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  1. #1
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    26T chainring ???

    i don't think that i am the only one that considers moving to one chainring to rule them all.
    the ideal solution was to move to the new XX1 set
    cause i don't have spare money right now i want to do the most cost effective change.

    i consider myself a good technical rider with good stamina but in my riding i often use the 1-1 gear combination.
    because of the situation i did some math and found out that if i move to a 26T chainring and a 12-36T cassette i wont loose much.
    so i have two questions:
    1. does anyone uses the this gear setting ? how is it?
    2. i understand that the 26T is usually built to replace the small chainring so i don't suppose it is designed to attach itself to the crank. is there a product like that out there?

    thanks in advance
    victor

  2. #2
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    A 26:12 max ratio would officially make you the slowest rider on earth......

  3. #3
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    Depends on tire size. I have a 22t front chainring and 11-34 cassette in the rear on my Moonlander. At 90 rpm cadence the speed is 25 km/h, which is quite allright for a fat bike - considering that I don't race.

    I'm switching to a 26t chainring to get higher gearing, because currently I have no use for the lowest gearing - I run out of traction before needing them.

    2: Surly Mr. Whirly is a crankset resigned so that the small chainring is positioned like a middle ring on a conventional crankset. That way your chainring won't be so much inboard that using the small end of the cassette would distort the chainline (like a small-small combo usually does). 58 BCD 26t chainrings are available.

    For a regular trail bike the gearing does sound a bit small. I use 32 with 11-34 on my 26" AM bike.

  4. #4
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    IMO 26t will be to small for a single chainring set up. I have a 2x10 with a 11-36 in the back and a 26t - 36t in the front, which I do like. However, I do noticed that on the very steep climbs going 26 - 36 makes me loose momentum and I'm more efficient going to the next one down. What I'm saying is that on a 26t chainring you will not use the 36t cog, but will be missing the higher gears. On a single chainring set up I would go 30 for AM if you have lots of climbing and 32 for more XC.

  5. #5
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    Of course I'm assuming 26" wheel.

  6. #6
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    I consider similar gear ratio too ( I am ready to sacrifice some speed in downhills on road - the only place I need more gears ) , but if you are riding full sus 26t in front could compromise your suspension behavior - too much feedback, that's why I think of trying something like this
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26T chainring ???-p4pb2710895.jpg  


  7. #7
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    I am using a 28 tooth "widgit" on a 1x9 hardtail, the widgit uses the 64 inner attachment of a xt crank, the bike is being used as urban, so I cant tell how the widgit would do on trail, but its working very well.
    The finish is not as good as MRP or Blackspire, wich I use on other bikes, but it works as a chainguide and light bashguard.

    Widgit for 3 ring crankset | Widgit


  8. #8
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    I don't know about you, but I've spun out in a 32-11 gearing on my local singletrack. Solved the problem (kinda) by going 11-34t cassette with a 34t ring in front.

    Unless you're TRYING to be slower, I'd say run a 30+t ring, get a wide-range cassette (10spd allows for 11-36 these days) and man up. After suffering for a few rides you'll end up faster on everything.
    Go ride your bike.

  9. #9
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    i wouldn't go any less than 32t. i think there is more than enough gearing to work on all but the steepest of climbs. i just can't see it being practical. especially by increasing the range on the cassette. if anything, i'd go to a smaller range on the cassette. something like 11-27
    RIP Adam Yauch

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  10. #10
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    I am currently running single ring 32 12-36 on my Rune and make it through most things without pushing. I think 26 would WAY too low of a gear, just keep riding and build up some more leg strength. Lowest I would imagine going would be 30

  11. #11
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    I have a poor man XX1.

    That is a Bling ring 28 t. in the front.
    And a 11-38 Cassette.
    Is OK for All Mountain Riding with lots of climbing.

