Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 69
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    456

    Anybody abandon their dropper?

    I'm sure there's been a thread like this before, but I'm too damned lazy to actually check.

    Anyway, just wanted to see how many of you dropper post riders have actually switched BACK to riding a straight post. I just got back from visiting with my fiance's family in the UK for 3 weeks and rode there lots with my dropper post (Command Post Blacklight). For lack of a better description, the post was SH*T once the muck, mud, and water got to it.

    Most riders we saw on the trail weren't riding with one, and after a couple rides I decided to ditch it and go back to a straight post. Honestly, I didn't miss it much. Less fuss to deal with and more enjoyment of just riding.

    I loved the dropper post since I got it, but now I'm wondering how much I really NEED it. I'll probably use it for Enduro races, but otherwise, I think I'm done with it.

    Anyone else have the same or similar experience?

  2. #2
    GAME ON!
    Reputation: saturnine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4,971
    when my reverb broke i switched back to a regular thomson. i'm still using the thomson.
    RIP Adam Yauch

    "M.C. for what I AM and do, the A is for Adam and the lyrics; true"

  3. #3
    All this harmonica stuff
    Reputation: Haint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,485
    I have never considered it as an option, so that'd count for abandoning one somehow.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,400
    I'm about to go out on my first ride on one, I'll let you know

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    330
    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm sure there's been a thread like this before, but I'm too damned lazy to actually check.

    Anyway, just wanted to see how many of you dropper post riders have actually switched BACK to riding a straight post. I just got back from visiting with my fiance's family in the UK for 3 weeks and rode there lots with my dropper post (Command Post Blacklight). For lack of a better description, the post was SH*T once the muck, mud, and water got to it.

    Most riders we saw on the trail weren't riding with one, and after a couple rides I decided to ditch it and go back to a straight post. Honestly, I didn't miss it much. Less fuss to deal with and more enjoyment of just riding.

    I loved the dropper post since I got it, but now I'm wondering how much I really NEED it. I'll probably use it for Enduro races, but otherwise, I think I'm done with it.

    Anyone else have the same or similar experience?
    How does a straight post increase the enjoyment of riding? I can see ditching the dropper if you don't use it but I can't figure out how it would increase the enjoyment of riding. Did you test to see if you got the same enjoyment increase by riding without pressing the dropper post button?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Whip Chop!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    244
    I've switched back. I had a KS i900 lever adjust. Really liked it at first but never felt like it made my riding any faster necessarily. The lever adjust vs. remote meant I had to time when I was going to raise and lower it just right. After about 6 months the post started to develop problems, would pogo, sag and by the end wouldn't stay compressed. I sent it to KS for service and they re-built it no problem and functioned perfectly again. They have great service. I ended up selling it on ebay.

    While the KS was away I put a Thomson on there and my bike dropped 3/4 of a lb. Paired with a high quality adjustable seat post collar (Hope Tech) I actually prefer not having the dropper. Simpler, bomb-proof and easy. Did an Enduro race with it this summer and it was perfect. I had the post up on the un-timed climbs and down for the timed sections. The short climbs in the race I stood out of the saddle and hammered the pedals anyway. Weekly rides are the same. Most rides start with a sustained climb then I drop the seat all the way down for the decent or intermediate if it's a mixed/rolling trail.

    I will eventually entertain owning a dropper again but am going to give it time seeing as EVERY post available right now has some sort of issue, no matter how small. I'm keeping my eye on the Thomson release. To me, $400 could go towards any number of items that would make a dramatic difference on bike performance (wheels, high quality disc brakes, etc.).

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    330
    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm sure there's been a thread like this before, but I'm too damned lazy to actually check.

    Anyway, just wanted to see how many of you dropper post riders have actually switched BACK to riding a straight post. I just got back from visiting with my fiance's family in the UK for 3 weeks and rode there lots with my dropper post (Command Post Blacklight). For lack of a better description, the post was SH*T once the muck, mud, and water got to it.

    Most riders we saw on the trail weren't riding with one, and after a couple rides I decided to ditch it and go back to a straight post. Honestly, I didn't miss it much. Less fuss to deal with and more enjoyment of just riding.

    I loved the dropper post since I got it, but now I'm wondering how much I really NEED it. I'll probably use it for Enduro races, but otherwise, I think I'm done with it.

    Anyone else have the same or similar experience?
    How does a straight post increase the enjoyment of riding? I can see ditching the dropper if you don't use it but I can't figure out how it would increase the enjoyment of riding. Did you test to see if you got the same enjoyment increase by riding without pressing the dropper post button?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,517
    I'm entertaining the idea of going back to a Thomson after my Joplin started leaking air and not going back up. It'll hold air for a week or so and go flat. CB want's $50 to replace the air seal. I'm thinking it's better spent on a new quality rigid post. I'd love to get the new Thomson dropper but at $400, I think of other things to spend that money on.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: monty797's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    632
    I went back to a straight post this year. I've ridden droppers for a few years now and always liked em. I realized this year that I almost never used the dropper pretty much for anything I was riding.

