• 01-12-2013
    Pike14
    Anybody abandon their dropper?
    I'm sure there's been a thread like this before, but I'm too damned lazy to actually check.

    Anyway, just wanted to see how many of you dropper post riders have actually switched BACK to riding a straight post. I just got back from visiting with my fiance's family in the UK for 3 weeks and rode there lots with my dropper post (Command Post Blacklight). For lack of a better description, the post was SH*T once the muck, mud, and water got to it.

    Most riders we saw on the trail weren't riding with one, and after a couple rides I decided to ditch it and go back to a straight post. Honestly, I didn't miss it much. Less fuss to deal with and more enjoyment of just riding.

    I loved the dropper post since I got it, but now I'm wondering how much I really NEED it. I'll probably use it for Enduro races, but otherwise, I think I'm done with it.

    Anyone else have the same or similar experience?
  • 01-12-2013
    saturnine
    when my reverb broke i switched back to a regular thomson. i'm still using the thomson.
  • 01-12-2013
    Haint
    I have never considered it as an option, so that'd count for abandoning one somehow.
  • 01-12-2013
    bing!
    I'm about to go out on my first ride on one, I'll let you know :)
  • 01-12-2013
    smellurfingers
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm sure there's been a thread like this before, but I'm too damned lazy to actually check.

    Anyway, just wanted to see how many of you dropper post riders have actually switched BACK to riding a straight post. I just got back from visiting with my fiance's family in the UK for 3 weeks and rode there lots with my dropper post (Command Post Blacklight). For lack of a better description, the post was SH*T once the muck, mud, and water got to it.

    Most riders we saw on the trail weren't riding with one, and after a couple rides I decided to ditch it and go back to a straight post. Honestly, I didn't miss it much. Less fuss to deal with and more enjoyment of just riding.

    I loved the dropper post since I got it, but now I'm wondering how much I really NEED it. I'll probably use it for Enduro races, but otherwise, I think I'm done with it.

    Anyone else have the same or similar experience?

    How does a straight post increase the enjoyment of riding? I can see ditching the dropper if you don't use it but I can't figure out how it would increase the enjoyment of riding. Did you test to see if you got the same enjoyment increase by riding without pressing the dropper post button?
  • 01-12-2013
    Whip Chop!
    I've switched back. I had a KS i900 lever adjust. Really liked it at first but never felt like it made my riding any faster necessarily. The lever adjust vs. remote meant I had to time when I was going to raise and lower it just right. After about 6 months the post started to develop problems, would pogo, sag and by the end wouldn't stay compressed. I sent it to KS for service and they re-built it no problem and functioned perfectly again. They have great service. I ended up selling it on ebay.

    While the KS was away I put a Thomson on there and my bike dropped 3/4 of a lb. Paired with a high quality adjustable seat post collar (Hope Tech) I actually prefer not having the dropper. Simpler, bomb-proof and easy. Did an Enduro race with it this summer and it was perfect. I had the post up on the un-timed climbs and down for the timed sections. The short climbs in the race I stood out of the saddle and hammered the pedals anyway. Weekly rides are the same. Most rides start with a sustained climb then I drop the seat all the way down for the decent or intermediate if it's a mixed/rolling trail.

    I will eventually entertain owning a dropper again but am going to give it time seeing as EVERY post available right now has some sort of issue, no matter how small. I'm keeping my eye on the Thomson release. To me, $400 could go towards any number of items that would make a dramatic difference on bike performance (wheels, high quality disc brakes, etc.).
  • 01-12-2013
    smellurfingers
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm sure there's been a thread like this before, but I'm too damned lazy to actually check.

    Anyway, just wanted to see how many of you dropper post riders have actually switched BACK to riding a straight post. I just got back from visiting with my fiance's family in the UK for 3 weeks and rode there lots with my dropper post (Command Post Blacklight). For lack of a better description, the post was SH*T once the muck, mud, and water got to it.

    Most riders we saw on the trail weren't riding with one, and after a couple rides I decided to ditch it and go back to a straight post. Honestly, I didn't miss it much. Less fuss to deal with and more enjoyment of just riding.

    I loved the dropper post since I got it, but now I'm wondering how much I really NEED it. I'll probably use it for Enduro races, but otherwise, I think I'm done with it.

    Anyone else have the same or similar experience?