  12. #12
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    sooo high

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by b1rdie View Post
    I am using a 28 tooth "widgit" on a 1x9 hardtail, the widgit uses the 64 inner attachment of a xt crank, the bike is being used as urban, so I cant tell how the widgit would do on trail, but its working very well.
    The finish is not as good as MRP or Blackspire, wich I use on other bikes, but it works as a chainguide and light bashguard.
    It works as a chainguide, but it DOES NOT work as a bash guard, even a light one. The moment it sees an obstacle it folds over.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine View Post
    i wouldn't go any less than 32t. i think there is more than enough gearing to work on all but the steepest of climbs. i just can't see it being practical. especially by increasing the range on the cassette. if anything, i'd go to a smaller range on the cassette. something like 11-27
    That would depend on the trails you ride though? I had 28t, now 32... I do like the higher gearing going down, but 28t definitely had it's moment on slower technical trails where higher gearing was not needed.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropadrop View Post
    That would depend on the trails you ride though? I had 28t, now 32... I do like the higher gearing going down, but 28t definitely had it's moment on slower technical trails where higher gearing was not needed.
    This, pretty much. I'm running a 30 x 11-36 on three bikes.

    Most of where I ride is a lot of short climbs and descents. They are tight and twisty enough, and with enough slow techy bits in between that spinning out on the way down isn't an issue, and neither is needing a granny.

    Also am coming from a start as a roadie, so spinning a faster cadence in a lower gear is what I'm used to as opposed slower with a higher gear.

    To the OP: pick up a few rings of different sizes, try them out, see what works for you and your riding. What works for one person may not work for everyone else, eh?
    Last edited by scrublover; 12-17-2012 at 04:02 AM.
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  16. #16
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    I used to run a 38/29 to a 11-34 on a 26". The 29-34 made for some hard climbs but it could be done. The 29 was good for quick accelerations too. I ride in New England,it worked for me. I can see a 28 or 30 working out well,not much for dirt roads but fine elsewhere.

  17. #17
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    what kind of crank? if it is spider less you can have someone custom fab you a 26t version of a bling ring. if not just buy a 26t granny and a blackspire granny god.

  18. #18
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    One thing to note: the way to get fast lap times and better average speed is mostly about avoiding low speeds. A higher momentary top speed you might achieve with higher gearing doesn't have that much of an effect on your total time.

  19. #19
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    thanks for the replies but i just now saw them ... the system didnt notified me that someone replied :-)

    I changed my target and now i am thinking on 28T

    on my bike i have 22-32 front and 11-34 back.
    currently on my rides i find myself using the 1-1 and 1-2 combos on long climbs. my bike weights around 15Kg and i need to use these gears.
    i want to put the 26T because this will put my most easy gear between my 1-2 and 1-3 gears and with a little hard work i will get use to it.
    the problem is that after talking to my LBS he told me that i will need a special chainguide for a single chainring.
    when i first thought about the setup i cam up with the current thinkg:
    1. finding a 28T that can replace my middle 32T chainring (better chain line?)
    2. using my current blackspire C4 bashgaurd to keep the chain from falling out
    3. keeping my blackspire stinger chain guide for tension

    will this be enough?

  20. #20
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    I'm running a 1x8 with 11-32 at the back and 34 teeth up front, I do occasionally want a lower gear when I'm tired but the top gear is just about perfect. I'll be switching to a 1x10 set-up with 11-36 back and keeping the 34 toothed ring up front, I reckon that will give me a wide enough range for just about anything.

  21. #21
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    Going to try 30x38 thinking it might be the perfect range for me and the terrain I mostly ride,from techy single track to DH runs.

  22. #22
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    so i didint get any answer yet

    if I take my current setup:
    1. SLX crankset with 22T-32T-bashgaurd
    2. blackspire stinger chain tensioner
    3. front derailer

    on this setup i:
    1. ditch my inner chainring
    2. remove the front derailer
    3. replace the 32T chainring with 30T

    will it work? what else i need to add so the chain wont fall from the chainring?
    if you can suggest cost effective solution it will be better since I am on a tight budget.

