the saddle. I will give it a go this weekend thanks

  4. #4
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
    Reputation: crisillo's Avatar
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    as laurenlex said, play with the spacers.. moving them all on top could be a bit extreme... I would start from the position where your grips are level with your saddle and then move "down" from there as needed...but just try until you feel comfortable with it

  5. #5
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    I know, it is terribly unfashionable, particularly among the AM riders. Still, bar ends would help a lot, both increasing leverage on steep climbs and allowing to move the weight forward more conveniently.

  6. #6
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    saddle

    Are you running a zero setback post? Can you slide the saddle forward some more on the rails?

    Longer stem or wider bars might help also.

  7. #7
    Master of None
    Reputation: presslab's Avatar
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    Pull in with your arms and stick your elbows out when on the techy climbs. However it's not comfortable for long steep climbs and that's where an adjustable travel fork is nice.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
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    We ALL have that problem when we use longer-travel forks. There is NOTHING you can do with spacers and stuff to eliminate it.

    The way that you fix this is to either just get stronger and ride in a higher gear that allows you to balance easier OR use an adjustable travel/lock-down type fork that allows the fork to get lower for the climbs. My 7" travel front fork goes down to about 2" of equivalent height, which makes climbing MUCH easier. When it gets steep there's no way I can keep the front end on the ground when my fork is extended to the 7" setting.

    That's kind of related to why I don't ride a fox 36. I feel the talas is too linear, does not have enough adjustability for progression (a different problem though), is a bit "sticky", and it sinks a bit in it's travel. It does have adjustable travel, but I'd much rather have an adjustable-travel fox vanilla 36, if they made one I'd go for it, but I can't complain about my 66 at all, it's simply amazing.

    The point though is that if you're going to do serious climbs, you need a way to lower that front end and keep the wheel on the ground.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
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    Having a longer wheelbase also helps climbing. For example, my Coiler has a 44 inch wheelbase with a 543 mm fork (36 RC2 @160mm) and my SX Trail has a 46.5 wheelbase with a 555 mm fork (66 RC2X@170mm). The SXT actually climbs up steep stuff better... wheel stays on the ground. Go figure.
    [SIZE="2"][SIZE="1"]Intense 5.5 | Specialized SX Trail II | Kona Dawg Primo [/SIZE][/SIZE]

  10. #10
    www.derbyrims.com
    Reputation: derby's Avatar
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    With a taller fork on the same bike, bend your elbows a little more and, bump your seat forward like others have said - and raise it about half as much to keep good reach. You'll adapt to the change in a couple rides.

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