    How does a straight post increase the enjoyment of riding? I can see ditching the dropper if you don't use it but I can't figure out how it would increase the enjoyment of riding. Did you test to see if you got the same enjoyment increase by riding without pressing the dropper post button?
  • 01-12-2013
    the-one1
    I'm entertaining the idea of going back to a Thomson after my Joplin started leaking air and not going back up. It'll hold air for a week or so and go flat. CB want's $50 to replace the air seal. I'm thinking it's better spent on a new quality rigid post. I'd love to get the new Thomson dropper but at $400, I think of other things to spend that money on.
  • 01-12-2013
    monty797
    I went back to a straight post this year. I've ridden droppers for a few years now and always liked em. I realized this year that I almost never used the dropper pretty much for anything I was riding.

    I dumped it and never really looked back. I don't even really miss it, of course I can still see the benefits of it and some people love em. I guess I've moved on.
  • 01-12-2013
    b-kul
    i had a reverb. never used it much though. basically was adding like a pound on my bike so i just took it off.
  • 01-12-2013
    General Mayhem
    After years of avoiding droppers because of the cost, weight, lack of reliability & extra clutter on the bike I took the plunge a couple years back.

    Despite all the drawbacks I am a hopeless addict.

    The dropper gets used dozens of times every time I ride my bike, I absolutely love having the ability to select the perfect seat height at the touch of a button. But, as with all things bike related, to each their own its all about enjoying the ride.
  • 01-12-2013
    Pike14
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by smellurfingers View Post
    How does a straight post increase the enjoyment of riding? I can see ditching the dropper if you don't use it but I can't figure out how it would increase the enjoyment of riding. Did you test to see if you got the same enjoyment increase by riding without pressing the dropper post button?

    I'm just saying that it increased the joy of riding without having to worry about dropping the post. Just one less thing to think about. I know some people will say "it just becomes natural, like switching gears"-and that was true for me-but simplifying things (to me at least) makes just the simple act of riding more enjoyable. It's a personal thing. I can't say that the drop post didn't add another "fun" aspect to riding, but where I'm at right now, I just want things as simple as possible.
  • 01-12-2013
    Pike14
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by General Mayhem View Post
    After years of avoiding droppers because of the cost, weight, lack of reliability & extra clutter on the bike I took the plunge a couple years back.

    Despite all the drawbacks I am a hopeless addict.

    The dropper gets used dozens of times every time I ride my bike, I absolutely love having the ability to select the perfect seat height at the touch of a button. But, as with all things bike related, to each their own its all about enjoying the ride.

    I absolutely agree. I was an addict when I started riding them a couple years back. I'm sure I'll go back (esp) for racing, but I'm definitely enjoying the simplicity that a straight post brings to my riding. It's almost like stepping back in time! :) End of the day though, to each their own.
  • 01-12-2013
    Herzalot
    I had a KS i900 'cause all the cool kids were using one. I used it for a while, then realized I usually stop at the top of extended descents to put on elbow pads and re-group from the climb. I can adjust my seat height then. I also stop at the bottom to wait for my friends and take off pads for the next climb. I ditched my KS when it developed the inevitable problems and went back to a simple Thomson. Ahhhhhh, clean, light and simple.

    When I ride with fast people who have dropper posts and/or ride a lot of up and down terrain, I can see the advantage of a dropper post. I have been on rides where I can't stop to adjust my saddle unless I want to get dropped myself. Now that the KS LEV seems to have it figured out (and no cable movement), I may try again, when I have $400 I don't want.
  • 01-12-2013
    Miker J
    Nope.

    I belong to the NDA, and before I'd lay down my Dropper you'd have to "rip from my cold, dead, hands".
  • 01-12-2013
    dhelm72
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Whip Chop! View Post

    EVERY post available right now has some sort of issue, no matter how small. I'm keeping my eye on the Thomson release. To me, $400 could go towards any number of items that would make a dramatic difference on bike performance (wheels, high quality disc brakes, etc.).

    You should look into a Gravity Dropper. It is bomb proof. The ugly boot keeps all of the muck out of the mechanism. The mechanism of the post is just a simple spring with a retaining pin. I can take the thing apart and put it back together in 5 minutes. I just converted my 4" drop to a 3" multi position drop since the post was too tall for my larger frame. The parts were $30 and they shipped it in two days. It took me 3 minutes to convert it. You can't do that with any other post on the market. They sell all of the parts on their website if you do need to replace something.
    Yes, every post has some sort of issue. The GD has no mechanical issues I can think of. The only issues are the fact that some people don't like the looks and the cable routing on the turbo model can be funky.
    To answer the original question; no, I would not ever give up my dropper. It is too useful and too much fun.
  • 01-12-2013
    smellurfingers
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm just saying that it increased the joy of riding without having to worry about dropping the post. Just one less thing to think about. I know some people will say "it just becomes natural, like switching gears"-and that was true for me-but simplifying things (to me at least) makes just the simple act of riding more enjoyable. It's a personal thing. I can't say that the drop post didn't add another "fun" aspect to riding, but where I'm at right now, I just want things as simple as possible.