    10x in advance|

  23. #23
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    i just found the following device
    N Gear Jump Stop Chain Guide 1 3 8" 34 9mm New | eBay

    could this solve the problem a keep the chain from falling inward?

  24. #24
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    I would go for a 32-34 personally but 30-32 should be fine. You probably ride harder than I do but I've found that as long as I replace the chain / front ring when needed the chain never comes off. As you're on a budget, try it without the chain guide first and see how it goes.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover View Post
    ...spinning out on the way down isn't an issue...

    Also am coming from a start as a roadie, so spinning a faster cadence in a lower gear is what I'm used to as opposed slower with a higher gear.
    +1, A quick burst of 100+ cadence will put a rider at 36+ tooth speed (which is usually trail limited anyway) then the downhill momentum will maintain that speed. A small front may give up some fire road downhill speed tho = so what

    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover View Post
    To the OP: pick up a few rings of different sizes, try them out, see what works for you and your riding. What works for one person may not work for everyone else, eh?
    Great advice.

    P

  26. #26
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    the widget is the biggest peice of crap I've ever had on my bike!!!!!! not only do the chainguides on either side of the ring bend like tinfoil over every rock, if you ride anywhere where there is leaves or mud, they get picked up an stuck in the widget to the point of your chain riding on ground leaves and mud instead of your chain ring. I had a 28t and when I was researching it, everyone told me to just man up an with a 32t. So I went with a 32t mrp guide with bash and a 11-36 10 speed rear... should've listened to everyone in the beginning.. not one problem, pedals way more efficient than with a 28t and I've gotten ALOT stronger because I force myself to make the climb..
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  27. #27
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    I have decided.
    I will keep my 32t middle chainring and switch my cassette to 12-36.
    I hope the chain wont fall.
    If it will fall i will use the cheep guide to prevent it from falling inward.
    10x for all the help

  28. #28
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    I run a 26t x 11-36.......use a granny god as bash and n gear jump stop as inner guide on a blur 4x.......has worked out perfectly for me........I'd do a bashwich if I was strong enough to do a 32t up front

  29. #29
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    But if i use the inner chainring wont i have problems with the chainline

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by vichila View Post
    But if i use the inner chainring wont i have problems with the chainline
    Sure if you only use an inner chainring. The widget solves this by offsetting the chainring towards the middle. Other solutions such as the MRP rings remove the spider and the ring ends up towards the center.

  31. #31
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    I currently use a square taper bb so I was able to get a longer spindle to help the chainline, but currently building up new bike and won't have this option. I see people mention chainline, but what problems do people actually have?

  32. #32
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    32 tooth

    I run a 1 X 10 with a 32 tooth. A 26 tooth is way too small especially when going downhill!

  33. #33
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    On my 29er I run a 9sp 26-36 up front and a 34-11 out back. Standard 64/104 4 bolt crank. Works for me for my hills and such. Bash guard too for those New England rocks and logs.

  34. #34
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    I must not be as fast as others....I've only had my 1x9 setup for a year, but I've never need more than 26 x 11.....I don't race......where do you guys ride that you need a bigger gear, kind of curious how slow I am........

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by vichila View Post
    I have decided.
    I will keep my 32t middle chainring and switch my cassette to 12-36.
    I hope the chain wont fall.
    If it will fall i will use the cheep guide to prevent it from falling inward.
    10x for all the help
    The chain will fall.

    think of some kind of retention system because you will need it.

    The 32 by 36 combination is prone to give you problem, the chain will rub somewhere for sure, to get a good chainline at 1x9 or 1x10, a smaller chainring is better imho.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by b1rdie View Post
    The chain will fall.

    think of some kind of retention system because you will need it.

    The 32 by 36 combination is prone to give you problem, the chain will rub somewhere for sure, to get a good chainline at 1x9 or 1x10, a smaller chainring is better imho.
    what? the chainline will be the same whether the ring is 30, 32 or 48. i'm running 32 x12-36 and it's fine.
    RIP Adam Yauch

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  37. #37
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    Guide/Bash Guard

    Now that you have decided on going 1 X 10 you need a chain guide. I would suggest the Straitline Silent Guide mtbiking.ca

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by vichila View Post
    tweights around 15Kg

    amurican boy, do you speak it?

