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  1. #1
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    The Anti-Weight Weenie Thread: Adding Weight to Your Bike

    With almost everyone constantly doing everything to drop weight in search of the lightest bike possible, I'm curious to know how many of you have added weight to your bike in order to make it more capable. I figured it would be fun to talk about the opposite end of the spectrum for once.

    I took my Pivot Mach 5.7 from 28 lbs to around 30.3 lbs. I definitely worry about my bike less on very technical trails now. Here's what I thought were worthwhile weight additions.

    -Specialized Command Post BlackLite to get that seat out of the way on steep technical sections and drops
    -Beefy, High Volume tubeless tires at 800+ grams each for better grip and more protection through rocky terrain
    -203mm rotor front, 180mm rotor rear for the long descents, really steep trails, or just those oh sh*t moments
    -725mm bar cause narrow ones just don't cut it.

    What are some of your worthwhile weight additions?
    Gotta get up to get down.
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  2. #2
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    I would probably just gain more weight since it is so much fun eatting. I had a friend that says that losing weight is cheaper than thousands of dollars spent on lighter equipment.

  3. #3
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    Sure, adjustable seatpost, wider bar, stronger wheelset.

  4. #4
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    Coil fork and shock adds a 1.5 lbs (ti) to 2.5 lbs (steel).
    AM cranks such as Saint or Afterburner or Hammershmit
    Chain guide
    Remote drop post
    wide rims and tires

  5. #5
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    i felt this way for awhile, but now lately i've taken up with a group of guys that ride technical, tough trails but with hardtail 29ers. And while I love my Enduro, on these group rides i'm getting my ass kicked, and it's rough on the ego. Much of it is probably that they are better all round riders, but man, I must have 10/12 pounds more bike. It's so true - you just need more than one bike

  6. #6
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    Went from a QR fork to a 6 pound (and change) Marz 55R with 20mm through axle. Add a cheap 20mm front wheel for even more weight. A few months later, when the 55R Suntour cartridge crapped out, I converted it to an open bath (more oil). Now, my 39 pound Reign is really, really, really front heavy.

    I've seen guys on 20+ year old rusty Schwins pass me both going up and down various trails and fireroads. I figure riding a heavy bike will help get me there.

  7. #7
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    When I had my wheels built, I was all-too-easily talked into shiny golden alloy nipples. In the last month I've shorn four of those. Had my wheel rebuilt yesterday with brass, as it should be. Alloy nipples don't belong on mountain bikes.

  8. #8
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    If possible, coilover fork and shock (dunno if Pivot allows a coil shock or even if it's possible).

  9. #9
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    Went from 685mm carbon bars to 760mm aluminum. From 2.2 tires to 2.4. Adjustable seatpost.

    My riding partner has a Mojo that is down to 25 lbs. He's always joking that everytime he drops a pound, I add one. Sad thing is, I spend as much money adding weight as he does dropping it.

    Edit: I also put two FULL scoops of Stans in each tire. If I wanted to have to worry with flats, I wouldn't have gone tubeless.
    Addicted to the Classifieds

  10. #10
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    I don't think I've ever made a change to my bike that resulted in lower weight, I tend to build up a bike cautiously optimistic with parts from the lighter side of the spectrum and gradually add weight over time. the usual spots are tires and suspension. I'm currently contemplating/struggling to resist putting my Lyrik solo air DH back on my trailbike which currently has a 150mm Revelation. trying to tell myself the extra 10mm of travel and marginal stiffness gain is not worth the extra 1+ pounds. I also have a dropper post in the closet that will probably work its way back on the bike although for my riding (big ups followed by big downs) I'm less convinced of the value of a dropper.

    I don't think adding weight to your bike makes you an "anti weight weenie" unless you are adding stupidly heavy parts for the kind of riding you do. I try to run the lightest parts that will hold up to the abuse I dish out and give me the performance that I'm looking for. I think of myself as "weight conscious" more than a weight weenie though.