    I dumped it and never really looked back. I don't even really miss it, of course I can still see the benefits of it and some people love em. I guess I've moved on.

  10. #10
    usually cranky
    Reputation: b-kul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    9,979
    i had a reverb. never used it much though. basically was adding like a pound on my bike so i just took it off.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: General Mayhem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    19
    After years of avoiding droppers because of the cost, weight, lack of reliability & extra clutter on the bike I took the plunge a couple years back.

    Despite all the drawbacks I am a hopeless addict.

    The dropper gets used dozens of times every time I ride my bike, I absolutely love having the ability to select the perfect seat height at the touch of a button. But, as with all things bike related, to each their own its all about enjoying the ride.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    456
    Quote Originally Posted by smellurfingers View Post
    How does a straight post increase the enjoyment of riding? I can see ditching the dropper if you don't use it but I can't figure out how it would increase the enjoyment of riding. Did you test to see if you got the same enjoyment increase by riding without pressing the dropper post button?
    I'm just saying that it increased the joy of riding without having to worry about dropping the post. Just one less thing to think about. I know some people will say "it just becomes natural, like switching gears"-and that was true for me-but simplifying things (to me at least) makes just the simple act of riding more enjoyable. It's a personal thing. I can't say that the drop post didn't add another "fun" aspect to riding, but where I'm at right now, I just want things as simple as possible.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    456
    Quote Originally Posted by General Mayhem View Post
    After years of avoiding droppers because of the cost, weight, lack of reliability & extra clutter on the bike I took the plunge a couple years back.

    Despite all the drawbacks I am a hopeless addict.

    The dropper gets used dozens of times every time I ride my bike, I absolutely love having the ability to select the perfect seat height at the touch of a button. But, as with all things bike related, to each their own its all about enjoying the ride.
    I absolutely agree. I was an addict when I started riding them a couple years back. I'm sure I'll go back (esp) for racing, but I'm definitely enjoying the simplicity that a straight post brings to my riding. It's almost like stepping back in time! End of the day though, to each their own.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Herzalot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    245
    I had a KS i900 'cause all the cool kids were using one. I used it for a while, then realized I usually stop at the top of extended descents to put on elbow pads and re-group from the climb. I can adjust my seat height then. I also stop at the bottom to wait for my friends and take off pads for the next climb. I ditched my KS when it developed the inevitable problems and went back to a simple Thomson. Ahhhhhh, clean, light and simple.

    When I ride with fast people who have dropper posts and/or ride a lot of up and down terrain, I can see the advantage of a dropper post. I have been on rides where I can't stop to adjust my saddle unless I want to get dropped myself. Now that the KS LEV seems to have it figured out (and no cable movement), I may try again, when I have $400 I don't want.

  15. #15
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3,165
    Nope.

    I belong to the NDA, and before I'd lay down my Dropper you'd have to "rip from my cold, dead, hands".

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by Whip Chop! View Post

    EVERY post available right now has some sort of issue, no matter how small. I'm keeping my eye on the Thomson release. To me, $400 could go towards any number of items that would make a dramatic difference on bike performance (wheels, high quality disc brakes, etc.).
    You should look into a Gravity Dropper. It is bomb proof. The ugly boot keeps all of the muck out of the mechanism. The mechanism of the post is just a simple spring with a retaining pin. I can take the thing apart and put it back together in 5 minutes. I just converted my 4" drop to a 3" multi position drop since the post was too tall for my larger frame. The parts were $30 and they shipped it in two days. It took me 3 minutes to convert it. You can't do that with any other post on the market. They sell all of the parts on their website if you do need to replace something.
    Yes, every post has some sort of issue. The GD has no mechanical issues I can think of. The only issues are the fact that some people don't like the looks and the cable routing on the turbo model can be funky.
    To answer the original question; no, I would not ever give up my dropper. It is too useful and too much fun.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    330
    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm just saying that it increased the joy of riding without having to worry about dropping the post. Just one less thing to think about. I know some people will say "it just becomes natural, like switching gears"-and that was true for me-but simplifying things (to me at least) makes just the simple act of riding more enjoyable. It's a personal thing. I can't say that the drop post didn't add another "fun" aspect to riding, but where I'm at right now, I just want things as simple as possible.
    Would you get the same enjoyment if you left the dropper on and didn't touch the button?

    DO you still lower your seat for technical sections or steep trails?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jgusta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    2,681
    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm sure there's been a thread like this before, but I'm too damned lazy to actually check.