  39. #39
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    the metric system is used by 99% of the world.
    RIP Adam Yauch

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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine View Post
    the metric system is used by 99% of the world.
    ^^^This.

    As for dropping the chain, a couple things to minimize it.

    Short cage rear derailleur, clutch style if you can. Run as short a chain as you can get away with. An un-ramped chainring as well. Again, try it and see what works.

    Hardtail: bashring and JumpStop or some sort of upper guide is all most people need.

    Suspension: depends - on my 5" travel bike, an upper guide only works just fine. On my bike with near 7" of travel, an upper only resulted in once in a while chain drop, even with a clutch rear mech. Enough to make it annoying and have me use a full guide.

    Anything beyond that, well, it depends on your bike, your parts and particular setup, what sort of trails you ride, and how you ride them.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover View Post
    ^^^This.

    As for dropping the chain, a couple things to minimize it.

    Short cage rear derailleur, clutch style if you can. Run as short a chain as you can get away with. An un-ramped chainring as well. Again, try it and see what works.

    Hardtail: bashring and JumpStop or some sort of upper guide is all most people need.

    Suspension: depends - on my 5" travel bike, an upper guide only works just fine. On my bike with near 7" of travel, an upper only resulted in once in a while chain drop, even with a clutch rear mech. Enough to make it annoying and have me use a full guide.

    Anything beyond that, well, it depends on your bike, your parts and particular setup, what sort of trails you ride, and how you ride them.
    Well, sort of. Ever wonder why handlebars were 25.4mm diameter? Oh yeah, that's an inch. Now they are "31.8mm" OR 1.25" diameter. So yeah, they use metric (and yes things are changing slowly over time) but rest of world really still use 'merican quite a bit.
    "It looks flexy"

  42. #42
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    Just ordered a canfield 9 tooth hub. Going to run this with a 28 tooth mrp bling ring and their micro guide. Since I was on a 2x9 with 24-36 and 11-32, the 1x10 will have close to the same range. Also increase in bb clearance (good thing on the low blur trc). Much cheaper than the xx1. Seems I am always behind the times. Just when they come out with an 11 speed, I'm ready to upgrade to 10.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by gticlay View Post
    Well, sort of. Ever wonder why handlebars were 25.4mm diameter? Oh yeah, that's an inch. Now they are "31.8mm" OR 1.25" diameter. So yeah, they use metric (and yes things are changing slowly over time) but rest of world really still use 'merican quite a bit.
    Actually miles yards feet inches lbs gallons etc is not American at all. It's British. But only in mountain bike fiction do you see parts such as tires weighed in lbs and oz.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine View Post
    what? the chainline will be the same whether the ring is 30, 32 or 48. i'm running 32 x12-36 and it's fine.
    Think this is like what I mean:

    Chainline can also refer to the relative position of the front and rear cogs to each other, without regard to the bike centerline. This is called "effective chainline". A bike may have the crankset inward or outward some distance of the rear cogset center.

    took it from : Park Tool Co. » ParkTool Blog » Chain Line


    Would like to see you climb a 28% technical strech of more than 300m on a 48x36 ring on an all mountain rig.

    The topic is about a 28 ring, adapted.

    I tried it like this




    but prefered this:



    the inner ring almos touches the chainstay.

    This bike is not built for trail or all mountain, so it did go well with a 28 an 11x34, but my other bikes have a front derailleur, because i feel it gives a range that a single cannot do.

  45. #45
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    To simplify things i will like to know if there is a middle ring (104 bcd) with 30T?

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by vichila View Post
    To simplify things i will like to know if there is a middle ring (104 bcd) with 30T?
    I did looked at this very close, and no there is not a 30t for 104 bcd, and the reason is because the center dia of holes will be at the tooth. however, you can install a 30t widgit chainring which actually bolts in the granny holes (64 bcd), but they offset the center of the chainring so that the chain line is line with the center ring.