  11. #11
    meow meow
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaeckerX1 View Post

    -Specialized Command Post BlackLite
    how does that compare to a reverb? thinking of picking one up especially now that i ride a spec

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    how does that compare to a reverb? thinking of picking one up especially now that i ride a spec
    Not as smooth or easy to operate as the Reverb, but it works well enough. The mid position is hard to find at times. The thing I like about it is in most cases when it fails it should still be usable. You should be able to pull it up to the top position and lock it since it uses a locking collet to lock it in place. The Reverb would just sink when it fails, leaving you to do a lot of standing pedaling. The Reverb wouldn't fit on this frame so I'm using the Speshy one. It's probably my "second-best" option, but probably the best option for back country/high country rides where I'd be worried about the Reverb failing.
    Gotta get up to get down.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by have2ride2day View Post
    Edit: I also put two FULL scoops of Stans in each tire. If I wanted to have to worry with flats, I wouldn't have gone tubeless.
    I also add extra Stan's for piece of mind.
    Gotta get up to get down.
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  14. #14
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    in the process of adding a hammerschmidt which is probably gonna pork up my already tank of a mission

  15. #15
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    My second hand stock Whyte E4 so far is upto 28lb's :-

    More comfortable seat
    2.4 RR compared to a 2.1 Vapour Pro.
    2.3 Spesh Eskar front tire rather than another 2.1 Vapour Pro.

    The biggest difference I noticed was fitting a 180mm cheaper rotor on the front, the WW Hope rotor over heated like crazy, but doesn't fade on long descents so who cares.

    I expect stronger spokes and rims back and front soon

  16. #16
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    I went the other way My previous bikes were: bullit, heckler, 575 & blur LT. They were between 35 to 30lbs. I thought this is what I needed to go down hill fast in my area. My current bike is Mojo SL @ 25lbs and it goes down hill just as fast or faster in many section, but it climbs way better than any of my previous bikes

  17. #17
    Trail Rider
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    Remedy 9 stock was just over 29 pounds.
    Ditched the bontrager tires, went tubeless w/ 2.1 Nevegal rear/2.35 front w/ 2 scoops
    Race Face Atlas AM bar 28.5"
    KS Supernatural adj. seatpost.

    sitting @ 30.5 pounds and the bike rides so much better.
    Santa Cruz 5010 CC V2

  18. #18
    biking is fun
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    Quote Originally Posted by half_man_half_scab View Post
    When I had my wheels built, I was all-too-easily talked into shiny golden alloy nipples. In the last month I've shorn four of those. Had my wheel rebuilt yesterday with brass, as it should be. Alloy nipples don't belong on mountain bikes.
    Probably a bad wheel build to begin with then, more than likely over tensioned. I have been running alloy nipples on every wheel build for the last 5 years with zero issues whatsoever. I use them on anything from my XC to DH bike. Do nasty rocky descents, hit up to 25 foot gaps and 15 foot drops. Haven't even broke one yet.

    As for gaining weight, The best place for improved stability is also the worst place for pedaling uphill, the wheels.

    For me, I can no longer run anything less than a fox 36 or lyrik. My bikes are build to ride XC but be able to hit any drop or gap that is on the way down. so I will gladly add weight for more security. Also coil rear shocks are always a huge improvement.

    Typically I like my AM bikes in the 30-33 lb range.

    And lastly, I don't buy into the whole just lose/gain weight instead of taking it off or adding it to your bike. I think it would actually have an opposite effect. For instance gaining a ton of weight on a light bike would make the bike even more squirelly and easier to break the bike. Adding a ton of weight high up (you) will make your center of gravity higher. In the reverse, if you are really lightweight and your bike weighs a ton it will be hard for you to control and maneuver. No one can tell me that losing 2 lbs of fat will equal losing 2 lbs of rotational mass from your tires or wheelset. Generally when you are trying to lose weight off your bike, losing iweight from the wheels or high up like the saddle, post, handle bars, etc is the most beneficial.