    Would you get the same enjoyment if you left the dropper on and didn't touch the button?

    DO you still lower your seat for technical sections or steep trails?
  • 01-12-2013
    jgusta
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm sure there's been a thread like this before, but I'm too damned lazy to actually check.

    Anyway, just wanted to see how many of you dropper post riders have actually switched BACK to riding a straight post. I just got back from visiting with my fiance's family in the UK for 3 weeks and rode there lots with my dropper post (Command Post Blacklight). For lack of a better description, the post was SH*T once the muck, mud, and water got to it.

    Most riders we saw on the trail weren't riding with one, and after a couple rides I decided to ditch it and go back to a straight post. Honestly, I didn't miss it much. Less fuss to deal with and more enjoyment of just riding.

    I loved the dropper post since I got it, but now I'm wondering how much I really NEED it. I'll probably use it for Enduro races, but otherwise, I think I'm done with it.

    Anyone else have the same or similar experience?

    Me. Been running dropper posts off/on for almost 6-7 years now. First 4-5 years they never left the bike. Over the past couple of years, been phasing them out more and more and only use them when absolutely needed for very undulating trail riding terrain. So, it's fixed post (Thomson) for the majority of the time due to reliability and sound function of a fixed post. I was stoked to do a couple Enduro races without one last year and still place quite well due to format (Super D's would have to run them). This year, the only time my dropper will be going back on bike is for trip to Sedona this spring and Whistler trail riding this summer. FWIW, I have owned 2 GD posts (4", 5"), Reverb, KS 6". I always end up going back to the Thomson standard in the end.
  • 01-12-2013
    jgusta
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Whip Chop! View Post
    I've switched back. I had a KS i900 lever adjust. Really liked it at first but never felt like it made my riding any faster necessarily. The lever adjust vs. remote meant I had to time when I was going to raise and lower it just right. After about 6 months the post started to develop problems, would pogo, sag and by the end wouldn't stay compressed. I sent it to KS for service and they re-built it no problem and functioned perfectly again. They have great service. I ended up selling it on ebay.

    While the KS was away I put a Thomson on there and my bike dropped 3/4 of a lb. Paired with a high quality adjustable seat post collar (Hope Tech) I actually prefer not having the dropper. Simpler, bomb-proof and easy. Did an Enduro race with it this summer and it was perfect. I had the post up on the un-timed climbs and down for the timed sections. The short climbs in the race I stood out of the saddle and hammered the pedals anyway. Weekly rides are the same. Most rides start with a sustained climb then I drop the seat all the way down for the decent or intermediate if it's a mixed/rolling trail.

    I will eventually entertain owning a dropper again but am going to give it time seeing as EVERY post available right now has some sort of issue, no matter how small. I'm keeping my eye on the Thomson release. To me, $400 could go towards any number of items that would make a dramatic difference on bike performance (wheels, high quality disc brakes, etc.).

    This :thumbsup:
  • 01-12-2013
    jgusta
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I'm just saying that it increased the joy of riding without having to worry about dropping the post. Just one less thing to think about. I know some people will say "it just becomes natural, like switching gears"-and that was true for me-but simplifying things (to me at least) makes just the simple act of riding more enjoyable. It's a personal thing. I can't say that the drop post didn't add another "fun" aspect to riding, but where I'm at right now, I just want things as simple as possible.

    This for me as well as most infinite dropper posts will eventually not stay in one fixed position due to travel creep from contamination or wearing of seals or internals eventually before long despite proper maintenance. (accererlated by riding a lot in wet, bad weather). With exception of GD posts, I like knowing the post is in a certain fixed position at all times when climbing or descending and focus more on riding which equates to more fun. It's really personal preference like most things on bikes. Dropper posts do allow you to ride more, and more continuously on certain trails, thus leading to more fun and flow, but for some trails that mostly go all up to down, it's just another thing on bike to distract from the ride.
  • 01-12-2013
    gunt pimp
    Never...
  • 01-12-2013
    bitewerks
    I talked toa guy who had a dropper post on my local trails which are hills so it's all up n' down every few minutes with no drops or very tech/nasty sections. He said he doesn't use it much. I'm not that tall so my post height isn't super high so it isn't difficult to lean back without the saddle being in the way. If there were drops, jumps, & lots of chunky rocks, I'd lower or want a dropper but like some have said, I dont' really want something else that could develop issues.
  • 01-12-2013
    cerebroside
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by General Mayhem View Post
    ...I am a hopeless addict.