  47. #47
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    Black Spire Super Pro 30t,works great with there 38t big ring,can rip up or down.

  48. #48
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    I did looked at the super pro and from what I saw it jumps from 28t / 64bcd to 32t / 104 bcd. Where you can get the 30t? And is it 64 or 104 bcd?

  49. #49
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    Oh sorry it is 64bcd,I wanted to run two chain rings for a broader range of gearing for the various terrain I ride and for Enduros,any shop should be able to get them.Bti has them in stock.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by vichila View Post
    To simplify things i will like to know if there is a middle ring (104 bcd) with 30T?
    Yes, but you need to file the edge of the spider so the chain can have enough free space, there is a thread very interesting with photos in here somewhere.
    the manufacturer:
    30T Andersen’s Machine Chainring… « The Lazy Rando Blog…

  51. #51
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    For what it's worth, I switched to a 32t up front with just a bash. Worked good but, i would drop chain at east twice a ride. Usually on a pretty tech downhill or the total opposite a tech uphill. Bought a MRP G2 BB Mount chainguide. I will never ride with anything else. Took a couple rides to get over not having a granny to drop to. Then I realized all that granny was doing was holding me back any how. It's a great setup and I have had no issue's as of yet. I recommend it to anyone. It's on a Cannondale Rush.

  52. #52
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    i have only a stinger chain tension and a bash
    do you think it will be sufficient to hold the chain inplace?

  53. #53
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    Should be, I would think. Try it out, see if you like it and if not upgrade.
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  54. #54
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    As nobody noticed my remark, I will say again: the suspension will not work properly downhill with small chagrining (how small depends on the suspension type), you will have noticeable kickback. Try going through rocks in high speed on your 22 front ring and you'll notice the difference. Here's some explanation from

    Mountain bike suspension servicing in Bedfordshire

    Axle paths


    Simply described as the virtual path drawn by the wheel axle as the suspension system is compressed, some suspension designers concentrate all their efforts on getting this elusive path perfect for the intended use of the frame.

    The perfect path for absorbing a bump is one that moves backwards and then up raising the wheel up and over the obstacle.
    However to achieve this means you have to have a system where the distance between your main pivot and your wheel increase at some point. This can be termed as “growth”. This growth can cause some problems in terms of the way the bike handles and pedals.

    The bigger the growth in the system the more the drive train has to react to counteract the rotating forces of the suspension and the virtual increase in chainstay length. This manifests’ itself in an affect called “pedal kick back”. Pedal kickback is where the cranks rotate against the direction the wheel travel rotation and actually move a few degrees. This increases during travel and affects bikes with high growth more than those with smaller more horizontal axle’s paths.

    You can see this effect by watching the rear mech movement when compressing the suspension.

    Pedal kick back can be reduced by using a bigger chain ring and manufacturers will optimise their designs around a certain chaining size. For example the Commencal DH frames have been optimised to use a either a 36 or 38 tooth chain ring.
    Some companies go a step further by fitting a roller above the chain ring to mimic a much bigger chain ring size and minimise the pedal kickback.

    So a compromise must be used to optimise the frame for its intended use. If you design the suspension to be very efficient at soaking up bumps, chances are its not going to pedal well and suffer from pedal kickback. But if you design the bike to minimise pedal kick back you suffer bump response.


  55. #55
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    10x
    very informative

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by pe6u View Post
    Try going through rocks in high speed on your 22 front ring and you'll notice the difference.
    Don't you mean: "Try going through rocks, WHILE PEDALING...
    If you are not tensioning the chain, there will be no kickback.