  19. #19
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    08 Tr. Covert
    xfusion vengeance hlr
    steel coil ccdb
    Tr. Revolution 32s
    SLX drivetrain
    32lbish figure

    she's never been on weightwatchers so she rolls deep!

  20. #20
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    Some of the things mentioned in this thread aren't really anti weight weenie. They're just items you bought to make the bike fit you better, or items that set the bike up properly for the terrain you are riding. Having bars that are wide enough for your preferences/body size, an adjustable seatpost, and chain guides are not anti-weenie items. However, I'll play along.

    I use heavy ODI end plugs in case I seppuku myself with the handlebars.
    http://www.bikepartsplace.com/images/med/31865169.jpg

    I use four scoops of sealant per tire. I could get away with less, but unless I'm racing, I'd rather have enough in the tire to seal anything I feel like running over.

    I use rotors with aluminum carriers because for me, they stay true longer. This makes it easier to center my brakes and not have any rub. I also prefer rotors that have brake paths with less cutouts. Keeps my pads alive longer. These things translate to a heavy rotor.
    ***

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle2834 View Post
    Some of the things mentioned in this thread aren't really anti weight weenie. They're just items you bought to make the bike fit you better, or items that set the bike up properly for the terrain you are riding. Having bars that are wide enough for your preferences/body size, an adjustable seatpost, and chain guides are not anti-weenie items. However, I'll play along.
    It's just a fun thread. Don't over-analyze it. The title just got people to open it and read it is all. Besides, it's about increasing weight to better your ride instead of reducing weight. So, yes, anti-weight weenie. Weight Weenies often make sacrifices in durability and ride quality just to decrease weight.
    Gotta get up to get down.
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  22. #22
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    I like the idea of the thread, I just didn't want to see a million people talk about what handlebars they use. I mean no offense to those that already said handlebars.

    Quote Originally Posted by BaeckerX1 View Post
    Weight Weenies often make sacrifices in durability and ride quality just to decrease weight.
    Well, I think a distinction needs to be made here, since many of those making sacrifices in durability and ride quality do so for the purpose of a race bike.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle2834 View Post
    I like the idea of the thread, I just didn't want to see a million people talk about what handlebars they use.
    True, I know what you mean. Handlebars often don't make that much difference in weight really, but it all adds up. I know tires made a huge difference with increasing weight for me (my rear tire is over 1.8 pounds by itself), but it was very much worth it for the increased rock protection, grip, and cush. I could run lighter tires with less tread, but I think it would hurt my riding rather than help it. Maybe if I didn't live in Colorado I could get away with a less beefy tire. I used to be obsessed with having my bike below 30 pounds, but almost everything I did or looked to do to reduce weight resulted in decreased capability or too high a cost for no real performance gains. Now I'm quite content with my bike at 30.3. It's just a number on a scale.
    Last edited by BaeckerX1; 09-07-2011 at 02:44 PM.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle2834 View Post
    I like the idea of the thread, I just didn't want to see a million people talk about what handlebars they use. I mean no offense to those that already said handlebars.


    Well, I think a distinction needs to be made here, since many of those making sacrifices in durability and ride quality do so for the purpose of a race bike.
    Heh. Not all. For some it's about status and having the lightest bike possible. Have you seen the weight weenie forum? Plus the marketing inundates us all. Anytime you pick up a bike magazine or read a bike website it's about how lightweight and great a frame or component is. I know it's easy to succumb to the weight weenie demons, but I also know my bike seems to perform better through rock gardens and such with a little junk in her trunk.
    Gotta get up to get down.
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  25. #25
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    Good thread man! I added weight in all the ways you did and more. An MRP chain guide, SLX boat anchor rear deraillure. $40 bucks couldn't pass it up. Nevegal 2.5 single casing tires. I like straight wheels so I just built a rear wheel with lazerdisk DH rim. Just added a heavier shock. Monarch rc3. Next season the totem gets a coil instead of air. I'm roughly at 35 lbs.

  26. #26
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    I have a 06 specialized enduro and i know i could have it around thirty pounds or a little less but instead i added parts to make it super burly... put on a hadley/823 wheelset with 2.5 minions which is bombproof and an old 05 marz z150 which i absolutely love. I also replaced the dhx air for a RS vivid coil. Everything else is pretty normal but just those few parts add plenty of lbs and are very confidence inspiring!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Anti-Weight Weenie Thread: Adding Weight to Your Bike-315.jpg  

    Last edited by OS cuda'; 09-07-2011 at 07:25 PM.

  27. #27
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    My do all (mainly XC) is a Bullit @ 37lbs. I am considering going from solo air totem to coil totem and 2.5 minions to 2.7 minions. I would put a dropper post on if I wasn't rather cramped with a setback post.
    6'5" 230lbs
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  28. #28
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    I always try to remove some weight from one area if I'm going to add weight in another. Areas I can't escape weight are on the wheels and tyres and rear coil shock. I never cared much for light weight till I bought a carbon hardtail in addition to my duallie and my outlook has done a 180 - weight really matters.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravityfreaky View Post
    I always try to remove some weight from one area if I'm going to add weight in another. Areas I can't escape weight are on the wheels and tyres and rear coil shock. I never cared much for light weight till I bought a carbon hardtail in addition to my duallie and my outlook has done a 180 - weight really matters.
    I think it does to an extent. I wouldn't want to push a 40 lb bike up the Front Range climbs, but I think anywhere close to 30 lbs is pretty good for a do-it-all bike, and a bit heavier if you're doing significant jumps/drops. I do try and save weight where I can, but never at the expense of significant durability or reliability, and I'm not above adding weight if it will help my bike ride better.
    Gotta get up to get down.
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  30. #30
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    I have a Ibis HD as my do all bike. I keep trying to run some lighter weight tires on it for the longer more mellow rides I do (like something in the 700gram range). Inevitably, I always wind up slapping the 950gram Butchers SX back on.
    While the lighter tires feel great on the long never ending climbs, I always wind up overworking them when its time to go down. Whatever time/energy they save on the climbs gets lost when dealing with a slash in the tire or lost pressure due to burping/folding.
    So my source of weight addition is 500grams of tire love. Ultimately well worth it.

  31. #31
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    I keep ramming up my El Guapo but its all for functional purposes... currently ~35lb (not too sure cos I never took it to the scale)
    A bit more wt on "DH" run days with bigger rubbers. Normal time on trail I find its not so much if a heavier rubber is better (mostly on jungle trail, lots of roots and rock) but huge volume is really my kinda things..low psi lots of float and not having to fiddle with lo-comp too much

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by morandi View Post
    I have a Ibis HD as my do all bike. I keep trying to run some lighter weight tires on it for the longer more mellow rides I do (like something in the 700gram range). Inevitably, I always wind up slapping the 950gram Butchers SX back on.
    While the lighter tires feel great on the long never ending climbs, I always wind up overworking them when its time to go down. Whatever time/energy they save on the climbs gets lost when dealing with a slash in the tire or lost pressure due to burping/folding.
    So my source of weight addition is 500grams of tire love. Ultimately well worth it.

    yep, tires = instant gratification

  33. #33
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    I had one dedicated weight weenie bike, and it steadily gained a couple pounds. Tires, better fitting saddle, chunkier grips, different headset, wider bars, full length housing, brakes that do not suck (oh, boy, does Avid Ultimates suck).

  34. #34
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    Took my RIP9 from 27.5lbs to about 31.5lbs.

    -Burlier wheelset, went from American Classic hubs with Stans Crests to Stans Flows on Chris Kings

    RS Reverb dropper post

    Wider bar, shorter but heavier stem, 725mm RaceFace Atlas AM and 70mm AKA stem, had a 700mm flat bar and Thomson stem. Although I just got a Sunline Vone AM stem 65mm so that should be similar to the thomson

    Added bashguard, swapped 32t mid ring for 36t, now running a 22-36-Bash

    185mm rotors F and R

    Heavier tires, 2.4 front, 2.25 rear, both Ardents

    XT trail pedals, had regular XT's on it prior

    Rides so much better, notice the weight a bit on the climbs, but its a totally different bike on the downhills and technical stuff. Best decision I ever made for mountain biking was to not worry about the weight and build it how I wanted too.