    Anyway, just wanted to see how many of you dropper post riders have actually switched BACK to riding a straight post. I just got back from visiting with my fiance's family in the UK for 3 weeks and rode there lots with my dropper post (Command Post Blacklight). For lack of a better description, the post was SH*T once the muck, mud, and water got to it.

    Most riders we saw on the trail weren't riding with one, and after a couple rides I decided to ditch it and go back to a straight post. Honestly, I didn't miss it much. Less fuss to deal with and more enjoyment of just riding.

    I loved the dropper post since I got it, but now I'm wondering how much I really NEED it. I'll probably use it for Enduro races, but otherwise, I think I'm done with it.

    Anyone else have the same or similar experience?
    Me. Been running dropper posts off/on for almost 6-7 years now. First 4-5 years they never left the bike. Over the past couple of years, been phasing them out more and more and only use them when absolutely needed for very undulating trail riding terrain. So, it's fixed post (Thomson) for the majority of the time due to reliability and sound function of a fixed post. I was stoked to do a couple Enduro races without one last year and still place quite well due to format (Super D's would have to run them). This year, the only time my dropper will be going back on bike is for trip to Sedona this spring and Whistler trail riding this summer. FWIW, I have owned 2 GD posts (4", 5"), Reverb, KS 6". I always end up going back to the Thomson standard in the end.
    Ride On!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jgusta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    2,681
    Quote Originally Posted by Whip Chop! View Post
    I've switched back. I had a KS i900 lever adjust. Really liked it at first but never felt like it made my riding any faster necessarily. The lever adjust vs. remote meant I had to time when I was going to raise and lower it just right. After about 6 months the post started to develop problems, would pogo, sag and by the end wouldn't stay compressed. I sent it to KS for service and they re-built it no problem and functioned perfectly again. They have great service. I ended up selling it on ebay.

    While the KS was away I put a Thomson on there and my bike dropped 3/4 of a lb. Paired with a high quality adjustable seat post collar (Hope Tech) I actually prefer not having the dropper. Simpler, bomb-proof and easy. Did an Enduro race with it this summer and it was perfect. I had the post up on the un-timed climbs and down for the timed sections. The short climbs in the race I stood out of the saddle and hammered the pedals anyway. Weekly rides are the same. Most rides start with a sustained climb then I drop the seat all the way down for the decent or intermediate if it's a mixed/rolling trail.

    I will eventually entertain owning a dropper again but am going to give it time seeing as EVERY post available right now has some sort of issue, no matter how small. I'm keeping my eye on the Thomson release. To me, $400 could go towards any number of items that would make a dramatic difference on bike performance (wheels, high quality disc brakes, etc.).
    This
    Ride On!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jgusta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    2,681
    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm just saying that it increased the joy of riding without having to worry about dropping the post. Just one less thing to think about. I know some people will say "it just becomes natural, like switching gears"-and that was true for me-but simplifying things (to me at least) makes just the simple act of riding more enjoyable. It's a personal thing. I can't say that the drop post didn't add another "fun" aspect to riding, but where I'm at right now, I just want things as simple as possible.
    This for me as well as most infinite dropper posts will eventually not stay in one fixed position due to travel creep from contamination or wearing of seals or internals eventually before long despite proper maintenance. (accererlated by riding a lot in wet, bad weather). With exception of GD posts, I like knowing the post is in a certain fixed position at all times when climbing or descending and focus more on riding which equates to more fun. It's really personal preference like most things on bikes. Dropper posts do allow you to ride more, and more continuously on certain trails, thus leading to more fun and flow, but for some trails that mostly go all up to down, it's just another thing on bike to distract from the ride.
    Ride On!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    703
    Never...

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    877
    I talked toa guy who had a dropper post on my local trails which are hills so it's all up n' down every few minutes with no drops or very tech/nasty sections. He said he doesn't use it much. I'm not that tall so my post height isn't super high so it isn't difficult to lean back without the saddle being in the way. If there were drops, jumps, & lots of chunky rocks, I'd lower or want a dropper but like some have said, I dont' really want something else that could develop issues.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cerebroside's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    475
    Quote Originally Posted by General Mayhem View Post
    ...I am a hopeless addict.
    I think I use mine more than I change gears (2012 Reverb). I don't think I could ever go back without serious frustration.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    863
    Love it on my six inch for aggressive riding but not on my five inch more XC riding.

  25. #25
    I ride a Swarf
    Reputation: Stuart B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,234
    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Nope.

    I belong to the NDA, and before I'd lay down my Dropper you'd have to "rip from my cold, dead, hands".
    The only way to protect against bad people with droppers is to have good people with droppers!
    What exactly is a rigid hard tail?

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •