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  1. #1
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    23 vs. 28mm rims for AM use ?

    I started riding mtn bikes on your typical 23mm wide XC rim. Not long after riding mt bikes I switched out my 2.0 - 2.2" tires for 2.35 - 2.5" tires (Moto background influence). Running the XC rims I did quite a bit of pich flatting running low 30's air pressure. Decided I should have wider rims and my DH bike ended up w/ 36mm rims and my trail bike 32mm rims. Fast forward a few years I have noticed running 28mm rims my tire tread is rounder and my bike rolls faster @ high 30's pressure w/ little to no flatting. I now have 28mm rims on my big bike and planned on DT Swiss 5.1's (28mm wide) for my trail bike. Got to thinking can I get by with 23mm rims thus saving weight etc. ? I want to run 2.35 tires w/ Kenda Enduro tubes, or should I just stick with 28's ? Thanx

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    Got to thinking can I get by with 23mm rims thus saving weight etc. ? I want to run 2.35 tires w/ Kenda Enduro tubes, or should I just stick with 28's ? Thanx
    Stick with the 28s for fewer pinchies, more stability at lower pressures, etc. But save weight by going a lightweight tube (100g vs. the typical 200g tube). If you aren't pinching on the wider rims, then you could probably run the lighter tubes.

    Try it out. Its a $5 test for 100g is savings at the outside of the wheel.....

    P

  3. #3
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    What tires do you want to run? Some tires run better with a round profile, others with a flatter profile. Personally I've bought into the wider rims trend, especially if your looking to run 2.35 Nevegals. Those tires don't like skinny rims, they tend to fold under when pushed hard in that condition. I prefer wider rims on all the tires I've run, but I like to run downhill rubber for everything lately. If I was doing more trailriding as opposed to shuttling/riding up fireroads to DH chutes I might want to run some lighter/skinnier rubber. I'd just try to match your rim width to your riding style and rubber preference.
    Bike good, work bad.

  4. #4
    TNC
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    Agree with this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clutchman83
    What tires do you want to run? Some tires run better with a round profile, others with a flatter profile. Personally I've bought into the wider rims trend, especially if your looking to run 2.35 Nevegals. Those tires don't like skinny rims, they tend to fold under when pushed hard in that condition. I prefer wider rims on all the tires I've run, but I like to run downhill rubber for everything lately. If I was doing more trailriding as opposed to shuttling/riding up fireroads to DH chutes I might want to run some lighter/skinnier rubber. I'd just try to match your rim width to your riding style and rubber preference.
    The specific tire can change this issue dramatically, both from the tread design/pattern and the sidewall rigidity. I've run skinny Mavic 317 disc rims all the way to a couple of 32mm DH rims for aggressive trail riding. Some tires sucked equally because they didn't like being spread over the wider rim while some did poorly being "pinched up" on a skinny rim. My rim comparison here is extreme, of course, but it pointed out how the tread design and sidewall design of tires reacted to the two extremes. So there's probably not a clear formula unless it's the issue that most really big tires do much better on really big rims and the converse is true on the really skinny side of the scale. In the middle, however, there are a whole lot of variables. Additionally, I believe when you throw in tubeless setups into the mix, it changes some of these variables even more.

    I'm starting to come to a conclusion on my current setup on the front of my Nomad that involves a wider rim. I went to one of these new 650B tire/wheel setups on the front. The Velocity rim is a little wider than what I usually run in the CrossMax XLs I have. The Velocity Blunt rim is basically a 28mm, and the NeoMoto 650B 2.35 tire has a rounder profile than my 2.5 Weirwolf tires that I usually run. This has been just about an ideal match. This rounder profile tire puts a perfect footprint on the ground with the spread caused by the wider rim. The tire is set up in tubeless mode, and traction and other performance characteristics are just downright awesome once the best air pressure was sorted out. However, with another tire and another rim these results could obviously vary. It seems every combination one tries is a juggling act, and sometimes they work out perfectly.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    The Velocity Blunt rim is basically a 28mm, and the NeoMoto 650B 2.35 tire has a rounder profile than my 2.5 Weirwolf tires that I usually run. This has been just about an ideal match. This rounder profile tire puts a perfect footprint on the ground with the spread caused by the wider rim. The tire is set up in tubeless mode, and traction and other performance characteristics are just downright awesome once the best air pressure was sorted out. However, with another tire and another rim these results could obviously vary. It seems every combination one tries is a juggling act, and sometimes they work out perfectly.
    Another thing to consider....

    Tires are very condition/riding technique specific.

    Squared tires do better in loose, while rounded profiles do better on harder surfaces. But that is general as there is tread design to consider (for example the Weirwolf is slam into the corners kinda tires with less intermediate lean grip than say a Nevegal).

    Then there is your riding style, I like smooth transition to edge knobs - while you might like to slam that bike over in a lean on a turn....

    So know how you ride and what you ride and fit the best tool for the job. (grip trumps weight IMHO.)

    P

  6. #6
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    Currently alternating between 2.35 BG's and 2.4 Kenda Cortez's. I am pretty much a plow style rider weighing 210lb. Terrain is mixed in nor-cal. BG's hook up better but Cortez's roll better.

  7. #7
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    Keen, what did you end up goin with?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    Currently alternating between 2.35 BG's and 2.4 Kenda Cortez's. I am pretty much a plow style rider weighing 210lb. Terrain is mixed in nor-cal. BG's hook up better but Cortez's roll better.
    Norcal is a lot of hardpack and loose over hardpack, except for the Sierras (which changes everything ) So you could run the smaller rims or the wider rims. But if you fly through rock gardens and run Kenda tires (thin sidewall) you might be better off with 28mm.

    I run 28mm Mavic 321 in Auburn and bash through the boneyards with recklessness and don't pinch. I also run thicker side wall tires.

    P

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