  35. #35
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    same as you, OP, plus adding chainguide

    not sure on the weight gain from my RS reverb, but i'm pretty sure it was surprisingly small...like 1/3lb or so from previous stalk seatpost

    my bar is around 750 but its a chromag osx...very light anyway. no clue how much the bigger rotor costs weight wise but again gotta be pretty negligible

    tires, esp, front tire is something i view as a an absolute must.

  36. #36
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    I just went all coil on my bike. DHX shock and Lyrik Coil. Also put in some 2.4 Rubber Queens and a X Fusion Hilo Post.

    Took my RFX from 32lbs to 35-ish.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by eric_tfa View Post
    Took my RIP9 from 27.5lbs to about 31.5lbs.

    -Burlier wheelset, went from American Classic hubs with Stans Crests to Stans Flows on Chris Kings

    RS Reverb dropper post

    Wider bar, shorter but heavier stem, 725mm RaceFace Atlas AM and 70mm AKA stem, had a 700mm flat bar and Thomson stem. Although I just got a Sunline Vone AM stem 65mm so that should be similar to the thomson

    Added bashguard, swapped 32t mid ring for 36t, now running a 22-36-Bash

    185mm rotors F and R

    Heavier tires, 2.4 front, 2.25 rear, both Ardents

    XT trail pedals, had regular XT's on it prior

    Rides so much better, notice the weight a bit on the climbs, but its a totally different bike on the downhills and technical stuff. Best decision I ever made for mountain biking was to not worry about the weight and build it how I wanted too.
    Both my bikes have the big rings replaced with bashguards, but I used e13 TurboChargers and I don't think it added much weight, if any. If it did it wasn't noticeable. The Tomac Snyper has an e13 Heim 2 chainguide on it, but I can't run one on the Pivot due to no ISCG tabs and the press-fit BB. I'm using the same bar as you.

    I took off the stock wheelset because the rims were too narrow (DT-Swiss 350 hubs with DT X430 rims). I'm thinking of getting the wheels rebuilt with Flows instead using the same hubs. How are you liking the Flows?
    Gotta get up to get down.
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  38. #38
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    Yup. Somtimes i use high volume tacky dh tires. Other than that? No.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeerhillJDOG View Post
    yep, tires = instant gratification
    +1 the only parts on my bike where weight becomes a part of the decision process is tires and the difference in climbing with dh tires vs xc is incredible

  40. #40
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    Yes!! this thread is so much fun, and so true also!
    on my Mach 5.7, it all started with heavier grips (ok just few grams, but you know... , then replacing 160mm rotor (definitely too small, too on/off for longest downhills) with 185mm and adaptor, some more frame protection, 2x more Stan's in the tires...
    One thing I am really not ready to compromise are the wheels : i stick to customs Crest/Nobby for dynamics, but I have to admit I am not in the toughest downhill business.

  41. #41
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    Lol I definitely belong in this thread. My do-it-all bike weighs about 35 or so.160mm travel. I run a 2.5 Dissent up front and a 2.1 Weirwolf in the rear. I think the weirwolf is wider than 2.1, but that's what it's labeled as. I love having a big front tire; riding roots and rock gardens are so much more fun now.
    I have never considered weight while buying any component. As a matter of fact, everything i've bought has been heavier than the original. Wheelset, tires, seat, 203mm brakes. The only new part that i've got which is lighter is my SLX crankset... and i got a chainguide with it. I honestly don't care about weight. I've said it before and i'll say it again, Climbing is going to suck no matter what, might as well make bombing down more fun.
    I think i'll add that to my sig.
    It's not about what bike you ride, but how hard you tear it up

  42. #42
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    Good topic B,
    Beside the usual upweight of adj post, meaty tires, and beefy wheels they add more fun to trail riding as the margin of error is wider.