    I think I use mine more than I change gears (2012 Reverb). I don't think I could ever go back without serious frustration.
  • 01-12-2013
    techfersure
    Love it on my six inch for aggressive riding but not on my five inch more XC riding.
  • 01-12-2013
    Stuart B
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Nope.

    I belong to the NDA, and before I'd lay down my Dropper you'd have to "rip from my cold, dead, hands".

    The only way to protect against bad people with droppers is to have good people with droppers!
  • 01-12-2013
    dhelm72
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bitewerks View Post
    I I'm not that tall so my post height isn't super high so it isn't difficult to lean back without the saddle being in the way. If there were drops, jumps, & lots of chunky rocks, I'd lower or want a dropper but like some have said, I dont' really want something else that could develop issues.

    It doesn't matter how tall you are or what your seatpost height is. If you have your seat set for proper pedaling position, your leg will be straight when the pedal is at the bottom of your stroke whether you are 5'1" or 7' 6".
    If you want to get your body over the rear wheel for gnarly downhill with your seat in this position, you will rack your nuts. It's not a matter of if you will rack them, it is a matter of when. Without a dropper, you have a few choices if you want your seat in an optimal pedaling position. You can ride in a suboptimal downhill position (over your seat), stop and drop the seat for gnarly sections, or ride less gnarly terrain.
    In the event that my comments might be misunderstood, I didn't say that you can't ride gnarly terrain without a dropper post. I am saying that any rider can ride gnarly downhill better when the seat is low and they can get their weight back over the rear wheel (which is proper technique). To accomplish this see my above comments.
  • 01-12-2013
    Stuart B
    I love my dropper for the reasons stated above, although I'll add that its more about being able to get low but keep weight on the front wheel rather than hanging over the back and losing front end grip.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
  • 01-12-2013
    bing!
    just came in drom my first ride. it awas amazing!

    not only do i drop it for the tech stuff, but. dropped it to for fast descents where i normally wouldnt with a qr seatpost. i was able to lower my cg and corner faster! it felt like riding a bmx.

    love it.
  • 01-12-2013
    Levi707
    I ran my reverb for a year then took it off since I found that I was actually not using it at all. I put my regular post back in and left it that way for about 9 months. I put my reverb up for sale but it never sold so I decided to just put it back on for the time being. In the last 5 weeks it has been back on my bike I have maybe pushed the drop button 5 times (3 of which were to show people how it worked........) Probably pulling it back off shortly. The weight savings is worth it.
  • 01-12-2013
    Pike14
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Stuart B View Post
    The only way to protect against bad people with droppers is to have good people with droppers!

    Hahahaha! Awesome.:thumbsup:
  • 01-12-2013
    dhelm72
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Stuart B View Post
    I love my dropper for the reasons stated above, although I'll add that its more about being able to get low but keep weight on the front wheel rather than hanging over the back and losing front end grip.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

    Interesting angle. I do use my dropper to stay low and neutral for better handling in fast and flowy downhill sections. In my previous post (nut racking), I was referring to those gnarly technical downhill sections where you have to hang over the back wheel just to keep from going over the bars. Front wheel grip is not an issue in this scenario.
    There is a certain level of steepness and rugged terrain that just can't be ridden with your weight over the seat. For these situations, I find a dropper post very convenient. This is especially true when these sections are immediately followed by uphill and then down again. I also reap the benefits of the dropper in more flowy sections (as you mention) where you want front and rear grip with a low center of gravity.
    If I didn't have a dropper, I would not lower the seat for those flowy downhill sections and would miss out on this huge benefit. With the dropper, I can seamlessly drop the seat for any section that a low center of gravity or rear weight shift would be beneficial.
  • 01-12-2013
    chopsuk
    just dropped my dropper on a newly built HT. not missing it that much but, tbh, haven't hit too many steep trails recently, so using the qr has been no trouble... yet..
    he says...eyeing gravity dropper on old ht.. still thinking about putting it on...
  • 01-12-2013
    Buzz Cut
    had a dropper on my old bike and loved it then the bike got stolen in LA. Bought a new bike and rode it for a month or so with a standard post. I hated having to stop to lower or raise the post. That said I bought a new Kind Shock w remote and have been loving having a dropper again.
  • 01-12-2013
    Hoban
    I change my QR seatpost SEVERAL times every ride. I can;t wait to spend the money on a dropper. It'll probably save me 10 minutes every time I go ride. :D
  • 01-12-2013
    2000Z3M
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Hoban View Post
    I change my QR seatpost SEVERAL times every ride. I can;t wait to spend the money on a dropper. It'll probably save me 10 minutes every time I go ride. :D