  57. #57
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    That's not true, compress your suspension quickly in place with your chain on small chainring (and without you on the bike) and you'll see your pedals turn backwards, try it with the biggest chainring and the turn will be significantly lower if present. When your feet are on the pedals this will prevent the suspension from working properly, try run same fast bumpy trail with different chainring on the trail and you will feel it. I put a roller (like from the pictures of my previous post) in my pivot and with 22t chainring the suspension worked better then on 36t chainring and waaay better than 22t without roller.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by pe6u View Post
    That's not true, compress your suspension quickly in place with your chain on small chainring (and without you on the bike) and you'll see your pedals turn backwards, try it with the biggest chainring and the turn will be significantly lower if present. When your feet are on the pedals this will prevent the suspension from working properly, try run same fast bumpy trail with different chainring on the trail and you will feel it. I put a roller (like from the pictures of my previous post) in my pivot and with 22t chainring the suspension worked better then on 36t chainring and waaay better than 22t without roller.
    Done that and seen it. But we are talking about compressing while wheels are spinning. I have a vpp bike (is there a worse design for kickback?) and I felt the feedback from the suspension. But I have only felt it pepaling, never coasting or pumping.

  59. #59
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    Kickback is simply caused by the BB and hub moving away from each other relatively, which means the upper part of the chain causes the cranks turn backward or cassette turn forward, or a little of both. When pedaling, the freehub is locked and can't turn further, and the chain is under tension from pedaling -> kickback.

    When coasting, the freehub and cassette are initially static (as are the pedals) while the hub body is turning. When the suspension is compressed, the cassette is able to start turning forwards, because the hub is already in motion. A noticeable kickback could manifest itself during a very fast compression combined to a lot of engagement points in the hub, but normally it should not be felt, just like YRG reported.

    The lack of tension on the upper chain when coasting can also be noticed as chain slap. When you are pedaling, the upper part of the chain will not slap the chainstay.

  60. #60
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    I'm also looking for a 26t chainring for xx1 and was wondering if anything new has come up in the past year or so since this thread last saw activity.

    Yes, I need gears that low. Currently I'm running 22-32-42 up front on my 26er and usually run 11-32 on the back but I like to throw on a 11-34 cassette for steep high altitude rides. I'm shopping for a 29er and did the math. 26t up front and 10-42 in back would be about like 11-33 in the back on my 26" bike with the big chainring missing. I think I'd be willing to give up a little low end and the big chainring for the simplicity and lightness. I'd mount a bigger chainring for most rides.

  61. #61
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    26T chainring ???

    As mentioned above often frames are designed and optimized to run with a 30 or 32 ring up front. I've owned two mini link bikes that exhibited awful kickback in granny. I don't ride in the mountains so I can manage with the 10-42 1X cassette. If you really need such a small front ring for climbing maybe you should get a XX 2X10 set up with an 11-36 cassette?


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    Thanks for the info. I'm looking at Santa Cruz bikes that come in 3x10 kits with a 24-32-42 crankset, so 26 should work just fine in granny. Since 2x10 has all the complexity and almost the weight of 3x10 I'm thinking triple or single up front, as silly as that may sound.

  63. #63
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    Wolftooth makes 26t direct mount rings for SRAM cranks
    Wolftooth componets

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    When I switched to a 1x10, I was initially very worried that I'd be working too hard. I was leaving a 3x9 with a 22t and an 11-34. I used my granny gears often, and I was always last one to the top. I had done all the calculations, and it looked like I would lose my lowest gear or two by going with a 1x10. I still went for it and bought a 28T and an 11x36 cassette. I do work a tiny bit harder on the steepest of climbs, but I get to the top of them far faster. Overall, I think I am actually saving some energy by not spinning for an extra minute or two on each climb. It's a trade off: Spend a bit more energy for a shorter time, versus less energy spent for a longer time. Now that I'm used to it, I would never go any lower than a 28-36. I am actually faster with the new taller gearing, and I'm no more tired than I used to be.
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    Before I went the way of 1x11...
    I had an XT m785 2x10 crankset running a 32t chainring at the outboard position
    Rather the letting the granny position go to waste I had a 24t ring on there. I didn't use a front derailleur. So, on the rare occasion that there was a long grind up. I would stop and move the chain over by hand. That situation didn't come up very often.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by voodoo5 View Post
    A 26:12 max ratio would officially make you the slowest rider on earth......
    I'm probably faster than you on my single speed...
    Grow some food for yourself.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyinmike View Post
    Wolftooth makes 26t direct mount rings for SRAM cranks
    Wolftooth componets
    Thanks! I looked at their website and sent them an inquiry to verify it will fit XO1 or XX1.

