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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Is 30 lbs heavy for a 5" FS trail bike?

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    wondering the same thing myself. It seems that most of the bikes that have 5" front and rear seem to be right around 30lbs.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotzKiss
    Thank you
    no it's not

  4. #4
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    Heck no! My 4/3.5" fully weighs nearly that much, depending upon my choice of pedals. I am hoping my new choice of wheels will bring it in under 29 lbs.

  5. #5
    a dad
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    only if you think its too heavy and complain about it....mine is around 30 and i haven't had any problems riding everything i used to and more...
    BBZ

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  6. #6
    MTB B'dos
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    Nope, at least not to me. I ride a 4" travel bike that's somewhere's around that weight, I only notice the weight sometimes when I lift it and then lift lighter, smaller FS rigs (guess having an XL adds more weight than S & M frames)
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  7. #7
    Prof. of Doomology
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    hell no, mines 34(right now) doesn't slow me down on the climbs either
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  8. #8
    Wave Maker / Pot Stirrer
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    ... and if we just ... Weight is only an issue if...

    You yourself are too light. I weigh 240 lbs, my new bike weighs 27 lbs, my old weighs 36 lbs. Is there any weight related performance differences?! No. Now if say a 145 lb rider were to do that change, then I would say yes, there are noticeable performance differences. It's not in individual weights where the difference is noticeable, it's in the ratio of power divided by complete weight (bike and rider). Sooo, all you featherweights out there will always worry about weight. Meanwhile, we clydes don't really give a cr@p. Ahh, the stressfree rides are soo nice.
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  9. #9
    Who are the brain police?
    Reputation: Locoman's Avatar
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    I'd say no. My 6" FS trail bike is 40lbs... Like with many other things, if it don't kill ya, it'll only make you stronger---
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotzKiss
    Thank you
    I would have thought that 30 pounds was too much before being cured of weightweenie syndrome. My cure (and that of a friend) came after riding a 26 mile epic more an hour faster on my 31 pound bike than same ride with my beloved light weight hard tail. Faster riding was the first wake up call, and then we realized how much better we felt the next day.

    I'm not bashing hard tails here - have a few and love them - but it seems to me the 29-31 pound bike is the ticket for handling all manner of conditions. I also do not buy the big bike is a crutch scenario some spew. I am a better rider no matter what bike I'm on due to my learning how to handle so much more.

    I'm sure I could shave off a few pounds on my bike, but it would cost $1000 or so, and not be as durable. More tire and tube weight has given me 2 flats in 3 years and more control, Mallet pedals are heavy, but offer the benefits of cleat for a long ride and control, and finally I've notice that rocks and falls break exotic parts with same ease as Deore through XT level. My Bomber fork is not a light weight, but it has been more reliable than other brands and can smack into about anything. I hope this all makes sense - the weight does not mean much if you want to be prepared for a huge range of riding types, fun and with a realistic budget and reliability scenario.

    Have fun!

  11. #11
    Chrome Toaster
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    30lbs for a 5" trail bike is pretty average and bordering on the lighter side if you ask me. For that type of bike you can maybe go down to 26 or 27 lbs with a practicle build and quite a bit of money. Anything lower than that would typically involve getting into more exotic lightweight parts that are impracticle for that purpose IMO.

  12. #12
    "El Whatever"
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    It's actually light.

    My Warp weighs around 35 pounds. The bike is fine, I'm slow. There's nothing on it that would not survive a nice crash for the riding I do.
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  13. #13
    hands up who wants to die
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    That's not heavy for a trail bike.

    If you are trying to turn a 5" trail bike into a XC race bike, like many people on this board seem to be doing, then it might be heavy.

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  14. #14
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    Not at all. My 4" FS is ~32lbs. My hardtail SS is (oddly) ~32lbs. 30's light to me.

  15. #15
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    No 30lbs is fine, depends what it built to contend with,
    my 4" comes in at just under 25lbs
    and my 6" is 28lbs,I don't notice the difference out on the trail
    well except for the sooooo supple suspension

  16. #16
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    30lbs weight

    We'll a few things to think about on that question. What type of riding, how sturdy are you looking for a frame to be...how rough, big a drops will you be running. I have a Kona Dawg primo 06 which weighs 30lbs and i find it is fine. It is 5" and has an rp3 on the backend.