    It wont save you 10 minutes, it will give you 10 more minutes of riding time. :thumbsup:
  • 01-12-2013
    scrublover
    Some rides get little use from my dropper post, but there are enough rides where it gets enough use that it's staying on.

    Have dabbled a bit back with regular posts, but always end up putting the dropper back on after a few rides.

    Caveat: I'm one of those people who hasn't had much trouble with any of mine. Currently being used:

    Two Reverbs (one was DOA out of the box - its replacement has been fine for over a year. They have both needed a bleed about every six months. little enough and easy enough i don't mind.) One gets way, way more mileage than the other, but so far I've not been able to tell if that one is working any less well than the other.

    Two Gravity Droppers - one remote, one non-remote. One is near six years, the other near seven years old. The couple issues they've had were handled quickly, easily, painlessly by the company.
  • 01-13-2013
    Stuart B
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dhelm72 View Post
    Interesting angle. I do use my dropper to stay low and neutral for better handling in fast and flowy downhill sections. In my previous post (nut racking), I was referring to those gnarly technical downhill sections where you have to hang over the back wheel just to keep from going over the bars. Front wheel grip is not an issue in this scenario.
    There is a certain level of steepness and rugged terrain that just can't be ridden with your weight over the seat. For these situations, I find a dropper post very convenient. This is especially true when these sections are immediately followed by uphill and then down again. I also reap the benefits of the dropper in more flowy sections (as you mention) where you want front and rear grip with a low center of gravity.
    If I didn't have a dropper, I would not lower the seat for those flowy downhill sections and would miss out on this huge benefit. With the dropper, I can seamlessly drop the seat for any section that a low center of gravity or rear weight shift would be beneficial.

    Yeah I didn't word my answer properly. I agree abut meant the biggest benefit for me is getting a lower centre of gravity.

    I think that people that don't miss the dropper didn't change their riding style to suit (keeping the bike angle the same as the ride and not getting low), not saying that is wrong for them. Bit learning to lean the bike a bit more and getting lower has helped me, as well as not getting hung on the back of saddle after steep bits :).
  • 01-13-2013
    dwt
    My bike came with a Joplin which I used all this season and loved it.

    The problem is that I keep reading that all DP's eventually fail. If/when the Joplin dies, I will be faced with the prospect of trying to figure out which other heavy expensive unreliable DP to get. Vs. simply remounting simple light solid post sitting around doing nothing right now.

    Whoever invents a light, totally reliable DP with remote will die a multi-gazillionaire
  • 01-13-2013
    bitewerks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dhelm72 View Post
    It doesn't matter how tall you are or what your seatpost height is. If you have your seat set for proper pedaling position, your leg will be straight when the pedal is at the bottom of your stroke whether you are 5'1" or 7' 6".
    If you want to get your body over the rear wheel for gnarly downhill with your seat in this position, you will rack your nuts. It's not a matter of if you will rack them, it is a matter of when. Without a dropper, you have a few choices if you want your seat in an optimal pedaling position. You can ride in a suboptimal downhill position (over your seat), stop and drop the seat for gnarly sections, or ride less gnarly terrain.
    In the event that my comments might be misunderstood, I didn't say that you can't ride gnarly terrain without a dropper post. I am saying that any rider can ride gnarly downhill better when the seat is low and they can get their weight back over the rear wheel (which is proper technique). To accomplish this see my above comments.

    I don't have any gnarly terrain to ride. Hence my comment of having no jumps, drops, or chunky terrain. Should have added steeps in there too.

    Off-topic but I've always understood that your leg should be slightly bent when the pedal is at the bottom of the stroke. Looking at a few sites shows that position, not completely straight.
  • 01-13-2013
    bing!
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Hoban View Post
    I change my QR seatpost SEVERAL times every ride. I can;t wait to spend the money on a dropper. It'll probably save me 10 minutes every time I go ride. :D

    That's what I thought, but it gets better. You'll have better flow when the climb transitions to a descent. Challenging turns can be done with a lower CG, making them faster. Who lowers their saddles for turns? You will :)
  • 01-13-2013
    dhelm72
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bitewerks View Post

    Off-topic but I've always understood that your leg should be slightly bent when the pedal is at the bottom of the stroke. Looking at a few sites shows that position, not completely straight.

