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  1. #1
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    9point8 new dropper post???

    I came across this yesterday looking for info on a new dropper post.



    Looks like a Canadian company with a new post in the works and going customer direct according to the website. Home - Nine Point Eight Inc.

    The lever is interesting, I know the lever on my Gravity Dropper is the one thing I hate.

  2. #2
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    Looks alright, Id prefer not to take my finger off my brake though. Could be alot easier than I think though, I dont mind my reverb so I am sure this wouldnt be too bad either.
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  3. #3
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    so i got a little info about this post.

    (1:48:03 PM) me: 1. will it be offered with a traditional thumb activated lever,
    2. will there be a version with the cable attached at a fixed location instead of the head?,
    3. drop length(s)?
    4. any idea of price?
    i love the idea of a stepped and full drop system​ but taking my finger off my brake to use it is a scary thought.

    (1:49:18 PM) John: 1. no plans to offer a thumb lever at this time. I was skeptical about the index finger lever initially too, but it does work really well. Everyone that has tried it has liked it.
    (1:49:46 PM) John: 2. again, no plans at this time.
    (1:50:13 PM) John: 3. 100mm stroke, and it steps in 5mm increments (or full drop)
    (1:51:37 PM) John: 4. sorry, i can't give you any pricing details yet, though I will say, it is a premium product and will command a premium price. The stepping feature is really a game changer in our opinion.
    (1:52:04 PM) John: Regarding taking your finger off the brake lever, that was exactly my thought initially
    (1:52:33 PM) John: but i did find that the moments where i need my finger on the brake are usually also the moments I need my thumb securely wrapped around the bar!

  4. #4
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    I like the mechanism for putting the post down. It looks like you don't have to put pressure on it to drop the post. I love my Reverb but it can a slight pain to have to pressure the post to lower it.
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  5. #5
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    Taking the index finger off shouldn't be a problem if you brake with two fingers.

    Increments looks nice, pity it only has 100mm drop. I imagine what most people are concerned about would be reliability. Is it mechanical locking?

    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession View Post
    It looks like you don't have to put pressure on it to drop the post.
    He's definitely pushing on it to get it to go down.

  6. #6
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    Sorry, but infinite adustment in 5mm incriments is not game changing at all. Ditto for head cable attachment.

    Really looks like these guys took all the "undesireable" portions of a seatpost to make theirs. Pity as I would love to support a Canadian company.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    Taking the index finger off shouldn't be a problem if you brake with two fingers.

    Increments looks nice, pity it only has 100mm drop. I imagine what most people are concerned about would be reliability. Is it mechanical locking?



    He's definitely pushing on it to get it to go down.
    It looks like a ratchet system to lower it? Meh, maybe I'm wrong.
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  8. #8
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    Looks pretty interesting!
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  9. #9
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    I like the converting head to offset. 5mm is a small enough increments to be effectively infinite and not change the way you ride adversely(like with fixed stops) like the command post. More competition=better.

  10. #10
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    I like how it can be adjusted in small increments, not a new idea but always enjoyed that ability. Guess ill have to check back when more info comes available on the 21st via what Home - Nine Point Eight Inc. said.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by shelbster15 View Post
    I like how it can be adjusted in small increments, not a new idea but always enjoyed that ability. Guess ill have to check back when more info comes available on the 21st via what Home - Nine Point Eight Inc. said.
    Out of curiosity which other post had the stepper small increments adjustments?
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    Taking the index finger off shouldn't be a problem if you brake with two fingers.
    Taking a finger off the rear brake is not a big problem if you brake with front brake.

    Any idea on the weight?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeL View Post
    Out of curiosity which other post had the stepper small increments adjustments?
    Yeah, sorry that wasn't an accurate description on my part. I meant an adjustable seatpost in general. In reference to the hydraulic ones that let you set the height, but by no means are those exact. That 9point8 has taken it a step further and made it exact steps of travel which I like.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Sorry, but infinite adustment in 5mm incriments is not game changing at all. Ditto for head cable attachment.

    Really looks like these guys took all the "undesireable" portions of a seatpost to make theirs. Pity as I would love to support a Canadian company.
    I agree. I think the 5mm increment adjustment is rather gimmicky.