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    Good to know, but not so sure that will work for my situation. I'm looking for a real low gear for rides between 10,000 and 13,000 ft elevation. The issue I have up there is not so much leg energy but running out of air unless I'm in a really low gear on the climbs. Perhaps at the point I'd need the 26t I'd be better off pushing the bike up anyhow.

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    Very interesting approach, kind of an extrapolation of the friction shift lever on the downtube of my old road bike. I wonder if some practice you could kick gently with your right foot to downshift from the 32 to the 24? Or just carefully hand shift on the fly with full finger gloves

  70. #70
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    26T chainring ???

    Quote Originally Posted by geeride7 View Post
    Very interesting approach, kind of an extrapolation of the friction shift lever on the downtube of my old road bike. I wonder if some practice you could kick gently with your right foot to downshift from the 32 to the 24? Or just carefully hand shift on the fly with full finger gloves
    Been there, done that.

    Use your heel for the downshift. Too dangerous to use your finger on the fly.
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  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by geeride7 View Post
    Thanks! I looked at their website and sent them an inquiry to verify it will fit XO1 or XX1.
    Wolftooth is probably your best choice if you want to run a NarrowWide ring..
    I've seen a few setups where a smaller ring is run in the granny position on a 2x10 or 3x10 crank.
    Then a light bash guard like -----> BBG bash guard
    is run on the middle or outer position
    The problem with that one is the chainline is too shallow...

  72. #72
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    Why does everyone say a 26 front is too low?

    Its too low (only by a little) for me, but maybe the OP does a lot of extended fireroad climbing. Thats the only time I use my lowest gear (24-32), but I am glad I have it for those occasions. My high gear is 34-11, and I am glad I have it for the few times I need to go downhill fast.

    Sounds to me like the OP could use a double (lots of up and down), and if thats not the case, and he rides flatish trails, a 32 or 30 chainring would be plenty. Speed is key for obstacles and rough trail.

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    Some say 26 is too low because in the 1x11 world, it is 26ring to 42cog which is a lot lower than your 24/32 lowest gear. But on a 29er, its a higher end ratio than the 22-34 I currently run on my 26er for high altitude riding. I think 26/42 is a good low gear for a typical mtber on a 29er going up moderately steep trails above 12,000 ft. But I'd agree is too low for racers, hammers, and low altitude riders.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by geeride7 View Post
    Some say 26 is too low because in the 1x11 world, it is 26ring to 42cog which is a lot lower than your 24/32 lowest gear. But on a 29er, its a higher end ratio than the 22-34 I currently run on my 26er for high altitude riding. I think 26/42 is a good low gear for a typical mtber on a 29er going up moderately steep trails above 12,000 ft. But I'd agree is too low for racers, hammers, and low altitude riders.
    22-34 is not lower than 26-42.

    Not sure how you did your math there. But I get that its nice to have some good low end at elevation. My first trip about 12000 feet was eye opening. I couldn't even think. My typical riding is around 6000 feet. Now that I think about it, at ~1000 feet, I could push a 32-32 up a steep 6 miler no problem.

    However, I still think that ratio (1.3 gain ratio on a 29er) is still too low, enless you are are a extra-clyde.

  75. #75
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    22-34 on a 26er is a slightly lower END RATIO than 26-42 on a 29er, when you figure in tire size and assume the same crankarm length. I know from experience that 28-42 would be too high for me and a lot of riders at 12,000. That's why you don't see much 1x up there. I'm not the fastest of bananas!

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