    Yes, that is correct. The most common height adjustment technique is to place the pedal at the furthest point with your heel on the pedal. You leg should be completely straight with no bend in your knees. This will give you a very slight bend in your knee when the ball of your foot is on the pedal.
    In this position, it is hard to get way back without racking your jewels. As mentioned previously, it is also a high center of gravity. Not necessarily the most optimal position for tight, twisty and flowy downhill either.
  • 01-13-2013
    dwt
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bitewerks View Post
    I don't have any gnarly terrain to ride. Hence my comment of having no jumps, drops, or chunky terrain. Should have added steeps in there too

    Not to be obnoxious, but what you describe doesn't sound like mountain biking, and certainly not "all mountain" as generally understood. In your terrain you not only don't need a DP, but might be better off without any suspension, front or rear, as well. How about a fully rigid cross bike? On a fire road, all you need is a bike with knobby tires.
  • 01-13-2013
    squareback
    I went back to a 400mm long carbon seat post, with a skinny 140mm seat, because I was really missing the flex.

    The aggressive seat is much more liveable with carbon post, and I can get back off the seat for most anything but full blown air.

    When I am racing I am trying to roll the jumps anyways.

    PS My Maverick speedball always wiggled back and forth and it never bothered me. Some people can't stand it.
  • 01-13-2013
    bitewerks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Not to be obnoxious, but what you describe doesn't sound like mountain biking, and certainly not "all mountain" as generally understood. In your terrain you not only don't need a DP, but might be better off without any suspension, front or rear, as well. How about a fully rigid cross bike? On a fire road, all you need is a bike with knobby tires.

    I don't recall asking for any bike advice...
  • 01-13-2013
    evasive
    I started a thread like this a year or so ago after I gave up on a Joplin 4. It was a POS, and I still have it in a parts bin and have a Thomson on my hardtail. But, I have used a Reverb on my FS frame for a season with no issues. I managed for a year or so without a dropper, and on our trails that tend to be mostly up and then down, I could manage. But my preference is to have a dropper if it doesn't cause a ton of headaches. I'll be curious to see how the Thomson shakes out. It looks promising.

    I'll add my voice to the chorus of riders who drop the saddle for cornering. Having the saddle slammed way down makes it a ton easier to lean the bike and carve a turn. Focussing on dropping the saddle for steep sections misses the biggest advantage they offer, IMO.
  • 01-13-2013
    aedubber
    I had a reverb on my enduro and it was great for the terrain i ride which consists of lots of ups and downs, some drops , rollers, and steep spots . I currently dont have a dropper yet but i DEF am in the market , just waiting out a bit . Really depends on the terrain you ride i guess.

    Unfort right now i have to either suffer on the climbs or descents .
  • 01-13-2013
    dwt
    1 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bitewerks View Post
    i don't recall asking for any bike advice...

    Attachment 753065
  • 01-13-2013
    aedubber
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dwt View Post

    LMAOOO as soon as i can spread more rep def sending your way . that sh1t cracked me up
  • 01-14-2013
    L. Ron Hoover
    The only way I'd consider abandoning my dropper is if I moved somewhere else. My local trails have lots of short, steep and technical ups and downs and I use my dropper probably as often as I shift. I can ride most of the descents with the seat up but they're much more fun with it down and that's what matters to me.

    If I lived somewhere with less technical trails or somewhere with really long climbs followed by long descents, I'd probably go back to a standard post as (IMO) those situations don't really benefit from a dropper.

    I must be one of the lucky ones. I've got 4 seasons in on my AMP and have only done the most basic maintenance.
  • 01-14-2013
    tomboyjr
    What a coincidence that the post before mine mentioned an AMP post. I have 4 or even 5 years on mine with 1 cable change and simple maintenance. Just recently the mount for the remote cracked, and while i was trying to figure out how to use a different company's remote my buddy made one for me at his machine shop. So all is well again.

    Problem was the AMP has the cable end at the post, most remotes work the other way.

    I also have 2 years on a Specialized post which has worked flawlessly on 2 different bikes.

    I wouldnt want to ride my trails without one. Even on our xc trails, there are rollers, skinnies, rock gardens and such that the dropper makes so much more fun.