    What the heck is the difference between 1 inch of drop and 1.2 inches of seat drop? I either want my seat up for pedaling or slammed for downhill. Every once in a while I want it somewhere in between for rolling terrain but I don't need 5mm increments to find that position. There are already infinitely adjustable posts on the market that don't require you to ratchet the lever. I think it is easier to hold the lever and sit until the seat is where you want it and let go of the lever.

    I am a bit old school and have a gravity dropper. It has a spring and a pin. It goes up and down and is very reliable. I can choose between fully extended, 1 inch drop or 4" drop. I can't see why I would need any other settings in between. I'm not particular (or weenie enough) to need my seat dropped exactly 45mm for a section of trail.

  15. #15
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    The post doesn't require you to ratchet the lever... in the video he was just demonstrating the increments. I welcome a new competitor, it can only be good for the marketplace. Hopefully it's a good, reliable post.

  16. #16
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    Received my new post today on my way out of town for a bike trip. Just in time. It will be installed in the morning before we hit the trails.

    We're riding DH/free ride at Windrock tomorrow and then over to Pisgah for some trail riding. The pedal up and bomb down style of riding should be a great chance to try out the post.

    Will post some thoughts and a review. Photos coming too.

    Initial impression is that the quality is insanely high. Every part of the post and lever is very well thought out. Very very nice. Impressed.

  17. #17
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    Usd $499.00 (!)

  18. #18
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    Super easy install and set up. I volunteered to drive shuttle, had the post installed before the other riders finished the first run.

    Didn't love the lever feel at the factory setting, but its tuneable with air pressure. I was able to pull the post out and access the valve, dropped it about 50psi and its very light action now, but easy tactile feedback between the ratchet and slammo settings. All this was done without having to disconnect the cabling.

    The post was amazing in action on the mountain today. I have to give it top marks for how precisely positionable it is and how intuitive it is to work. In about 10 minutes it was like I've had it forever. Learning curve?

    There are a couple of places on the mountain where a pedalling section abruptly becomes a section of gnar with wheelie drops and steep chutes. I am pretty sure the post got used more than my gears and brakes.

    No exaggeration, I surprised myself in a couple of spots where I had extra confidence to hit some big drops...was super easy to set up and drop the seat and flow right off.

    Tomorrow is a trail day, will post more impressions.

    Thoroughly loving it so far. Bomber construction.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dump View Post
    Usd $499.00 (!)
    500 bills, directly from the manufacturer. that's ridiculous money.
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  20. #20
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    Today we rode in Pisgah.

    The route we did had a bunch of different sections. There was an uphill climb, parts were smooth, parts were techy. Then a big hike, over a ridge to an insane gnarfest downhill. Then a wet rooty sidehill trail with rocky stream crossings and logovers and boulder piles.

    I got a ton of chances to try the post in different scenarios.

    For the uphill, there were lots of places where the trail required hopping up over roots, water bars and obstacles, and it was great to be able to drop the post 1, 2 or 3 clicks to get a bigger hop while still being able to sit and pedal efficiently.

    My bike is hard to carry, but today I dropped the seat and was able to lift the whole bike from the lowered saddle. We had to walk a half mile up a skinny rocky ledge.

    Obviously the downhill was amazing, I rode a bunch of it just 1 or 2 clicks down. Again it was easy to move to a fully slammed position in time for a serious drop. Even with the bike rodeo-ing around.

    In the final flow trail, I was slamming the seat for river and stream crossings, and I was managing to have enough space to hop my bike trials-style up and over the far rocky stream banks and downed logs, then right back to pedaling position.

    So everything was flawless.

    I totally love the small changes the post is capable of. In tons of situations, it was a huge thing.

    A couple of people have mentioned the cost...I have watched my buddies travel with spare posts and it seems like everyone owns two or three, with a bunch of backups. It seems like everyone has a story about breaking or fixing a post. Lifetime warranty on the 9point8. Just holding it in your hand makes other droppers look like a toy. It's build quality and function are on par with any top end fork or component. It's obvious that there's substantially more involved than a lot of what's on the market.

    I have to admit, this post is making me rethink my saddle position. I was running my seat back on the rails before, so I could slide fore/aft to get minor leg extension changes. Now that this post can achieve that in the vertical dimension, I am seeing how uncentered I have been before at times. The ability to get a small tweak in leg extension is kind of a game changer...felt so much stronger on the climbs today and made a ton of difficult sections.