    Something to consider on it is your rolling resistance. Sometimes the weight number has to be balanced with how good it rolls and what type of hubs you have.

    With good hubs you roll well so the weight only comes in when climbing and with a good suspension design you get hooked up.

    No kidding though...a hard tail weight when climbing is a bonus..but in the rough stuff the next day you are hurting on a hardtail.

    Hope that gives some input. Happy riding. jd

  17. #17
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    I agree with this post.

    30 lbs is not heavy for a 5"/5" bike. What matters is how much fun you have when you ride that bike. Obsessing over a pound here or there, while sometimes fun to pass the time, really won't make a huge difference on the trail. If you need to shave weight for the sake of being able to ride for longer periods of time, shed rotating weight at the tire/tube end of things.

    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger
    I would have thought that 30 pounds was too much before being cured of weightweenie syndrome. My cure (and that of a friend) came after riding a 26 mile epic more an hour faster on my 31 pound bike than same ride with my beloved light weight hard tail. Faster riding was the first wake up call, and then we realized how much better we felt the next day.

    I'm not bashing hard tails here - have a few and love them - but it seems to me the 29-31 pound bike is the ticket for handling all manner of conditions. I also do not buy the big bike is a crutch scenario some spew. I am a better rider no matter what bike I'm on due to my learning how to handle so much more.

    I'm sure I could shave off a few pounds on my bike, but it would cost $1000 or so, and not be as durable. More tire and tube weight has given me 2 flats in 3 years and more control, Mallet pedals are heavy, but offer the benefits of cleat for a long ride and control, and finally I've notice that rocks and falls break exotic parts with same ease as Deore through XT level. My Bomber fork is not a light weight, but it has been more reliable than other brands and can smack into about anything. I hope this all makes sense - the weight does not mean much if you want to be prepared for a huge range of riding types, fun and with a realistic budget and reliability scenario.

    Have fun!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotzKiss
    Thank you
    I feel a rant coming on ...

    It might be too light depending on the kind of trails in your area. I bought a Trek Liquid that weighed 31 pounds in an Extra Large Frame, but since moving to Arizona the bike has steadily been gaining weight to suit the steep, rocky trails in my neighborhood (I live 3 miles from Phoenix's South Mountain park). I've switched to a nice wide riser bar with stiff stem, and am now riding heavy-duty hubs with wide rims and medium-wide tires after pinch flats and broken spokes. What worked back in Idaho, where we had long gradual ascents and smooth hardpack descents doesn't work at all in Arizona.

    My bike is now up to 33 pounds and works much better. I only wish I had an 8 inch disc on the front instead of a 6 inch disc, which tends to fade. But I'm not quite ready to spring for the thru-axle fork which is supposedly necessary for safe operation of a large diameter disc brake.

    Especially watch out for bendy titanium baubles, like the XTR rear cassette that comes on high-end lightweight bicycles.

    Don't be a weight weenie. If you have a slight build you can easily gain a little muscle mass to push a slightly heavier bike. If you're heavy like me (185 pounds) a couple of pounds on the bike isn't even noticable.

  19. #19
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    No 30 pounds is more than fine.
    My large Slayer is 29 pounds.
    Mike
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  20. #20
    ride hard take risks
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    30 pounds thats almost XC light, not at all heavy.

  21. #21
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    No

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  22. #22
    Freeriding Feline
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    Nah....

    My Heckler is about 32 pounds.
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  23. #23
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    Hell, I have a 5" hardtail that weighs 36#. So nope, not heavy.

  24. #24
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperKat7
    My Heckler is about 32 pounds.
    Thats a Purrrdy bike you gots there.

  25. #25
    Takw/agranofsalt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    Hell, I have a 5" hardtail that weighs 36#. So nope, not heavy.
    How can you have a 5" [travel] hardtail

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