    I put Hammerschmidt to both my AM bike and XC bike it add 2 lbs to my bike but it's definitely a good thing. I clean more tech climb and can carry more speed and momentum into the climb. I find myself spinning out less as well as burning thigh in the middle of the climb. I can shift under full load on the climb you can't do that on the reg FD

    I have considered Rohloff for my bike a few times I love the action but not the engagement and the shifter it's such an awesome piece of engineering, with all the moving parts and it's still pretty light.

  43. #43
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    Really really bad squirm last night, bike couldn't hold a line at all especially in the rough stuff, so my DT 6.1 Rim + real spokes ( not triple butted wennie stuff ) + hope pro 2 hub has gone onto the E5, it's slowly getting heavier

    Slightly smaller rear tire aswell as I've still got a 717 there till I would out this Big Gripper hassle and order something tougher.

  44. #44
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    + 2 lbs .... zero regret

    I replaced my air shock w/ an Elka Stage 5 w/ Ti coil.

    And added a KSi950 dropper seatpost to my Nomad.

    Worth every ounce and then some.


  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaeckerX1 View Post
    Both my bikes have the big rings replaced with bashguards, but I used e13 TurboChargers and I don't think it added much weight, if any. If it did it wasn't noticeable. The Tomac Snyper has an e13 Heim 2 chainguide on it, but I can't run one on the Pivot due to no ISCG tabs and the press-fit BB. I'm using the same bar as you.

    I took off the stock wheelset because the rims were too narrow (DT-Swiss 350 hubs with DT X430 rims). I'm thinking of getting the wheels rebuilt with Flows instead using the same hubs. How are you liking the Flows?
    I actually have that bash as well, weight is probably similar to a 44t ring. I was worried about durability originally due to the sorta "honeycomb" feature, but its held up exceptionally well.

    I love the Flows, Gone down hard with them a few times and have been perfect. I built them myself using DT ProLock Alloy nipples and they have been great. Love the wider rim, and of course the ease of going tubeless. I recommend Stans wheels to everyone, think they are fantastic.

    The RF bar is great, had that bar on various bikes and always go back to it.

  46. #46
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
    Reputation: scrublover's Avatar
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    Dec 2003
    Posts
    8,687
    Same as many others - various tires, and dropper posts on all three mtbs now.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  47. #47
    GAME ON!
    Reputation: saturnine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    4,968
    i added heavier tires and a reverb
    RIP Adam Yauch

    "M.C. for what I AM and do, the A is for Adam and the lyrics; true"

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pulpwoody's Avatar
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    Jan 2006
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    428
    Fun thread.
    I've been making my Marin Attack Trail heavier every time I buy something, because I'm usually going for durability rather than weight. Since I've built it up:

    Hadley/Flow wheels.
    Command post
    Wider 745 bars
    203 front rotor
    tires, tires, tires.

    For a while, I was running a 2.5 Nevegal downhill on the rear. That thing is a TANK, but awesome. Extra cush, lots of traction, but just too heavy. Replaced it with a UST Nevegal (not that much lighter by the way).
    2.5 Minion up front, and the frame wasn't all that light to begin with.

    The one thing I did that made everything worth while was to replace the rear 11-32 cassette with a 11-34 cassette. Those extra two teeth made a whole world of difference on the climbs, and now the bike is big, heavy, strong and awesome.

  49. #49
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    E5's no longer a weenie, I tried to keep it light but 717's + 1.6mm spokes = SQUIRM was all over the shop, feels much better.

    I refuse to buy expensive lighter stuff cause generally it's weaker, but I'd buy expensive ish strong stuff, say a rear mech, deore weight but XT price and STRONG!!

  50. #50
    mtbr member
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    i instaled biger brakes a chainguide and iam going to install a remote seatpost for thecnical trails

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