  21. #21
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    I brake with one finger, so I think taking the finger of the front brake is unacceptable. There are many times where a surprise downhill section requires dropping the post immediately while you are riding down.

    Isn't that the the whole point of a dropper post, quick on the fly adjustment while you ride?

  22. #22
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    n/m

  23. #23
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    Hey croz...the brilliant design of the lever let's you go left or right, top or bottom and at right angles. Its way more customizable than any other control I have ever had. Tons of ways you could mount it. It plays nicely with the other stuff on my bars...sits just along my other controls with perfect offset.

  24. #24
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    I got my post the other day and took it out for a good solid ride on some known-trails (I prefer testing new gear on trails I am familiar with first). I've tried a few posts including Rock Shox, Specialized and AMP (All Mountain Post: no longer around). The AMP post I find is one of the best because it has 3 indexed riding positions and I like to know where I am in saddle height.
    That is what intrigued me about the 9point8 Pulse with it's "stepper" feature.

    Like lukey mentioned, the build quality is top notch. There is a bit of weight to the post but it feels super solid. Some other post feel a bit flimsy to me, especially the heads that bolt down the saddle. The saddle clamping mechanism on the Pulse is sturdy!
    I went with the non-offset saddle head and it worked out fine.

    Also, as lukey said, setup was super easy and quick. Again, you can feel the design and build quality when you are installing the lever and post. The lever is very light and the pieces fit intricately together (very cool).
    The lever is a lot smaller than I was expecting. Not sure if it's the angle of some of the pictures on their website but the lever isn't as intrusive as I would have expected.

    Basically, the post does what you expect it to do. If you are experienced using a dropper post then you know the benefits of using one: drop it down for more control and room when doing anything technical and steep; pops back up when you are riding normally or climbing. That's all you can really ask for it to do.
    At the lever it feels responsive and solid.

    After a few tries you get a good idea what the "stepper" function is all about. I am not a "slam the post all the way down" type of rider. To me dropping the post all the way down is too much.
    I usually dropped the post down 3 to 4 steps and it was perfect for fast downhill sections. It's nice to know that you can push it down more if you need to.

    As for the lever? It takes some getting used to.
    I have my brakes setup for single finger braking so they are positioned a little far inward, which puts the post lever pretty far away. I tried installing the post lever on the outside of the brake lever and rode around my block to see if that would work and found it to interfere with my hand when riding.
    Definitely not a good idea. Keep the lever on the inside of your brake and shift lever setup.

    Towards the end of the ride I was getting accustomed to the lever for post. Maybe a couple of little angle adjustments to get it right.

    As for what CrozCountry said: I understand where you are coming from. Taking your finger away from your brake lever to adjust the post can be a little unnerving and I had a couple of sketchy moments but I think it depends on how well you know the trail to prepare to drop the saddle. I am considering maybe putting the lever on the left side of the bar so I can always have my right finger working the rear brake.

    All I can say is that there is a bit of adjustment time to operating it and it becomes more natural the more you use it.

    The product looks and feels like it will last and take some abuse.

  25. #25
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    I am back from my trip now, and just wanted to drop back in to mention a couple more impressions. The post continued to work well for the rest of the trip, and there were zero issues with the performance. So all totally positive.

    On the third day, we did a ride that began with a 9-mile climb. Many long sections of the climb were steep enough to require a forward position on the bike to keep the front wheel down.

    I had been experimenting with the extension of the post a bit. Before the ride, I inserted the post so that on full extension, it was +5mm *longer* than my old neutral position. Then, using it riding on the trail, I would ride normally dropped 1 click down from full, to put me in my exact same position as before. In other words, the post is +5mm's longer than normal, and I simply drop it one click down 5mm from the top. It's super easy to reset the post to this position and to know where you are with it.

    The benefit of this scheme really shone on this long climb. When I was slid forward on the bike, I could click the post up 5mm's to full extension, and therefore get *normal* leg extension while being in the right spot where I was also keeping the front wheel down on the climb. (Normally, from the front of the saddle, you're also a little closer to your pedals.)

    Think of it like a climb setting like on some forks. Very very cool: a dropper post with a climb setting!

    Most of the other nice things about the post are mentioned in my earlier messages.

    So far, it's a really killer product.

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